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first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 13, 2012 Neil Armstrong smiles for the camera after returning to the Apollo II command module on July 20, 1969, after spending two-and-a-half hours on the moon.[Episcopal News Service] The United States honored “the first human being to walk on another world” at Washington National Cathedral Sept. 13 with a combination of Scripture, a voice from the past, tributes, traditional hymns and Frank Sinatra.Neil Armstrong, 82, “can now finally put out [his] hand and touch the face of God,” Eugene A. Cernan, the Apollo 17 mission commander and last man to walk on the moon, said during the service.Armstrong died Aug. 25 of complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures, according to a family statement. He had undergone heart bypass surgery earlier in August in Cincinnati, Ohio, near where he lived. A private memorial service was held there on Aug. 31.Armstrong, a Navy pilot, is to be buried at sea on Sept. 14. The location and details of that service have not been disclosed, however one version of such a service can be seen here.The cathedral was filled with people who heard Armstrong described during the service as a humble man who never sought the limelight, even after having made history by being the first person to set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong and co-pilot Col. Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. put their lunar landing craft, Eagle, down a rocky stretch of land near the southwestern shore of the moon’s Sea of Tranquility.The first Scripture reading during the service was Exodus 3:1-15 in which Moses is forever changed by his encounter with God in the burning bush. Diocese of Washington Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde said during her homily that most people assumed that Armstrong’s burning-bush moment were the two-and-a-half hours he spent on the moon.Washington National Cathedral’s Space Window has a small sliver of moon rock as its centerpiece. Neil Armstrong and fellow Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins presented the approximately 3.6 billion years-old basalt chip to the cathedral in 1974. Photo/Washington National CathedralHowever, she said, the astronaut downplayed that experience and instead often spoke about experiencing the fragile-appearing earth from his spacecraft. Armstrong, she said, worked “for the survival of the only planet we human beings call home.”NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr. called Armstrong “a true American hero” and “a brave and humble servant who never stopped dreaming.”Cernan, who described Armstrong as a “world icon” and “the first human being to walk on another world,” said the astronaut called himself “the tip of the arrow” launched by the 400,000 NASA workers who, with the American people, gave him “the opportunity to call the moon his home.”Much was made at the time of how the fuel gauge on the lunar landing module was on empty before Armstrong and Aldrin landed the Eagle. Cernan said that when Armstrong was later asked about those moments, he’d reply “‘Well, when the gauge says empty we all know there is a gallon or two left over.’” The audience laughed as Cernan recalled the comment.He described how on each of three journeys he, Armstrong and fellow astronaut Jim Lovell made to Afghanistan and Iraq to visit soldiers, Armstrong was less concerned about his celebrity status than how the troops were faring.“He embodied all that is good and all that is great about America,” Cernan said.Former Secretary of the Treasury John W. Snow recalled the legend he knew as a friend and “a man with an unusually strong and clear sense of his calling in life” not as an astronaut but a Purdue University-trained engineer who wanted to improve flight.“I think he, indeed, had been put on earth to fly,” Snow said, calling Armstrong “the most reluctant of heroes.”Neil Armstrong speaks on the 50th anniversary of John Glenn’s first spaceflight in February 2012.Astronaut Michael Collins, now a retired Air Force major general who remained in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the moon, led the prayers during the service. He thanked God “for your servant Neil Armstrong, who with courage and humility first set foot upon the moon. Following his example, save us from arrogance, lest we forget that our achievements are grounded in you; and by the grace of your Holy Spirit, protect our travels beyond the reaches of the earth, that we may glory ever more in the wonder of your creation.”The service’s procession entered with the congregation singing “Praise, my soul, the king of heaven,” which includes the words “sun and moon, bow down before him, dwellers all in time and space.”The first reading was an audio recording of an excerpt from President John F. Kennedy’s so-called “moon speech” delivered on Sept. 12, 1962, at Rice University in Houston, Texas. During that speech, Kennedy called for landing an American on the moon before the end of the 1960s.