June 2021

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS ENGLAND WENT careering towards the corner and flew round it against Australia. I have seen many false dawns before, mostly from England, but they rarely come when a side has beaten the world’s second best team, Australia by a whopping 17 points.And the truth is it could have been much more as England spurned at least three cracking chances to score more tries.(Watch the Highlights at http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/rugby_union/9177377.stm)In the past England have based such stunning victories as this on their powerful scrum but against Australia there were only seven scrums and five of them resulted in either free kicks or penalties.They showed some of the most adventurous play ever seen at Twickenham.Many in the 80,000 crowd had to rub their eyes when Ben Youngs attacked from behind his own line at the start of the second half. He dummied Quade Cooper and found Courtney Lawes deep in his 22. Lawes drew two defenders and sent Chris Ashton on an 85-metre run to the line. Stunning!England once again (following the game in Perth) targeted Quade Cooper and ran everyone at him. He came out second best.In Youngs they have also found a world-class player.Youngs was the clear man of the match but significantly six other England players had their best performances under Martin Johnson: Tom Palmer, Mark Cueto, Chris Ashton, Tom Croft, Dylan Hartley and Shontayne Hape. If a coach can get that sort of performance he will always be leading a winning side.The tempo Youngs brings to the match, allied with the pace of players like Ashton and Foden makes it work for England.Johnson has also found an inspirational captain in Lewis Moody, who did so much to help galvanise his team.And in Toby Flood a goalkicker who can now move into Jonny Wilkinson’s boots.James O’Connor missed kick after kick for the Wallabies while Flood slotted all nine of his for 25 points, a record for the fixture.The only alarm bells for England came in the way Kurtley Beale strolled to his two tries. Beale is one of the most talented players of his generation so perhaps they shouldn’t be too hard on them.England still can’t match New Zealand and it remains to be seen whether they can produce a different performance to beat South Africa but make no mistake the corner has been officially turned!The match also proved that referees can no longer officiate in matches on their own. Craig Joubert had little or no idea what was going on at the scrum and he should be embarrassed with a Test match in which the first five scrums were not competitions.Australia clearly had no interest in an arm wrestle with England – tough! The referee should have forced them to have one or awarded penalties and yellow cards. But Joubert’s performance, which followed Jonathan Kaplan’s shocker in the Australia v Leicester game prove they need help on the field. One referee for set pieces and another of the rest has to be the way forward as not even the top referees can cope any more.This threat to the game and it is definitely a threat must be stamped out immediately otherwise why not pick back row forward as props so they can maraud around the field.England (16) 35Tries: Ashton 2 Cons: Flood 2 Pens: Flood 7Australia (6) 18Tries: Beale 2 Cons: O’Connor Pens: O’Connor 2England: Foden; Ashton, Tindall (Armitage 62), Hape, Cueto; Flood (Hodgson 78), Youngs (Care 54), Sheridan (Wilson 67), Hartley (Thompson 70), Cole, Lawes, Palmer (Shaw 71), Croft, Moody, Easter (Fourie 78). Australia: Beale; O’Connor, Ashley-Cooper, Giteau (Barnes 59), Mitchell, Cooper, Genia (Burgess 48), Robinson (Slipper 55), Moore, Alexander, Chisholm (Mumm 57), Sharpe, Elsom, Pocock, McCalman (Brown 58).Att: 80,002last_img read more

first_imgThe power of PontyPontypridd completed a unique achievement in Welsh rugby on Sunday evening as they won the double double! For the second year in succession they are Principality Premiership champions and SWALEC Cup winners, after sealing their second double on the trot with a win over Cross Keys in the Premiership final.Ponty had to endure a very tough autumn, as they lost coach Dale McIntosh and skipper Chris Dicomidis to Cardiff Blues and had to endure the untimely death of prop Stuart Williams in October. The players, coaches, supporters and everyone else involved with the club pulled together in the face of this extreme adversity and ended up winning the league and cup and going all the way to the British and Irish Cup semi-finals. There were some fantastic, high-stakes games played this weekend. Which players rose to the occasion and which were found wanting? Mixed messages: Chris Ashton scored a try for Saracens but was also guilty of unsporting behaviourThe SinnersA bad shoutChris Ashton is at the centre of a row about good sportsmanship after he shouted “push it” at Nick Evans when the Harlequins’ fly-half was lining up a conversion during the Aviva Premiership semi-final clash on Saturday.The Saracens wing’s crude attempt to put Evans off sparked a bout of fisticuffs between the two teams and the RFU responded today with a statement saying: “Respect is one of the core values of rugby union and the RFU head of discipline, Gerard McEvilly has this morning [Monday] spoken to Chris about the incident, his responsibilities towards the game and his future conduct. The RFU will follow up the matter in writing.”When the stakes are high, players push the boundaries of sportsmanship by doing things like calling to opponents who are carrying the ball in the hope they might pass to them by mistake. However, yelling at a goal-kicker just as they are taking a penalty or conversion is just that bit more cynical, obvious and unpleasant. You might think it, but don’t shout it.Ashton has escaped any official punishment but it might be nice if he issued an apology.Big hitterGenerous as Tom Youngs’ reaction was to Salesi Ma’afu’s punch during the Aviva Premiership semi-final, (see above), the Northampton tighthead still needs to take his seat on the Sinners bench this week. He punched the Tigers hooker twice – a right-hand to the body and a left-hand to the face – and was quite rightly red-carded.Ma’afu is lucky his rush of blood did not cost Northampton the game as his 14 team-mates bravely battled to their 21-20 win over Leicester, but if he is banned at Tuesday’s disciplinary hearing the Saints will have to face two finals without him in the next two weeks, which will be a high price for his team-mates to pay.Seeing red: Salesi Ma’afu was sent off for this punch on Tom Youngs in the semi-finalCostly slipHarlequins came from nowhere to qualify for a place in this season’s Aviva Premiership semi-finals and, against the odds, were leading Saracens 17-11 early in the second half at Allianz Park.Just when it looked like an upset might be on the cards, the hosts began to increase the pressure and when Brad Barritt powered towards the line, Harlequins centre Tim Molenaar made the mistake of not hanging on to complete the tackle. Barritt got up and charged over the whitewash for a try which was converted for an 18-17 lead and from there Saracens went on to win 31-17. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsLeicester TigersLeinsterNorthampton Saints center_img The defeat was by no means all Molenaar’s fault, but small individual errors can prove costly in the biggest games and Saracens certainly took heart from his lapse. Joy and pain: Northampton’s players celebrate their win while the Tigers are floored The SaintsClassic clashSome people are calling it the best Aviva Premiership game ever and the Northampton v Leicester semi-final certainly had drama, skill, physicality and passion by the bucketload.Northampton snatched the win at the death, 21-20, with a try from Tom Wood but the plaudits deserve to be shared by a host of players from both teams, who served up such a fantastic sporting contest, and by referee JP Doyle who managed this hum-dinger of a battle brilliantly. It wasn’t only the Saints who were saints on this occasion.Social media was alive with praise for Doyle on Friday night, because of his level-headed and empathetic management of a full-blooded and at times brutal battle.It was the kind of match people will talk about for years – a real classic.Forgive and forgetLeicester hooker Tom Youngs found himself on the wrong end of a left-handed upper-cut from Northampton prop Salesi Ma’afu during their semi-final. Youngs was sin-binned for starting the altercation but Ma’afu was sent off for punching.A few hours later Youngs produced a brilliant, sporting reaction on Twitter, when he tweeted to Ma’afu: “Good shot mate, go well in the final”. Ma’afu replied: “Cheers mate. The jersey can overcome us in the heat of battle. I owe you a pint.”It was an exchange which perfectly encapsulated the camaraderie between opponents which rugby holds so dear and it helped to sweeten a potentially sour situation.Magic MadiganLeinster were looking to reach their fifth consecutive league play-off final when they took on Ulster in the RaboDirect Pro 12 semi-final on Saturday night, but were trailing 9-0 after an hour, with the Ulster defence keeping them at bay.However, Leinster gradually upped the pressure and capitalised with a couple of Jimmy Gopperth penalties to make it 9-6 as the final ten minutes began.Ian Madigan, on as a replacement for Brian O’Driscoll, was the man who finally breached the Ulster line, dotting down for a precious try which Gopperth converted.Leinster hung on for the last eight minutes and Madigan was rewarded with the Man of the Match award.Match winner: Finn Russell helped Glasgow Warriors reach their first Rabo finalYoung WarriorGlasgow are through to their first RaboDirect Pro 12 final, after losing at the semi-final stage for the last two years, and much of the thanks must go to young fly-half Finn Russell, who held his nerve in the biggest match of his life to kick his team back into the game after Munster took a 7-0 lead.Russell is only 21 and before this season he has not made a league start for Glasgow, but he has developed into an excellent player in the last few months. He coolly struck three first-half penalties to enable the Warriors to go into half-time 9-7 up and then converted Gordon Reid’s try early in the second half and the Scots held on for a 16-15 win.last_img read more