“As we set sail we ask God’s blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked,” Kennedy said.The U.S. Navy Band’s Sea Chanters sang “Eternal Father, strong to save,” which is known as the Naval Hymn and is included in the Episcopal Church’s Hymnal 1982 as hymn 608 and later jazz singer-songwriter Diana Krall, seated at a grand piano, sang a quiet rendition of Frank Sinatra’s “Fly Me to the Moon.”At the beginning of her blessing, Budde told the congregation to “go forth into the world in peace; search the cosmos, it is the Lord’s; and may the God of all strength nerve you with the courage of the astronauts.”An on-demand video version of the Armstrong service is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 People The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Nation pays tribute to ‘world icon’ Neil Armstrong Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Obituary, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (1) Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Albany, NY Jeffrey Knox says: Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID September 14, 2012 at 9:55 am Eucharistic Prayer C. “This fragil earth, our island home…” In thanks giving for the life of Neil Armstrong. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI El sínodo general de la Iglesia de Inglaterra (Anglicana) aprobó recientemente nuevas propuestas para facilitar la ordenación de mujeres al episcopado, con 378 votos a favor, 8 en contra y 25 abstenciones. Se espera que para fines del 2014 se consagren las primeras mujeres.  El nigeriano Jude Thaddeus Okolo (56 años y sacerdote desde 1983), ha sido nombrado por el papa Francisco como nuevo nuncio en República Dominicana, a fin de sustituir al polaco Jozef Wesolowski, quien fuera retirado a causa de acusaciones de abuso sexual a menores, según informara el Vaticano.“La cruz cristiana se ha convertido poco más que una prenda cualquiera colgada del cuello de mucha gente, especialmente de los artistas”, dice el arzobispo de Cantórbery Justin Welby en el prólogo de un reciente libro sobre el Cristianismo. “Olvidamos que la cruz es el símbolo más importante de nuestra fe y que debe llevarse con reverencia y humildad” dice Welby. La cruz nos recuerda el sacrificio supremo de Cristo por amor a la humanidad.Ante los líderes de la Iglesia Católica Romana que afirman que en el norte de Nicaragua ya existen grupos armados opositores al gobierno de Daniel Ortega, con demandas políticas bien precisas, el mandatario ripostó que tales opiniones resultan falsas y atacó a ciertos obispos, a quienes calificó de “sembradores de cizaña”, los cuales, según él, “atizan la violencia y siembran odio”. El mandatario afirmó que “nunca jamás se volverá a derramar sangre entre los nicaragüenses, cuando lo que ha de prevalecer es el sentimiento de reconciliación por encima de todos aquellos que pretenden activar la violencia y el odio en este país”.Nicolás Maduro siempre tiene palabras ofensivas para referirse a la oposición. Tras uno de los recientes apagones en el país dijo “duro que me voy a poner para que lo sepan los pelucones, parásitos y burgueses. Al primero que salga a desconocer los resultados de las elecciones para crear violencia van directamente a ponerle los grilletes y va a pagar muy caro”. ¡Que viva la democracia del Siglo XXI!El Manual Diagnóstico y Estadístico de los Trastornos Mentales dice el trastorno psiquiátrico llamado pedofilia que se define como “una orientación sexual o preferencia sexual desprovista de consumación”, mientras que el desorden pedófilo se define como una compulsión en personas que usan así su sexualidad. Grupos cristianos temen que ocurra el mismo proceso que pasó con la homosexualidad que después de será catalogada como una enfermedad pasó a ser llamada “orientación sexual congénita”.La canóniga Melissa Skelton, rectora de la Iglesia Episcopal de San Pablo en Seattle, Washington, ha sido electa obispa de la diócesis de Nueva Westminster, una de las seis diócesis que conforman la Provincia de Columbia Británica, Canadá. Será consagrada el 1 de marzo de 2014.La llamada “Ola Latina” en Estados Unidos se refleja también en las iglesias. La diócesis episcopal de Dallas, Texas, tiene seis congregaciones de habla española informa el obispo sufragáneo Paul Lambert. “Tenemos una asistencia promedio de 1,170 personas cada domingo”, dice. Estudios demográficos en Texas revelan que hay un gran éxodo de católicos romanos a iglesias litúrgicas como la episcopal y la luterana.Como un “gesto generoso de hermandad”, ha sido calificado las palabras y oraciones del papa Francisco a favor de las 13 monjas ortodoxas recientemente secuestradas en Malula, Siria. Como venganza los  rebeldes deslizaron neumáticos llenos de explosivos al centro de la ciudad. Malula, símbolo de la presencia cristiana en Siria, constituye uno de los pocos lugares donde todavía se habla arameo, el idioma de Jesús. Las iglesias ortodoxas son el producto del  conflicto religioso de 1054 que produjo la mutua excomunión entre el papa y la cristiandad de Oriente.Según un informe de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe, las cifras de violencia contra la mujer “son alarmantes”. Las mujeres de América Latina son víctimas de la violencia de género hecho que debería ser objeto de vergüenza dijo Dilma Rousseff, presidenta de Brasil. “Todas las sociedades deberían luchar por ser más justas, ciudadanas y solidarias con la mujer, añadió. El 25 de noviembre ha sido designado como Día Internacional de la Eliminación de la Violencia contra la Mujer como recordatorio del asesinato de las hermanas Mirabal por el régimen de Trujillo en 1960.Como respuesta a la crítica de que el papa Francisco no le ha dado suficiente atención a los escándalos de abusos sexuales del clero, el cardenal Sean O’Malley de Boston dijo que pronto se producirá un informe de cómo proceder en estos casos.PARA PENSAR. Existen dos maneras de ser feliz en esta vida, una es hacerse el idiota, y la otra es serlo. Sigmund Freud, neurólogo austríaco (1856-1939). Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rapidísimas, Diciembre 6 de 2013 Por Onell A. Soto, [email protected] Dec 6, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Eventscenter_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_imgAward recognises Vicar of Baghdad’s reconciliation work Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion, Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Photo: Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East[Anglican Communion News Service] The Vicar of Baghdad, Canon Andrew White, will receive this year’s annual William Wilberforce Award in recognition of his outstanding service to Christianity internationally and his service to the Middle East. The judges stated that he, like Wilberforce, had taken great risks to bring about radical change in some of the most dangerous places in the world.Canon Andrew White not only leads one of the biggest churches in Iraq with a very large clinic and school, he also heads up major reconciliation work between the various sectarian groups in Iraq not least the Shia and Sunni. In addition to his work in Iraq he has been instrumental in also bringing various groups together in Israel and Palestine over many years. He recently hosted a remarkable meeting bringing together Iraqis, Israelis and Palestinians in Cyprus.“I am more honored and inspired with this award than any other award I have every received,” Canon White said. “I, like William Wilberforce, also used to live and work in Clapham in South West London. Almost every day I would pass the Church he attended, Holy Trinity, Clapham Common, and pray Lord make me like Wilberforce.“It is humbling to receive an award which honors the memory of one of the greatest statesmen ever and has been presented to such inspirational people as Cardinal Timothy Dolan last year.”The award organizers say that White was chosen as the recipient of the award because of his “extraordinary strides in reconciliation and restoration in the face of overwhelming challenges.”They continue: “He has built a positive relationship with the government and people of Iraq on every level, from grassroots to the business community to the military. Located in the city’s Red Zone, his church serves 6,000 Iraqi citizens each week — a stunning number for a country with a 97% Muslim population.The award will be presented at a dinner attended by over 1,000 people including many of the Generals and Ambassadors who served in Iraq, as part of the annual Wilberforce Weekend, which takes place this year between May 2-4 at Chantilly, Virginia, in the United States. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL People Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Posted Apr 25, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Middle East, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

first_img Mel Schlachter says: Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT March 16, 2016 at 8:28 pm So very sad to read of Barbara’s death. As a member of the Episcopal Women’s Caucus, I am so thankful for her leadership and love of the church. Rest in God’s holy Peace, Barbara . March 1, 2016 at 4:08 pm She was a great lady. Margaret Irwin says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (10) Karen (Lisby) Leugers says: E. F. Michael Morgan says: Susan Longo Cowperthwaite says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ March 2, 2016 at 9:20 pm Barbara was an inspiration to me. I am grateful. March 6, 2016 at 6:44 am Barbara was a joy to know as colleague and friend. Her down-home hospitality was extended to all sorts and conditions of people, teaching us the love