first_img Hey, English Rugby. I’ve an idea. See Sam Burgess there? The one who came from League amid unbearably enormous hype and was fast-tracked into the national set-up, where the coaches had totally different ideas for his future to those at his club. Yeah, him. The one who then worked hard and trained the house down to be handed an unlikely place in a World Cup squad at the expense of more experienced candidates and who then, in an embarrassingly subpar collective performance, played exactly how anyone with the slightest bit of foresight would have expected: occasionally excellent, occasionally shown up, as the team fell at the first hurdle. Yep, let’s blame him.The excellent #BlameBurgess twitter campaign is, of course, delivered with tongue placed firmly in cheek. But it comes from solid ground; at some stage or another, Burgess has been pilloried for just about everything, including – remarkably, in a sport so prone to highhorse-ism and desperate to show off quite how sporting it is while deriding less “gentlemanly” games – talking to the Australians as the players shook hands last week. String the man up.A couple of days after bookies stopped taking bets on a League return, Mike Ford insisted Burgess would stay in Union. But you couldn’t blame Burgess for wanting to go back. Indeed, you couldn’t blame him for wondering why he ever took on the challenge in the first place. There was nothing about the move that he needed, after all. Much remains for him in League.Grand plans: Mike Ford says Burgess still has ambitions in UnionBurgess wanted simply to succeed in a second code, and the nascent signs are that he has the hunger – the one thing we knew he had in spades – to continue on that journey. But what have the main features of his first year in the job been? There have been hits and carries, and probably only as many as really could have been expected, and plenty of mistakes too.But as he’s looked to learn the code, he’s been over-promoted, found himself politicised – right down to Stuart Lancaster pettily dropping him from the 23 to face Uruguay – and had his attempts to learn picked apart ruthlessly by pundits at home and abroad. His inexperience has been exposed occasionally, but not nearly as often as his detractors claim. In the firing line: Sam Burgess started against Wales in the World Cup His selection was not based on rugby nous but was a punt and an adventure, as he and Henry Slade caught Luther Burrell and Billy Twelvetrees napping. It hasn’t quite worked, but it shows what shaky ground Lancaster and co are stood on that it is arguably not the worst choice in the squad, and certainly not the worst for the eventual XVs. Burgess, who was far from England’s weakest player at the tournament, did not select himself. Blame him, and ask yourself this: was he really key to England’s disastrous campaign?There are those, it seems, who were desperate for him to fail from the start. Perhaps they believed he simply he did not have what it takes to succeed. Or maybe it was his sheer ambition, and belief he could instantly play at the World Cup. Or the fast-tracking, the big contract, the media circus or even a disdain for Rugby League and the idea of a big, bruising, bulldozing forward enjoying a successful conversion (there wasn’t much precedent for Burgess, remember). Who knows.Welcome to the NFL: ex-League star Jarryd Hayne has been celebrated in San FranciscoAll fans, press and ex-players will do by pinning too much blame on Burgess is drive him away, and that whichever way you square it, is a monumental folly. A year is no time in sport, and it is even less time to learn a sport. In fact, in the positions he has played, it’s quite staggering that he is as good as he already is. Burgess is box-office, a winner and a class act, and union will only be weaker if he is lost. Rugby is making itself appear even more insular and elitist (I see Jarryd Hayne being encouraged, not vilified, by NFL fans, for instance) and will only further ruffle feathers in the League community. There’s really no need. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The truth is that as much as most people wanted this to work, and as impressive as the strides he has already made are, Burgess was not ready for this World Cup. Now, though, he needs more time with Bath, more time on basics, an actual position, not petty club and country squabbling and maybe we could even afford him a bit of space, too. He’s 26 years old and 15 starts into his Union career. He has shown enough at the World Cup alone to reinforce the view that, in time, he can be a top international. Let him go now and it’s a complete and utter waste.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Let’s give the Bath back-row some time, says Will Macphersonlast_img read more

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A well-placed grubber kick can be the best way to puncture a tight defence. Kick the ball behind the opposition defenders and they have to turn while your team-mates can race onto it and look to capitalise on any open space, especially if they get to the ball first.Watch this video to see a mini rugby player demonstrating this skill. A good way to practise your accuracy is aim kicks along a line on the pitch – halfway or a touchline for example – and see how close you can keep the ball to the white paint. Try kicking along the line to a team-mate who can then practise his technique by kicking it back to you. When you’ve got the accuracy perfected, you can try it out in a match situation.In every issue of Rugby World magazine you will find step-by-step guides on how to perform various skills to help mini rugby players develop their overall game. Mini rugby coach Nigel Botherway also provides details of different training games minis can play, which are fun and help to improve skill levels. We have also produced videos showing mini players performing various skills so you can practise replicating what they do to learn the correct technique and improve your game.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out all the ways you can download the digital issue here.center_img A video showing mini rugby players how to grubber kicklast_img read more

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: GloucesterHighlight The Gloucester and Wales wing explains how sprint training is helping him speed up even more While his parents couldn’t be in Paris to see him make his Test bow due to Covid restrictions, they did get to see the post-match cap presentation via Zoom. “Mum was crying her eyes out,” he says.There’s a maturity about Rees-Zammit too. Computer games and watching his beloved Manchester United are on his agenda away from rugby, as is playing the odd round of golf, but he is also an ambassador for the Sporting Minds charity.“Mental health in young people is a problem at the moment and I just wanted to get involved and raise awareness that there’s always someone to talk to,” he says. “I’ve not struggled with mental health but I know a few boys who have and Sporting Minds is a great organisation, which helps a lot of players and people in general.”He marries level-headedness with innate confidence. He hasn’t been caught up in the fanfare that has greeted his breakthrough in elite rugby, but he does back himself on the pitch – just as his childhood hero, Shane Williams, told him to when they chatted on a podcast last year. Of course, with all the hype comes expectation, but he doesn’t mind because he has those same expectations of himself.“I’d be annoyed at myself if I didn’t do something when I get the ball, so I wouldn’t be surprised if someone else is,” says Rees-Zammit. “I don’t put pressure on myself, but I expect myself to do something when I get the ball. When I don’t, I’m hard on myself but learn from it, see what I could have done if I get the moment again.”Of course, much of the excitement around Rees-Zammit centres on his speed. Raw pace is such a big threat in rugby and it helped him to ten tries in 13 Gallagher Premiership matches last season. The good news for Gloucester and Wales fans is that he’s getting faster. The reason? He’s been working on his running technique for the first time, taking that raw talent and harnessing it. Why Louis Rees-Zammit is getting fasterTo mark winning his first Wales cap against France last October, Louis Rees-Zammit sang Robbie Williams’s Angels in front of the team – yet he wasn’t even born when the song was released! In fact, he arrived in the world more than three years after that 1997 hit. It’s a stark reminder of just how young he is.It may seem like the 20-year-old’s progress has been as rapid as the pace he shows when put into space on the wing, but there have been a few hurdles along the way.At 12 he was told he wasn’t good enough to make it as a pro rugby player, while at 16 he was told he’d never win a Wales cap. Yet at 18 he had scored five tries in his first three starts for Gloucester and by 19 had played in four Tests – and he looks set for a long career at international level.He’s certainly proven those early critics wrong, the knockbacks not only providing him with motivation but also resilience. As Rees-Zammit says: “I’ve always believed in myself and thankfully I’m here now.” It’s like a line from that Angels song: Wherever it may take me I know that life won’t break me.The support of his family has clearly been key. After a few years away from home, living in halls at Hartpury College and then a Gloucester Academy house, he moved back to Cardiff to be closer to his family and now lives with his older brother Taylor, a financial adviser.center_img Rees Lightning: Wales wing Louis Rees-Zammit takes on Italy last year (Getty Images) This article originally appeared in the February 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “I’d never practised sprinting to be honest, I’d just got it from my dad, Joseph. He played American Football, not rugby, is really athletic and he’s passed it on to me. For the last year, I’ve been doing sprint training with Gloucester’s S&C coach Dan Tobin and I’ve got faster.“It’s the mechanics of sprinting as well as the natural ability to run and there have been a lot of changes. My technique to start with was quite bad, so day by day we’ve changed that to get faster. My acceleration wasn’t the best, so it’s working on getting out of the blocks and having long strides to start with. It feels weird and it’s hard to explain, but I’m not thinking about it as much any more, do it subconsciously.“There are a lot of fast backs at Gloucester and it gets you faster each day, trying to outrun them. There’s me, Jonny May, Ollie Thorley, Charlie Sharples… We’re all quite fast and it is quite competitive. We have a bit of fun.”He’s embraced the Rees-Lightning moniker with which he was christened after stunning defenders in the English top flight with his speed – both his Instagram and Twitter profiles feature a lightning bolt – yet there is more to his game than pace.Yes, the speed with which he can cover ground is what makes him stand out but he is also adept under the high ball and makes good decisions around kick-pass-run. Growing up he played scrum-half, fly-half and centre, not moving to the wing until he went to Hartpury aged 16, and that experience of different positions no doubt helps his reading of the game and decision-making.There are still improvements to be made; he impressed with how he kept England in check out wide in the Autumn Nations Cup but was caught out defensively when it came to Johan Meyer’s try for Italy in Wales’ final match a week later.However, it’s only a little over a year since he made his first Premiership start and Test rugby is another few rungs up the ladder. He will take those learnings from Wales’ autumn campaign into the Six Nations.Danger man: Louis Rees-Zammit finds a gap in Georgia’s defence (Getty Images)“It (Test rugby) is a big step up – it’s much more intense, there are a lot more kicks, a lot more kick-chase, but I’m loving it. I treat it like any other game, although in the back of my head I know it’s a lot more intense and you’re playing the best players in each country.“All the players have helped me loads and the coaches have played a massive part too. Neil Jenkins has been my mentor, he’s been teaching me everything, how to play international rugby.“My high ball and my defence work have improved massively and I’m trying to make that the number one focus for me. Ultimately defence wins you games and I don’t want to let the team down defensively on the edge, so I’m working to improve that. I want to keep on top of my defence and on top of everything really, to get better every day. I want to improve everything; I’ve not shown my full speed yet.“I’m really enjoying my rugby at the moment. Everything has happened so quickly and I’m loving it.”Quite. And don’t expect his progress to slow down any time soon. As he said, he’s actually getting faster.last_img read more