of Christ by bold and courageous example. Posted Mar 1, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 18, 2016 at 12:16 pm So many memories of very powerful years and events, Carter. Nice to hear from you.Mel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab March 2, 2016 at 3:53 pm Barbara was a supportive mentor when I was exploring the call to ordained ministry in the early 1980’s. I continue to treasure her wise counsel about juggling my relationship with God, my responsibility to my family, and my obligations to the institutional church. I still have the bean bags representing those three commitments that were part of her charge to me at my ordination. I was blessed to count her as a friend and a colleague. This obituary is published here.Barbara Jeanne Hartley Schlachter died early Wednesday morning, February 17, after a battle with ovarian cancer. She was born August 10, 1945 to Jeanne Louise Sommer Hartley and Charles Beatty Hartley and grew up on the shores of Lake Erie on her grandfather’s fruit and vegetable farm. She attended elementary school in Huron and Centerville, Ohio and graduated from Huron High School in 1963. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1967. She did her graduate work at Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary, receiving an MA in history of religions in 1970 and her M.Div. in 1972. She received the Dr. of Min. degree in Ministry and Marriage and Family in 1988 from Eastern Baptist Seminary and was certified as a pastoral counselor by the American Association of Pastoral Counselors.Visitation was held on Sunday, Feb. 21 at Trinity Episcopal Church at Gilbert and College Streets in Iowa City. The service of burial was held on Feb. 22 at 11 a.m., also at Trinity Church.Barbara was one of the first women to be ordained to the Episcopal priesthood in 1977 and helped to found the Episcopal Women’s Caucus, serving as its first president. She served parishes in White Plains NY, Staatsburg NY, Troy OH and Cedar Rapids, IA. She gave her time to the church beyond the parish, serving both at the diocesan level and national level. Among other things she served on the Church Deployment Board, was the first ordained woman to serve on the Executive Council and chaired the Committee on the Status of Women.She married the Rev. Mel Schlachter on Aug. 24, 1968, and they had two children, Erika Hartley Schlachter Sward, and Jacob Hartley Hanson Schlachter. She is survived by them and by their spouses, David Sward and Laura Hanson Schlachter, and two grandchildren, Matthew and Colin Sward, in addition to her sister, Suzanne Hartley.After she retired from parish ministry, she continued her work as a pastoral counselor and spiritual director. She also went through training as a Healing Touch practitioner and saw her ministry in her later years as one of healer. Her final passion was the environment and healing the earth, especially climate change action. She was proud of being arrested at the White House for protesting the Keystone XL pipeline, and she co-founded Iowa City Climate Advocates and 100 Grannies for a Livable Future to educate, advocate and agitate about climate change.She was a breast cancer survivor who successfully went through treatment and lived another 17 years cancer free and was diagnosed in February 2015 with ovarian cancer. She loved reading and the beauty of the out-of-doors, and most of all she loved her family and is grateful to them and to all her friends who supported her in her journey.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation in memory of Barbara Schlachter to carry on her love for children and reading at 123 S. Linn St, Iowa City IA 52240 (www.icpl.org/support/donate), or to the Barbara Schlachter Fund c/o 100 Grannies for a Livable Future at 18 Valley View Knoll, NE, Iowa City, IA 52240. Mel Schlachter says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev. Christine Payden-Travers says: Rector Knoxville, TN RIP: Barbara Schlachter, one of the first female Episcopal priests Laurie Eiserloh says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 18, 2016 at 12:13 pm Thanks John. Glad to be reminded of those exciting years and struggles. And of you.Mel March 22, 2016 at 3:53 pm Barbara was key in starting an Ecumenical Food Pantry in Hyde Park, NY. I remember well baking and preparing meals in parishioners homes – including the rectory in Staatsburg. She also was instrumental in starting a Mother’s Day Out program for a group of us with young children. Rest peacefully, Barbara. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Obituary, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York March 3, 2016 at 7:59 pm What a sister! I’ll always be grateful for Barbara’s friendship and collegiality throughout our time in seminary together, the women’s ordination struggle, the Episcopal Women’s Caucus and Episcopal Women’s History Project. I was inspired and strengthened by the amazing journey we shared on this fragile planet, our island home. Godspeed, dear friend. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET John Baldwin says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Carter Heyward says: Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 1, 2016 at 4:29 pm Also a past president of NNECA (the National Network of Episcopal Clergy Associations) and a very effective advocate of clergy health and wellness….a lovely woman in so many ways. Rector Smithfield, NC People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

first_img Doug Desper says: July 3, 2018 at 8:40 am Yes, we DO need to listen. But, there is more than listening. Here is an article from Time Magazine that you might find of interest. http://time.com/5318965/how-to-win-an-argument/?utm_source=time.com&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=the-brief&utm_content=2018070310am&xid=newsletter-brief&eminfo=%7b%22EMAIL%22%3a%22LthVMVCfZhHzr%2fKUnC0yCMPZylZOlg0e%22%2c%22BRAND%22%3a%22TD%22%2c%22CONTENT%22%3a%22Newsletter%22%2c%22UID%22%3a%22TD_TBR_59005B69-BFF8-456D-9A87-F626827A90F3%22%2c%22SUBID%22%3a%2223996706%22%2c%22JOBID%22%3a%22808327%22%2c%22NEWSLETTER%22%3a%22THE_BRIEF%22%2c%22ZIP%22%3a%22%22%2c%22COUNTRY%22%3a%22USA%22%7d July 2, 2018 at 11:58 am Lou, I wholeheartedly reject that whites are inherently racist to the exclusion of all others. Your definition of “racism = race prejudice plus power” certainly sees more than white participation. I have experiences in social work that more than confirms that every race has prejudicial tendencies and all can find power over others when necessary to manipulate and have an advantage. The Rev. Paul Walker, rector of Christ Episcopal Church in Charlottesville, Virginia, talks to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry in front of the city’s statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in September. The statue had been shrouded in a tarp while the city dealt with challenges to its decision to remove the statue of the Confederate general. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Church leaders already had begun thinking about spiritual responses to racism in 2015 when a shock of events underscored the urgency of that discernment.A young white supremacist gunman with a fondness for the Confederate flag opened fire June 17, 2015, at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine people. That massacre, along with news reports of arsons at black churches and police shootings of unarmed black men, helped fuel passage at the 78th General Convention of Resolution C019, which called on church officers to develop a churchwide response to racial injustice, and up to $2 million was approved for that work.The Charleston massacre, in particular, left bishops and deputies “feeling a sense of shock and outrage because I don’t think they thought that that could happen in 2015,” Heidi Kim, staff officer for racial reconciliation, told Episcopal News Service.Kim had been on the job about a year at that time. Since then, she has helped lead a team of Episcopal Church staff members in carrying out the mandate of Resolution C019 through a framework agreed on by church officers, including Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, who was elected in 2015 as the church’s first black leader.The racial reconciliation team developed the framework into Becoming Beloved Community, which now is the centerpiece of the Episcopal Church’s racial reconciliation efforts. How to follow through with those efforts will be the core question before the Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee when it convenes at the 79th General Convention next week in Austin, Texas.But racism and racial healing are such big topics, both socially and spiritually, that the discussion is expected to expand well beyond a single resolution, or even a single committee, to include meetings, events and exhibits in all corners of the convention center from July 5 to 13.The Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care, delivers the keynote speech Jan. 17 at the All Our Children Conference in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“The world needs us to get serious about racial healing, reconciliation and justice,” the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, the presiding bishop’s canon for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care, said in an email. “That only happens as we tell the truth about our churches and race, proclaim the dream of Beloved Community, practice Jesus’ way of love with one another and repair the breach in our society and institutions.