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 13, 2012 Neil Armstrong smiles for the camera after returning to the Apollo II command module on July 20, 1969, after spending two-and-a-half hours on the moon.[Episcopal News Service] The United States honored “the first human being to walk on another world” at Washington National Cathedral Sept. 13 with a combination of Scripture, a voice from the past, tributes, traditional hymns and Frank Sinatra.Neil Armstrong, 82, “can now finally put out [his] hand and touch the face of God,” Eugene A. Cernan, the Apollo 17 mission commander and last man to walk on the moon, said during the service.Armstrong died Aug. 25 of complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures, according to a family statement. He had undergone heart bypass surgery earlier in August in Cincinnati, Ohio, near where he lived. A private memorial service was held there on Aug. 31.Armstrong, a Navy pilot, is to be buried at sea on Sept. 14. The location and details of that service have not been disclosed, however one version of such a service can be seen here.The cathedral was filled with people who heard Armstrong described during the service as a humble man who never sought the limelight, even after having made history by being the first person to set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong and co-pilot Col. Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. put their lunar landing craft, Eagle, down a rocky stretch of land near the southwestern shore of the moon’s Sea of Tranquility.The first Scripture reading during the service was Exodus 3:1-15 in which Moses is forever changed by his encounter with God in the burning bush. Diocese of Washington Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde said during her homily that most people assumed that Armstrong’s burning-bush moment were the two-and-a-half hours he spent on the moon.Washington National Cathedral’s Space Window has a small sliver of moon rock as its centerpiece. Neil Armstrong and fellow Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins presented the approximately 3.6 billion years-old basalt chip to the cathedral in 1974. Photo/Washington National CathedralHowever, she said, the astronaut downplayed that experience and instead often spoke about experiencing the fragile-appearing earth from his spacecraft. Armstrong, she said, worked “for the survival of the only planet we human beings call home.”NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. called Armstrong “a true American hero” and “a brave and humble servant who never stopped dreaming.”Cernan, who described Armstrong as a “world icon” and “the first human being to walk on another world,” said the astronaut called himself “the tip of the arrow” launched by the 400,000 NASA workers who, with the American people, gave him “the opportunity to call the moon his home.”Much was made at the time of how the fuel gauge on the lunar landing module was on empty before Armstrong and Aldrin landed the Eagle. Cernan said that when Armstrong was later asked about those moments, he’d reply “‘Well, when the gauge says empty we all know there is a gallon or two left over.’” The audience laughed as Cernan recalled the comment.He described how on each of three journeys he, Armstrong and fellow astronaut Jim Lovell made to Afghanistan and Iraq to visit soldiers, Armstrong was less concerned about his celebrity status than how the troops were faring.“He embodied all that is good and all that is great about America,” Cernan said.Former Secretary of the Treasury John W. Snow recalled the legend he knew as a friend and “a man with an unusually strong and clear sense of his calling in life” not as an astronaut but a Purdue University-trained engineer who wanted to improve flight.“I think he, indeed, had been put on earth to fly,” Snow said, calling Armstrong “the most reluctant of heroes.”Neil Armstrong speaks on the 50th anniversary of John Glenn’s first spaceflight in February 2012.Astronaut Michael Collins, now a retired Air Force major general who remained in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the moon, led the prayers during the service. He thanked God “for your servant Neil Armstrong, who with courage and humility first set foot upon the moon. Following his example, save us from arrogance, lest we forget that our achievements are grounded in you; and by the grace of your Holy Spirit, protect our travels beyond the reaches of the earth, that we may glory ever more in the wonder of your creation.”The service’s procession entered with the congregation singing “Praise, my soul, the king of heaven,” which includes the words “sun and moon, bow down before him, dwellers all in time and space.”The first reading was an audio recording of an excerpt from President John F. Kennedy’s so-called “moon speech” delivered on Sept. 12, 1962, at Rice University in Houston, Texas. During that speech, Kennedy called for landing an American on the moon before the end of the 1960s.“As we set sail we ask God’s blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked,” Kennedy said.The U.S. Navy Band’s Sea Chanters sang “Eternal Father, strong to save,” which is known as the Naval Hymn and is included in the Episcopal Church’s Hymnal 1982 as hymn 608 and later jazz singer-songwriter Diana Krall, seated at a grand piano, sang a quiet rendition of Frank Sinatra’s “Fly Me to the Moon.”At the beginning of her blessing, Budde told the congregation to “go forth into the world in peace; search the cosmos, it is the Lord’s; and may the God of all strength nerve you with the courage of the astronauts.”An on-demand video version of the Armstrong service is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 People The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Nation pays tribute to ‘world icon’ Neil Armstrong Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Obituary, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (1) Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Albany, NY Jeffrey Knox says: Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID September 14, 2012 at 9:55 am Eucharistic Prayer C. “This fragil earth, our island home…” In thanks giving for the life of Neil Armstrong. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI El sínodo general de la Iglesia de Inglaterra (Anglicana) aprobó recientemente nuevas propuestas para facilitar la ordenación de mujeres al episcopado, con 378 votos a favor, 8 en contra y 25 abstenciones. Se espera que para fines del 2014 se consagren las primeras mujeres.  El nigeriano Jude Thaddeus Okolo (56 años y sacerdote desde 1983), ha sido nombrado por el papa Francisco como nuevo nuncio en República Dominicana, a fin de sustituir al polaco Jozef Wesolowski, quien fuera retirado a causa de acusaciones de abuso sexual a menores, según informara el Vaticano.“La cruz cristiana se ha convertido poco más que una prenda cualquiera colgada del cuello de mucha gente, especialmente de los artistas”, dice el arzobispo de Cantórbery Justin Welby en el prólogo de un reciente libro sobre el Cristianismo. “Olvidamos que la cruz es el símbolo más importante de nuestra fe y que debe llevarse con reverencia y humildad” dice Welby. La cruz nos recuerda el sacrificio supremo de Cristo por amor a la humanidad.Ante los líderes de la Iglesia Católica Romana que afirman que en el norte de Nicaragua ya existen grupos armados opositores al gobierno de Daniel Ortega, con demandas políticas bien precisas, el mandatario ripostó que tales opiniones resultan falsas y atacó a ciertos obispos, a quienes calificó de “sembradores de cizaña”, los cuales, según él, “atizan la violencia y siembran odio”. El mandatario afirmó que “nunca jamás se volverá a derramar sangre entre los nicaragüenses, cuando lo que ha de prevalecer es el sentimiento de reconciliación por encima de todos aquellos que pretenden activar la violencia y el odio en este país”.Nicolás Maduro siempre tiene palabras ofensivas para referirse a la oposición. Tras uno de los recientes apagones en el país dijo “duro que me voy a poner para que lo sepan los pelucones, parásitos y burgueses. Al primero que salga a desconocer los resultados de las elecciones para crear violencia van directamente a ponerle los grilletes y va a pagar muy caro”. ¡Que viva la democracia del Siglo XXI!El Manual Diagnóstico y Estadístico de los Trastornos Mentales dice el trastorno psiquiátrico llamado pedofilia que se define como “una orientación sexual o preferencia sexual desprovista de consumación”, mientras que el desorden pedófilo se define como una compulsión en personas que usan así su sexualidad. Grupos cristianos temen que ocurra el mismo proceso que pasó con la homosexualidad que después de será catalogada como una enfermedad pasó a ser llamada “orientación sexual congénita”.La canóniga Melissa Skelton, rectora de la Iglesia Episcopal de San Pablo en Seattle, Washington, ha sido electa obispa de la diócesis de Nueva Westminster, una de las seis diócesis que conforman la Provincia de Columbia Británica, Canadá. Será consagrada el 1 de marzo de 2014.La llamada “Ola Latina” en Estados Unidos se refleja también en las iglesias. La diócesis episcopal de Dallas, Texas, tiene seis congregaciones de habla española informa el obispo sufragáneo Paul Lambert. “Tenemos una asistencia promedio de 1,170 personas cada domingo”, dice. Estudios demográficos en Texas revelan que hay un gran éxodo de católicos romanos a iglesias litúrgicas como la episcopal y la luterana.Como un “gesto generoso de hermandad”, ha sido calificado las palabras y oraciones del papa Francisco a favor de las 13 monjas ortodoxas recientemente secuestradas en Malula, Siria. Como venganza los  rebeldes deslizaron neumáticos llenos de explosivos al centro de la ciudad. Malula, símbolo de la presencia cristiana en Siria, constituye uno de los pocos lugares donde todavía se habla arameo, el idioma de Jesús. Las iglesias ortodoxas son el producto del  conflicto religioso de 1054 que produjo la mutua excomunión entre el papa y la cristiandad de Oriente.Según un informe de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe, las cifras de violencia contra la mujer “son alarmantes”. Las mujeres de América Latina son víctimas de la violencia de género hecho que debería ser objeto de vergüenza dijo Dilma Rousseff, presidenta de Brasil. “Todas las sociedades deberían luchar por ser más justas, ciudadanas y solidarias con la mujer, añadió. El 25 de noviembre ha sido designado como Día Internacional de la Eliminación de la Violencia contra la Mujer como recordatorio del asesinato de las hermanas Mirabal por el régimen de Trujillo en 1960.Como respuesta a la crítica de que el papa Francisco no le ha dado suficiente atención a los escándalos de abusos sexuales del clero, el cardenal Sean O’Malley de Boston dijo que pronto se producirá un informe de cómo proceder en estos casos.PARA PENSAR. Existen dos maneras de ser feliz en esta vida, una es hacerse el idiota, y la otra es serlo. Sigmund Freud, neurólogo austríaco (1856-1939). Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rapidísimas, Diciembre 6 de 2013 Por Onell A. Soto, [email protected] Dec 6, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Eventscenter_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_imgAward recognises Vicar of Baghdad’s reconciliation work Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion, Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Photo: Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East[Anglican Communion News Service] The Vicar of Baghdad, Canon Andrew White, will receive this year’s annual William Wilberforce Award in recognition of his outstanding service to Christianity internationally and his service to the Middle East. The judges stated that he, like Wilberforce, had taken great risks to bring about radical change in some of the most dangerous places in the world.Canon Andrew White not only leads one of the biggest churches in Iraq with a very large clinic and school, he also heads up major reconciliation work between the various sectarian groups in Iraq not least the Shia and Sunni. In addition to his work in Iraq he has been instrumental in also bringing various groups together in Israel and Palestine over many years. He recently hosted a remarkable meeting bringing together Iraqis, Israelis and Palestinians in Cyprus.“I am more honored and inspired with this award than any other award I have every received,” Canon White said. “I, like William Wilberforce, also used to live and work in Clapham in South West London. Almost every day I would pass the Church he attended, Holy Trinity, Clapham Common, and pray Lord make me like Wilberforce.“It is humbling to receive an award which honors the memory of one of the greatest statesmen ever and has been presented to such inspirational people as Cardinal Timothy Dolan last year.”The award organizers say that White was chosen as the recipient of the award because of his “extraordinary strides in reconciliation and restoration in the face of overwhelming challenges.”They continue: “He has built a positive relationship with the government and people of Iraq on every level, from grassroots to the business community to the military. Located in the city’s Red Zone, his church serves 6,000 Iraqi citizens each week — a stunning number for a country with a 97% Muslim population.The award will be presented at a dinner attended by over 1,000 people including many of the Generals and Ambassadors who served in Iraq, as part of the annual Wilberforce Weekend, which takes place this year between May 2-4 at Chantilly, Virginia, in the United States. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL People Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Posted Apr 25, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Middle East, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

first_img Mel Schlachter says: Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT March 16, 2016 at 8:28 pm So very sad to read of Barbara’s death. As a member of the Episcopal Women’s Caucus, I am so thankful for her leadership and love of the church. Rest in God’s holy Peace, Barbara . March 1, 2016 at 4:08 pm She was a great lady. Margaret Irwin says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (10) Karen (Lisby) Leugers says: E. F. Michael Morgan says: Susan Longo Cowperthwaite says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ March 2, 2016 at 9:20 pm Barbara was an inspiration to me. I am grateful. March 6, 2016 at 6:44 am Barbara was a joy to know as colleague and friend. Her down-home hospitality was extended to all sorts and conditions of people, teaching us the love of Christ by bold and courageous example. Posted Mar 1, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 18, 2016 at 12:16 pm So many memories of very powerful years and events, Carter. Nice to hear from you.Mel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab March 2, 2016 at 3:53 pm Barbara was a supportive mentor when I was exploring the call to ordained ministry in the early 1980’s. I continue to treasure her wise counsel about juggling my relationship with God, my responsibility to my family, and my obligations to the institutional church. I still have the bean bags representing those three commitments that were part of her charge to me at my ordination. I was blessed to count her as a friend and a colleague. This obituary is published here.Barbara Jeanne Hartley Schlachter died early Wednesday morning, February 17, after a battle with ovarian cancer. She was born August 10, 1945 to Jeanne Louise Sommer Hartley and Charles Beatty Hartley and grew up on the shores of Lake Erie on her grandfather’s fruit and vegetable farm. She attended elementary school in Huron and Centerville, Ohio and graduated from Huron High School in 1963. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1967. She did her graduate work at Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary, receiving an MA in history of religions in 1970 and her M.Div. in 1972. She received the Dr. of Min. degree in Ministry and Marriage and Family in 1988 from Eastern Baptist Seminary and was certified as a pastoral counselor by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors.Visitation was held on Sunday, Feb. 21 at Trinity Episcopal Church at Gilbert and College Streets in Iowa City. The service of burial was held on Feb. 22 at 11 a.m., also at Trinity Church.Barbara was one of the first women to be ordained to the Episcopal priesthood in 1977 and helped to found the Episcopal Women’s Caucus, serving as its first president. She served parishes in White Plains NY, Staatsburg NY, Troy OH and Cedar Rapids, IA. She gave her time to the church beyond the parish, serving both at the diocesan level and national level. Among other things she served on the Church Deployment Board, was the first ordained woman to serve on the Executive Council and chaired the Committee on the Status of Women.She married the Rev. Mel Schlachter on Aug. 24, 1968, and they had two children, Erika Hartley Schlachter Sward, and Jacob Hartley Hanson Schlachter. She is survived by them and by their spouses, David Sward and Laura Hanson Schlachter, and two grandchildren, Matthew and Colin Sward, in addition to her sister, Suzanne Hartley.After she retired from parish ministry, she continued her work as a pastoral counselor and spiritual director. She also went through training as a Healing Touch practitioner and saw her ministry in her later years as one of healer. Her final passion was the environment and healing the earth, especially climate change action. She was proud of being arrested at the White House for protesting the Keystone XL pipeline, and she co-founded Iowa City Climate Advocates and 100 Grannies for a Livable Future to educate, advocate and agitate about climate change.She was a breast cancer survivor who successfully went through treatment and lived another 17 years cancer free and was diagnosed in February 2015 with ovarian cancer. She loved reading and the beauty of the out-of-doors, and most of all she loved her family and is grateful to them and to all her friends who supported her in her journey.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation in memory of Barbara Schlachter to carry on her love for children and reading at 123 S. Linn St, Iowa City IA 52240 (www.icpl.org/support/donate), or to the Barbara Schlachter Fund c/o 100 Grannies for a Livable Future at 18 Valley View Knoll, NE, Iowa City, IA 52240. Mel Schlachter says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev. Christine Payden-Travers says: Rector Knoxville, TN RIP: Barbara Schlachter, one of the first female Episcopal priests Laurie Eiserloh says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 18, 2016 at 12:13 pm Thanks John. Glad to be reminded of those exciting years and struggles. And of you.Mel March 22, 2016 at 3:53 pm Barbara was key in starting an Ecumenical Food Pantry in Hyde Park, NY. I remember well baking and preparing meals in parishioners homes – including the rectory in Staatsburg. She also was instrumental in starting a Mother’s Day Out program for a group of us with young children. Rest peacefully, Barbara. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Obituary, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York March 3, 2016 at 7:59 pm What a sister! I’ll always be grateful for Barbara’s friendship and collegiality throughout our time in seminary together, the women’s ordination struggle, the Episcopal Women’s Caucus and Episcopal Women’s History Project. I was inspired and strengthened by the amazing journey we shared on this fragile planet, our island home. Godspeed, dear friend. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET John Baldwin says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Carter Heyward says: Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 1, 2016 at 4:29 pm Also a past president of NNECA (the National Network of Episcopal Clergy Associations) and a very effective advocate of clergy health and wellness….a lovely woman in so many ways. Rector Smithfield, NC People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_img Doug Desper says: July 3, 2018 at 8:40 am Yes, we DO need to listen. But, there is more than listening. Here is an article from Time Magazine that you might find of interest. http://time.com/5318965/how-to-win-an-argument/?utm_source=time.com&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=the-brief&utm_content=2018070310am&xid=newsletter-brief&eminfo=%7b%22EMAIL%22%3a%22LthVMVCfZhHzr%2fKUnC0yCMPZylZOlg0e%22%2c%22BRAND%22%3a%22TD%22%2c%22CONTENT%22%3a%22Newsletter%22%2c%22UID%22%3a%22TD_TBR_59005B69-BFF8-456D-9A87-F626827A90F3%22%2c%22SUBID%22%3a%2223996706%22%2c%22JOBID%22%3a%22808327%22%2c%22NEWSLETTER%22%3a%22THE_BRIEF%22%2c%22ZIP%22%3a%22%22%2c%22COUNTRY%22%3a%22USA%22%7d July 2, 2018 at 11:58 am Lou, I wholeheartedly reject that whites are inherently racist to the exclusion of all others. Your definition of “racism = race prejudice plus power” certainly sees more than white participation. I have experiences in social work that more than confirms that every race has prejudicial tendencies and all can find power over others when necessary to manipulate and have an advantage. The Rev. Paul Walker, rector of Christ Episcopal Church in Charlottesville, Virginia, talks to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry in front of the city’s statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in September. The statue had been shrouded in a tarp while the city dealt with challenges to its decision to remove the statue of the Confederate general. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Church leaders already had begun thinking about spiritual responses to racism in 2015 when a shock of events underscored the urgency of that discernment.A young white supremacist gunman with a fondness for the Confederate flag opened fire June 17, 2015, at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine people. That massacre, along with news reports of arsons at black churches and police shootings of unarmed black men, helped fuel passage at the 78th General Convention of Resolution C019, which called on church officers to develop a churchwide response to racial injustice, and up to $2 million was approved for that work.The Charleston massacre, in particular, left bishops and deputies “feeling a sense of shock and outrage because I don’t think they thought that that could happen in 2015,” Heidi Kim, staff officer for racial reconciliation, told Episcopal News Service.Kim had been on the job about a year at that time. Since then, she has helped lead a team of Episcopal Church staff members in carrying out the mandate of Resolution C019 through a framework agreed on by church officers, including Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, who was elected in 2015 as the church’s first black leader.The racial reconciliation team developed the framework into Becoming Beloved Community, which now is the centerpiece of the Episcopal Church’s racial reconciliation efforts. How to follow through with those efforts will be the core question before the Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee when it convenes at the 79th General Convention next week in Austin, Texas.But racism and racial healing are such big topics, both socially and spiritually, that the discussion is expected to expand well beyond a single resolution, or even a single committee, to include meetings, events and exhibits in all corners of the convention center from July 5 to 13.The Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care, delivers the keynote speech Jan. 17 at the All Our Children Conference in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“The world needs us to get serious about racial healing, reconciliation and justice,” the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, the presiding bishop’s canon for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care, said in an email. “That only happens as we tell the truth about our churches and race, proclaim the dream of Beloved Community, practice Jesus’ way of love with one another and repair the breach in our society and institutions.“I’m eager to see our church sharing the wisdom and resources to support even more local adaptation and engagement with this vision.”Resolution C019 was the most prominent in a series of resolutions on racism in 2015, and it was hardly General Convention’s first time addressing racism. Resolutions dating back decades have helped guide the church as it responds to racism and atones for its own complicity in racial injustice and support for racist systems, from slavery to segregation. The mandate in 2015 sought to carry those efforts a step further.“The abomination and sin of racism continue to plague our society and our Church at great cost to human life and human dignity; we formally acknowledge our historic and contemporary participation in this evil and repent of it,” C019 reads. Another resolution, A182, called on the church to address systemic racism at all levels.Racial reconciliation also was identified by General Convention in 2015 as one of three priorities for the 2016-18 triennium, along with evangelism and care of creation. All three priorities will be highlighted in Austin in three joint sessions of the upcoming General Convention.Those sessions, named TEConversations, will feature three-member panel discussions on each topic. The TEConversation on racial reconciliation will kick off the series on July 6, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, with panelists Catherine Meeks, who heads the Diocese of Atlanta’s anti-racism commission; the Rev. Nancy Frausto, a “Dreamer” from the Diocese of Los Angeles who was brought to the United States from Mexico as a child; and Arno Michaelis, an author and former skinhead. (The evangelism discussion is July 7. Care of creation will be the topic July 10.)Meeks also is founder of the Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing in Atlanta. The center will hold a luncheon on racial healing at noon on July 6 at the Hilton Hotel across the street from the Austin Convention Center.Other exhibits on racial healing are planned for the same day in the exhibit hall, Kim said.“It’s actually kind of an exciting time,” she said. “The convention will have an opportunity to talk about what it is we’re trying to engage in.” And she expects those conversations to be lively and illuminating, as well as instructive for the coming triennium.For example, one resolution before the Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee (B004) questions whether “anti-racism” should be replaced with a term that better encompasses the spiritual transformation sought in this work. Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Rob Wright is listed as the proposer.A resolution (A042) submitted separately by the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism seeks to change the committee’s name by adding “Reconciliation.” A companion resolution (A043) would adjust the committee’s mandate accordingly.Another resolution (A138) focuses on the church’s track record of diversifying its leadership. The resolution, submitted by the Task Force on the Episcopacy and assigned to the Churchwide Leadership Committee, would give dioceses 60 days after a bishop election to submit demographic info on all nominees.“Progress towards the church’s goals and aspirations in the diversity of its leadership, including bishops, is dependent to a significant extent on gathering critical data to inform plans to achieve those goals and be faithful to those aspirations,” the Task Force said.The church’s work on Becoming Beloved Community is detailed at length in the Blue Book report generated by church officers in response to Resolution C019 from 2015. Becoming Beloved Community is broken into four parts that are illustrated as a labyrinth: telling the truth about our churches and race, proclaiming the dream of Beloved Community, practicing the way of love in the pattern of Jesus and repairing the breach in society. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Frank Harrision says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Lou Schoen says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Frank Harrision says: June 30, 2018 at 8:53 pm Except, perhaps, for our attitude towards GAFCON and the Global South, I have never thought the Episcopal Church had a big problem with racism so I don’t get what all the hoopla is about. July 4, 2018 at 1:07 pm I’d like to see evidence for a claim like that (from mainstream, non-biased sources), because I am skeptical that the Nation of Islam is all that powerful, and I’m especially skeptical that it has the support of PB Curry (unless I misunderstood your post). And the effect of their hatred is no where near as systemic as white supremacy, which is one of our nation’s original sins. Should that group gain influence in any way, though, they should be called out and condemned as a hate group (as they have been labeled by the SPLC):https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate/extremist-files/group/nation-islam June 30, 2018 at 9:11 am Racism manifests itself in so many ways. It can be blatant or subtle. If you ask thirty people to define it, you could get 20 different answers. I think it’s like Justice Potter Stewart’s description of porn. I paraphrase, I can’t describe it, but I know it when I see it.” Racism is almost impossible to prove to a person determined not to see it. There is always a reason the person that experienced racism was treated poorly that is unrelated to race. June 29, 2018 at 11:25 pm This sentence from the article sounds like racial profiling to me!!! — “The resolution, submitted by the Task Force on the Episcopacy and assigned to the Churchwide Leadership Committee, would give dioceses 60 days after a bishop election to submit demographic info on all nominees.” Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Doug Desper says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 4, 2018 at 6:36 pm And what of black teens killing elderly white women? IF we are going to be fair, let us remember stories on both sides of the fence. NOW, of these stories, so what in the following sense. From the fact that some whites, some blacks, some whatever are morally horrible, it does not follow that all blacks, whites, whatevers are. Indeed, it does not even follow that the majority are. We cannot argue from the characteristics of the few to that of the whole. To attempt to do this is simply to indulge in The Fallacy of Composition. Let us attempt to be more rational and less emotional. This will be to the betterment of ALL concerned. Larry Waters says: July 3, 2018 at 3:47 pm Much of this belief that whites are “hated” is that for most of this country’s history Caucasians have done what they like to minorities, and minorities, especially Blacks could do nothing about it. Don’t like your Black child going to a school named after someone who fought a war to enslave them? Too bad. Don’t like going to a tax payer funded govt. building with a Confederate flag flying over it? Too bad! Tired of stereotypical negative depictions on tv or in movies. Too bad.For decades, Afr-Americans just had to take it. That is changing very, very slowly and that scares people. Any complaints about the the harm done to Black people because they are black is seen as a condemnation or hatred by (some) whites. Craig Kauffman says: July 7, 2018 at 8:38 pm Lots of counting coup going on. Perhaps working on our own sanctification in “fear and trembling” ( thanks St. Paul) would be more fruitful than spending time policing others. Somewhere awhile back someone said “Let me be the change I wish to see in others.” I thought God was the source of change, not us beating other people up. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI June 30, 2018 at 12:53 am I would like to see this goeven further .perhaps encourage every parish with a Vacancy to interview at least one person of color. That why more people of color are given opportunities to grow. Director of Music Morristown, NJ June 30, 2018 at 12:42 pm The more that I read about the efforts to reconcile with others in light of racism the more that I wonder why just that single symptom of the greater sin of elitism has been identified for action. Racism is but a symptom of an elitist’s disturbed heart. Checking off the box of “Anti-Racist” leaves whole topics undisturbed that should be disturbed. Few will admit that they are a racist and the moniker of “Ally” and “Anti-Racist” are the prizes of the day. However, look at how many among us will still talk disparagingly about people in rural areas, trailer parks, the South, “flyover country”, or those with a high school education or less. Elitism is not addressed when just a single symptom of it becomes the measure. Pointing at neo-Nazis, or neo-Confederates and rushing to pray and protest in front of them solves nothing, and likely reveals something about the one doing the confronting. Rushing into the mess of someone’s racial sin to call it out is itself dangerously close to the sin of elitism. Finding the splinter in the eye of a neo-Nazi is gratifying. We found a racist! But…what about the board sticking out of our own eye? A board that bears some examining. For while the sin of racism has been found, was there not something also wrong with the pride and satisfaction to find it and call it out? That, friends, is the sin of elitism. Work for social justice. Do not get into the splinter-finding business. It will reveal ourselves. Alec Whispers says: July 4, 2018 at 10:55 am Mr. Sakal, thank you for your response. I could say Google, Huff Post, NY Times, Chicago Tribune etc. are all totally biased against conservatives. And I could also agree with Charles Vok about the systemic oppression of whites, which you say is not true. The problem is that we all have our views, which are true in our thinking. As I mentioned in a previous post, this attempt to “best” each other is NOT going to work. And there will always be evil,bigoted, mean spirited people in the world; it is sadly, a human trait. As I said in the last line of a previous post, goodwill/good intentions must come from all sides. Frank Harrision says: Frank Harrision says: Frank Harrision says: Alec Whispers says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 3, 2018 at 2:04 pm Charles, There is no “systemic oppression” or “systemic hatred” of whites in American society. Society on the whole is just coming to recognise the great imbalance of privileges and rights afforded to whites based upon the colour of their skin. As an example, look at how white gunmen are treated by the police (they tend to be taken away in handcuffs and are less often to be roughed up by the police. Compare that to how people of colour are treated by the police and you have an example (one of many)of white privilege. What do you say to that? That framework was finalized in early 2017, Kim said, and it was released to the church that May. About half of the $2 million approved for this work has been spent so far to implement Becoming Beloved Community at the diocesan and congregation levels, and implementation is expected to continue in the new triennium, Kim said.Becoming Beloved Community is referenced by the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism in its resolutions assigned to the Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee. The stated aim of Resolution A044 is “building capacity for Becoming Beloved Community,” and it recommends a certification framework for the anti-racism training that was mandated by a 2000 resolution. The Committee on Anti-Racism also submitted a resolution to this General Convention (A045) clarifying that training requirement and reminding dioceses of it. And it is proposing a racial reconciliation awards program (A046) to recognize successful local efforts.Resolution D002 would approve $1 million to provide grants to local ministries engaged in racial reconciliation work. That kind of direct financial support is not included in the scope of the past resolutions that produced and have supported Becoming Beloved Community.Leona Volk greets Presiding Bishop Michael Curry during Curry’s September 2016 visit to South Dakota, where Episcopalians were involved in demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe importance of such efforts has been punctuated over the past three years by the continued shock of current events, from high-profile police shootings to the violent clashes last year in Charlottesville, Virginia, between white supremacist groups and counterprotesters. Kim said she also sees the need for racial healing in how Americans respond to migrants at the Mexican border. And environmental issues often are interwoven with race, as seen in the Standing Rock Sioux’s fight to preserve the tribe’s drinking water and Native Alaskan efforts to protect caribou breeding grounds in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.She also hopes Episcopalians will embrace the work of racial reconciliation as a personal spiritual journey, not as a way to shame those whom we may see as racist.“We all have our own work to do, so we can’t just externalize the problem of racism,” she said. “We all can be better at being reconcilers and healers.”Spellers said she finds hope in the visionary work of General Convention in measures such as Resolution C019 from 2015, and she expects that vision to carry the church through the next two weeks of discernment on systemic racism.“When I look to our church’s work so recently begun toward Becoming Beloved Community, and when I hear today’s fierce racial justice and healing conversations among bishops, deputies and dedicated networks — I am deeply encouraged,” Spellers said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Mark Bigley says: July 3, 2018 at 5:12 pm Mr. Ouellette and Mr. Whispers, I believe that both of you were addressing me, Larry Waters, though neither of you said so. Particularly to you Mr. Whispers, I said in my comment that people are always going to be bigoted and that there will always be evil in our world. And Mr. Ouellette, I can respond to you that all of us are beneficiaries of a society that was not only built on Black labor, but Chinese, Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian [in general]American Indian etc. The main idea in my comment was treat other people the way we would like to be treated; that idea [of course it’s Love thy neighbor etc.] would/could have avoided many of the injustices that Mr. Whispers alluded to. My take-away from both of your comments, is that discussion is pointless/hopeless. Matt Ouellette says: July 2, 2018 at 12:36 pm PLEASE do not think that this is a silly question, but specifically what is this “Jesus Movement” referred to by the PB? Do not be vague as in saying such things as “Living as Jesus lived,” or “Doing what Jesus did.” As is commonly known, these sorts of comments lead to all manner of varying interpretations. So, specifically what is the Jesus Movement envisioned by the PB? THANKS! Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 3, 2018 at 8:37 am Racism is a specific form of bigotry, one regarding racial differences. White supremacy is only one form of racism. I don’t think anyone here has suggested being white automatically means you are racist. What is often brought up is that whites are the most privileged racial group in America on a societal level, and therefore often benefit from a system that privileges them over other racial groups. For example, white Americans today are not responsible for slavery, but we are the beneficiaries of a society that was built on the backs of African slaves and should be aware of the long-lasting repercussions (social and economic) that has on the descendants of those slaves. July 5, 2018 at 6:18 am How can there be systemic oppression against the ruling class? By it’s very nature, that is an impossibility. Whites control every major institution in this country. Even when we had a bi-racial President, he was still a cog in a wheel designed by, run by, and to benefit white people.There is not a single societal indicator where whites don’t do significantly better than African-Americans. Even Affirmative Action, conceived as a way to allow non-whites more opportunity,has garnered the most benefits to white woman.I hear so many examples in which white people are told “We would have hired you, but we had to hire a black person”. (Yet, the alleged victim never sues or tells the media). Even if that were true, it’s not systemic, nor pervasive.Are there Blacks more successful than Whites in America? Yes. Some are extremely wealthy and powerful. Are there laws, policies, and traditions intertwined in the very fabric of this country to benefit minorities over whites? No. Have whites used the law, policies, and customs to give themselves an advantage over minorities, especially Black people? Yes. “There are lots of reasons that whites have so much more wealth than nonwhites. How the GI Bill played out is one of those reasons. Whites were able to use the government guaranteed housing loans that were a pillar of the bill to buy homes in the fast growing suburbs. Those homes subsequently rose greatly in value in coming decades, creating vast new household wealth for whites during the postwar era. But black veterans weren’t able to make use of the housing provisions of the GI Bill for the most part. Banks generally wouldn’t make loans for mortgages in black neighborhoods, and African-Americans were excluded from the suburbs by a combination of deed covenants and informal racism. ”http://www.demos.org/blog/11/11/13/how-gi-bill-left-out-african-americans July 5, 2018 at 6:43 pm They made it abundantly clear that their political opinions were God’s opinions and that anyone who disagreed was morally deficient and not welcome. That is bigotry. It is also probably idolatry when you decide that your political views are God’s political views. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 8, 2018 at 3:19 pm “The definition is: “racism = race prejudice plus power.” Under that definition, in American culture, all of us defined as “white” are inherently, culturally racist. ” Racism, I believe is a personal flaw. The definition noted is interesting in that it excludes the personal and very intentionally refers to “power” and that white’s are culturally racist. I submit that holding that believe is racist in itself as it paints all the individuals in the group as racist. Not having power does not exclude one from racist views. If you are human, you have the capacity for racism. If you claim you don’t because you have no “power”, you are not human. This does have a precedent in Marxist views and is a practical tool for creating class unrest. Reconciliation starts with learning to see and experience someone’s spirit, not their skin tone. Maybe a perspective of “We are souls that happen to have temporary bodies.” Expecting, and really believing that there is a whole world of racists out there is racist. See the God and expect the God in everyone. We know for sure that it is there. You know that is The Way. If someone tries to convince you that you are racist, but you just don’t know it, you are not being “woke”, you are being conned. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 3, 2018 at 7:55 am I’m interested to see how the Church handles the growing hatred of whites in our society. There needs to be a response to this. Alec Whispers says: July 3, 2018 at 8:08 am “Racism [bigotry] has NOTHING to do with power, but everything to do with how we treat each other. White people are not more or less bigoted than any other ethnicity. And to keep trying to ascribe to white people that they are the only “racists” [bigots] is the height of lies and hypocrisy.”The outcome of racism has much to do with power. Compared to white people, African-Americans have very little power. African-Americans have never banded together and passed laws disenfranchising white people. We’ve never forced an entire population of Caucasians out of a town, whites have forced Blacks out of towns numerous times.Stop and Frisk, gerrymandering, redlining, those stupid confederate statues in the public square, are all things Black people don’t like that negatively effect us that we can’t do much about because Whites have the power. Even Affirmative-Action, which was supposed to help minorities, benefits White Women the most. Jordan Sakal says: July 2, 2018 at 8:25 am I agree with your comment. My observation, however, is strictly a logical one focusing on definitions which are too broad or too narrow, Used in arguments, explanations, and the like, they often generate circularity and this is not at all helpful in seeking the truth of the matter IF we are interested in seeking the truth of the matter. Larry Waters says: Featured Events Matt Ouellette says: Matt Ouellette says: Alec Whispers says: July 2, 2018 at 8:18 am I don’t see why a racial designation would be included in the definition. Any person can be racist to another person. However, on a societal level, it’s ethnic minorities that are typically victims of racism. Charles Vok says: Featured Jobs & Calls Jordan Sakal says: July 3, 2018 at 1:02 pm I just don’t see a systemic hatred of whites that you and other conservatives claim to see. I see a criticism of white privilege in society at large, which I think should be criticized. There is a sense of rage from racial minorities against certain whites who abuse their privileges to make life harder for minorities (e.g. calling the cops on African-Americans who are selling water on the street, staying at an Airbnb, or simply mowing the lawn), but their rage is understandable given the effect that abuse has on their lives and the lives of their relatives. Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: Submit a Job Listing Doug Desper says: By David PaulsenPosted Jun 29, 2018 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 4, 2018 at 11:36 am How much or how little hatred matters, then, Matt? Please don’t be so dismissive of the hate group of Nation of Islam. It is bigger and more active than any single white supremacist group that became the magnet for Episcopal activists including a visit by the Presiding Bishop. Matt Ouellette says: Frank Harrison says: Submit an Event Listing Frank Harrison says: John Hobart says: Frank Harrision says: July 4, 2018 at 1:09 am Mr. Waters,You really wish me to do your dirty work for you by Googling various and sundry amounts of police brutality and attacks by the police on unarmed black people? I take it then that you challenge the very existence of the racial nature of these attacks? From the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/17/us/black-deaths-police.htmlFrom Miami: http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/six-miami-police-brutality-cases-besides-the-kicking-video-10322438I could keep citing and finding examples for you, but I’m sure you can Google them yourself. Here are some more articles detailing how white criminals/gunmen are treated differently compared to people of colour.https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/03/in-texas-and-maryland-white-killers-receive-more-sympathy-than-black-victims.htmlhttps://www.google.com/amp/www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-austin-bomber-racial-empathy-gap-20180323-story,amp.htmlhttps://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_59c14adbe4b0f22c4a8cf212https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_59d3da15e4b04b9f92058316/ampAs you can see there are scores news articles describing the racist way in which our media and our police services treat people of colour. There is of course no excuse for this yet it shamefully continues. Mr. Winters, my original commentary was not directed at you and I’m actually interested in why you chose to reply when my comments were directed at Charles. Charles with the one who claimed that there is systemic oppression of white people now in society when the reality couldn’t be further from the truth. I do apologise if my comments were taken in any meanness by yourself, as I mentioned, my comments were for Charles and maybe they got shuffled around on the thread here.Have a good day, Mr. Sakal Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 4, 2018 at 2:51 pm Mr. Waters, My point in providing you those linked sources was to create for you the proof that you so eagerly sought. Charles Vok was the gentleman who claimed that there was systemic oppression of whites going on. I provided evidence (biased if you would like to think it, I would like you to provide other evidence in that case.) which indicated that the treatment of people of colour (hereafter POC) by police and others (the media) is racially tinged and biased against POC. You are correct in thinking that you suffer from confirmation bias. You are choosing to disbelief what I am providing evidence for, which is of course your own perogative. (Evidence mind you, that is especially valid given there is videographic proof of these attacks and situations which occur to POC.)I am not seeking to “best” you, again my initial comments were not directed at you (rather they were directed to Charles) I seek merely to educate Charles on the fact that oppression of whites which he claims is not as valid as he thinks. July 3, 2018 at 1:24 pm Matt: we have whole marches, protests, vigils, letters, sermons, speeches, and interdenominational cooperation which frequently calls out “white supremacy” and rightly so. I have never once – ever – heard an utterance from the PB or any other official which calls out or challenges the rabid and hateful speeches Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam – an exclusively African American organization of no small size. That organization peddles racism with every word and action and has never once been mentioned for their institutional hatred of whites. Matt Ouellette says: Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Matt Ouellette says: July 4, 2018 at 11:08 am You say, “The problem is that we all have our views, which are true in our thinking.” Exactly. This is a deep seated moral relativism. What is true is what I believe to be true. But, what I believe to be true is NO evidence that it is true no matter how strongly I hold it to be true. In my beliefs I may well be wrong. (This is one reason why I NEED others to help me against myself.) Nor is something true because a good many people hold it to be true and even true over long periods of time. That is merely another form of relativism. So, a question for each of us is are we pleased with such relativism or do we want to seek the truth which is independent (as far as evidence for is concerned) of what I believe to be the truth? If we are pleased with relativism, then then only thing that each, or groups, can do is to pronounce their beliefs and shout at those who have different beliefs. If we do not want to do this but rather to seek the truth, then we have to recognize that this is hard work which we cannot do along and which must be done in the light of the laws of rational thought. Here we do have a fundamental choice to make and stick with. July 1, 2018 at 2:01 pm There has long been a basic definition of racism in very wide use in racial justice training (including the anti-racism training in TEC before the 2010 budget struggle cancelled all national ministries). The definition is: “racism = race prejudice plus power.” Under that definition, in American culture, all of us defined as “white” are inherently, culturally racist. That morally obligates every one of us to do some in-depth personal as well as cultural and institutional study and action to change our inherently corrupt, racist system. There has been significant change, sometimes, but it has tended repeatedly to be challenged by resistance and backlash. Please, TEC & 2018 GC: Keep up the good work you’ve laid out for yourselves and for all of us! July 5, 2018 at 4:13 pm Where the priests saying “conservatives are not welcome in our church?” Because that would be political bigotry. However, if the priests were merely sharing their own views on politics which certain parishioners disagreed with and decided to leave the congregation over, that’s not bigotry. That’s the parishioners not wanting to listen to contrary points of view. Larry Waters says: Alec Whispers says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC June 29, 2018 at 2:59 pm The first thing to do in such a conversation is to define “racism” so that it is not too broad, too narrow, not contradictory, not circular, etc. In many instances, the term has become a highly emotional, negative, and rhetorical word with little to no cognitive meaning. Nor will it suffice merely to attempt to give examples to try “to define” the term. Ostensive definitions are weak. One can always legitimately ask why is THIS an acceptable example of “x” and THAT is not. I seriously believe that racism is a most important issue and cannot be allowed to flounder on the level of emotions and beliefs. July 3, 2018 at 7:46 am The difficulty comes in getting people to agree to a definition. Even if you go by Webster’s definition, Dictionary.com probably has a different definition. I.E. If a white woman only dates Asian guys is she racist or is that just a preference? I say preference, others say racist. What if she won’t date white guys, but loves her father and siblings? Is that racist?I think more important than a definition is a willingness to just listen. In an issue this emotional, people tend to get defensive, often before the speaker has completed their speech. Sadly, the people most willing to discuss the issue probably aren’t the problem. Youth Minister Lorton, VA John Hobart says: July 5, 2018 at 8:49 am If you enter “bigotry” at the Google prompt, the following definition is returned: “intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.” Based on that simple definition, I would suggest that the Episcopal Church has an enormous problem with bigotry, but not necessarily with racism. July 3, 2018 at 8:26 pm The Nation of Islam has very little power or influence in society. The outlandish statements and positions of a fringe group like that is not a sign of institutional hatred of whites in greater American society. July 5, 2018 at 9:50 am I don’t think that is a very good definition of the word. Here is a better definition from Merriam-Webster of the word “bigot”: “a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices; especially : one who regards or treats the members of a group (such as a racial or ethnic group) with hatred and intolerance.” It’s not just about people who disagree with you, but includes hatred based on race and ethnicity. And I would say that, while TEC does need to do a better job at allowing for differences of opinions, it is FAR better than other denominations (e.g. Roman Catholic, Southern Baptist) of allowing its members to hold to a diverse range of opinions, within reason (you can’t disagree on gay marriage, for example, in the Roman Catholic Church or Southern Baptist churches without being excommunicated). July 4, 2018 at 7:48 am Dear Mr. Desper — YOU are in a position, through your profession to see many things. Remember, though, that humans are, by nature, social beings, We gather into groups from the moment of birth, and are formulated in those groups. It is only natural that we are “suspicious” of other groups and especially those who appear to be far removed from us in our own values. But, is this racism, elitism, bigotry, or the like? Thanks for your comments. July 5, 2018 at 12:48 pm The Roman Catholics and Southern Baptists are somewhat beyond the sphere of my influence. In my parish we have never lost a parishioner due to racial and ethnic intolerance, to the best of my knowledge, since I have been attending. We have lost quite a few due to the political bigotry of some clergy. From a church vitality standpoint, it doesn’t matter that they weren’t excommunicated. Matt Ouellette says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska General Convention 2018, Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (52) Doug Desper says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA General Convention, July 9, 2018 at 9:58 am Thank you, Mr. Hobart for these insights which are all too often forgotten. Idolatry comes in various forms and those who practice it are often the first to deny that they are doing sol John Hobart says: Frank Harrision says: July 9, 2018 at 5:53 pm I think the whole argument has been aired here in a quite intelligent way. I do think some thoughts expressed here where remembering. “Elitist,” “judgemental,” and “Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.” Elitism we can understand. What is meant by racism is nebulous at best. I live in a minority community. I am called “brother” by my neighbor and we all seem to be a contented community. I go to a church with a number of black people. Both white people and black people in my church seem to go out of their way to show kindness, thoughtfulness, and Christian love to one another. What each of us need is to “work out our own salvation with fear and trembling,” as Mark has said, we end up in the right Christian relationship to one another. Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Frank Harrision says: July 3, 2018 at 8:51 am Yes, getting people to agree on a definition can be difficult. But, suppose that we accept common standards for “acceptable definitions.” For instance, suppose I defined “university” as a place of learning? Hopefully someone would point out that this is far too broad a definition; for instance, it includes kindergarten and high school. On the other hand, one could also point out that the definition is too narrow for it excluded “online learning.” These are issues of “correct form” of a definition. After all of this is settled might we then move to the acceptability of the “material content” of the definition. Then there is another matter to be considered in doing all of this and that is the definition itself and then its application in particular circumstances. Of course, listening to the other is vital in ALL of this. One reason is that no one of us is perfect. Presume that we are seekers of truth — the success of this seeking demands the help of others, even those, perhaps especially those, who do not agree with us. Not so if we are seekers of power. But, that is another matter entirely. Thanks for your comments. Frank Harrision says: Larry Waters says: July 1, 2018 at 4:01 pm The racial justice definition you provided is valid in the aggregate, but problematic on an basis. If an Indian man tells his daughter her Black friend is not welcome in his home (but a white friend is), is he not racist? It’s somewhat rare, but sometimes a non-white is in charge. There is definitely a racial hierarchy in America and white have the numerical and financial power, but they aren’t the only group to have the sin of racism. Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Mark Bigley says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Frank Harrision says: Racial Justice & Reconciliation July 3, 2018 at 8:27 am It’s not that whites are more prejudiced than blacks individually. It’s that our society, in America, privileges the racial prejudices of whites far more than it does those of any other race. That’s why white racism is a bigger problem in America. It’s more systemic and has much deeper roots in our nation’s history (e.g. slavery, segregation, incarceration bias, stop and frisk, racial profiling, etc.). Discussing the racial prejudices of other racial groups against whites in America is less of an issue because they don’t have as much of an impact on the living standards of white Americans on a societal level. Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Alec Whispers says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Matt Ouellette says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 1, 2018 at 6:10 am Indeed, various people have various notions of what the think “racism” to mean.” This is one of the major reasons that there needs to be some definition held in common before a meaningful discussion can be had. Of course, there may be long discussions needed to come, let me say, to at least a “working” definition of racism.” Otherwise, those in that discussion are going to be talking around one another, misunderstanding one another, getting frustrated with one another, and so on. So, discussions must begin, I venture to say, with a willingness to understand whatever it is that one is discussing with someone. Certainly, willingness to understand is not the same as accepting. But, a definition and the work coming to that definition is a vital part of the discussion. Otherwise, the danger of ending in chaos looms large. July 1, 2018 at 8:03 am Perhaps because of the harm racism has done to our country and our species. How many lives have been destroyed or ended because of a person’s skin color. It’s fine to be concerned about people who live in rural areas, trailer parks, the South, “flyover country”, being talked about disparagingly, but the division and discord created by their existence is nothing compared to the hate aimed at people because of their race.Are people being denied jobs because they are from the south? Have church bodies split because someone from flyover country wanted to join the congregation? Do schools have segregated proms because the kids who don’t live in trailer parks want a separate prom from people who do? Racism and slavery nearly divided this country in half. Racism permeates every institution in this country in a negative manner. It needs to be rectified. Rector Martinsville, VA July 1, 2018 at 8:33 am It is not racist to criticize homophobia in the Global South. We should call it out regardless of where it is found, because the LGBTQ+ people in Africa will suffer the consequences of such hate. Alec Whispers says: July 2, 2018 at 8:05 am Is “racism” to be so defined as it applies only to whites? If so, then many of the “arguments” and examples using “racism” in ways “against” whites become, at best circular or “true by definition,” This may well have strong rhetorical effects, most fallacies do, but little to do with the truth of the matter if it is truth being sought. July 7, 2018 at 8:24 pm Hopefully the Gospel is preached instead of politics. They are not the same. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 2, 2018 at 3:58 pm “Racism” spoken here is really bigotry, but racism has such a catchy ring to it! If a green bell pepper is ugly to a red bell pepper because the pepper is red, then that is bigotry, what most of the commenters call racism. If the green bp thinks that he is superior to the red bp because he is green, then that is racism. Mr. Schoen’s “definition” is worded that way because he seeks a particular outcome, the same way lawyers phrase things in court to try to sway a jury. Racism [bigotry] has NOTHING to do with power, but everything to do with how we treat each other. White people are not more or less bigoted than any other ethnicity. And to keep trying to ascribe to white people that they are the only “racists” [bigots] is the height of lies and hypocrisy. People, being people, are always going to be bigoted, sadly. There will always be evil in our world, though we wish otherwise. I am sad that slavery has existed almost always. But I had nothing to do with slavery and I am not going to accept being told that I am a racist because I am Caucasian. If the EC believes that, then I will leave the EC and label them as one of the most hypocritical groups around; they would not be a religious denomination but a hate group! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Jerry Williams says: Rector Albany, NY July 9, 2018 at 8:32 pm Just what constitutes “elitism”? The word is used a good deal in a derogatory sense, but is this appropriate? For instance, IF elitism is admitting that someone is better that someone else in a given area, then what is wrong with that. MY physicians are far better than I am in the practice of medical science/art. Of course, someone may claim that she is better than someone else in a given area and yet not be. I would not call such an attitude one of elitism but rather, perhaps, snobbery. So, just what is elitism? Omar Reyes says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Alec Whispers says: Jordan Sakal says: Rector Bath, NC General Convention prepares for expansive conversations on racism, racial healing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA John Hobart says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 4, 2018 at 5:24 pm Recently a white woman yelled at some black teens visiting a neighborhood pool. She even assaulted one of the teens. When the police went to arrest her, the woman pushed one detective into the wall and bit another on the arm. Had it been one of the teens assaulting the officers I imagine the child would be beaten at best or dead. Considering an unarmed Black person a threat and ending their life for selling cigarettes while white people have assaulted cops and worse, yet are taken into custody is the epitome of racism.http://www.startribune.com/white-woman-charged-with-assaulting-black-teen-at-pool/486715771/ Alec Whispers says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 4, 2018 at 12:15 am To Jordan Sakal: Mr. or Ms. Sakal, please cite specific examples of points that you are trying to illustrate about the police. This back and forth and trying to “best” each other reminds me of the old “Hatfields/McCoy feud”, if you are familiar with that story. If we are going to try to heal the racial breech, this ” ain’t” the way to do it. Some previous commenters are understandably angry/upset over past treatment of various minorities in our country. I certainly don’t condone that treatment, I condemn that treatment and as person who is trying to be Christian, don’t understand how that treatment came to be. But blaming me for wrongs that happened in the past and that I nothing to do with, is not something that I will accept. You push me and I push back; you swing at me and I swing at you; then the situation escalates. Perhaps a better way to heal the breech is to try to treat each other justly and equitably and “love thy neighbor” etc. Goodwill/good intentions must come from all sides. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more