“I’m eager to see our church sharing the wisdom and resources to support even more local adaptation and engagement with this vision.”Resolution C019 was the most prominent in a series of resolutions on racism in 2015, and it was hardly General Convention’s first time addressing racism. Resolutions dating back decades have helped guide the church as it responds to racism and atones for its own complicity in racial injustice and support for racist systems, from slavery to segregation. The mandate in 2015 sought to carry those efforts a step further.“The abomination and sin of racism continue to plague our society and our Church at great cost to human life and human dignity; we formally acknowledge our historic and contemporary participation in this evil and repent of it,” C019 reads. Another resolution, A182, called on the church to address systemic racism at all levels.Racial reconciliation also was identified by General Convention in 2015 as one of three priorities for the 2016-18 triennium, along with evangelism and care of creation. All three priorities will be highlighted in Austin in three joint sessions of the upcoming General Convention.Those sessions, named TEConversations, will feature three-member panel discussions on each topic. The TEConversation on racial reconciliation will kick off the series on July 6, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, with panelists Catherine Meeks, who heads the Diocese of Atlanta’s anti-racism commission; the Rev. Nancy Frausto, a “Dreamer” from the Diocese of Los Angeles who was brought to the United States from Mexico as a child; and Arno Michaelis, an author and former skinhead. (The evangelism discussion is July 7. Care of creation will be the topic July 10.)Meeks also is founder of the Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing in Atlanta. The center will hold a luncheon on racial healing at noon on July 6 at the Hilton Hotel across the street from the Austin Convention Center.Other exhibits on racial healing are planned for the same day in the exhibit hall, Kim said.“It’s actually kind of an exciting time,” she said. “The convention will have an opportunity to talk about what it is we’re trying to engage in.” And she expects those conversations to be lively and illuminating, as well as instructive for the coming triennium.For example, one resolution before the Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee (B004) questions whether “anti-racism” should be replaced with a term that better encompasses the spiritual transformation sought in this work. Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Rob Wright is listed as the proposer.A resolution (A042) submitted separately by the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism seeks to change the committee’s name by adding “Reconciliation.” A companion resolution (A043) would adjust the committee’s mandate accordingly.Another resolution (A138) focuses on the church’s track record of diversifying its leadership. The resolution, submitted by the Task Force on the Episcopacy and assigned to the Churchwide Leadership Committee, would give dioceses 60 days after a bishop election to submit demographic info on all nominees.“Progress towards the church’s goals and aspirations in the diversity of its leadership, including bishops, is dependent to a significant extent on gathering critical data to inform plans to achieve those goals and be faithful to those aspirations,” the Task Force said.The church’s work on Becoming Beloved Community is detailed at length in the Blue Book report generated by church officers in response to Resolution C019 from 2015. Becoming Beloved Community is broken into four parts that are illustrated as a labyrinth: telling the truth about our churches and race, proclaiming the dream of Beloved Community, practicing the way of love in the pattern of Jesus and repairing the breach in society. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Frank Harrision says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Lou Schoen says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Frank Harrision says: June 30, 2018 at 8:53 pm Except, perhaps, for our attitude towards GAFCON and the Global South, I have never thought the Episcopal Church had a big problem with racism so I don’t get what all the hoopla is about. July 4, 2018 at 1:07 pm I’d like to see evidence for a claim like that (from mainstream, non-biased sources), because I am skeptical that the Nation of Islam is all that powerful, and I’m especially skeptical that it has the support of PB Curry (unless I misunderstood your post). And the effect of their hatred is no where near as systemic as white supremacy, which is one of our nation’s original sins. Should that group gain influence in any way, though, they should be called out and condemned as a hate group (as they have been labeled by the SPLC):https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate/extremist-files/group/nation-islam June 30, 2018 at 9:11 am Racism manifests itself in so many ways. It can be blatant or subtle. If you ask thirty people to define it, you could get 20 different answers. I think it’s like Justice Potter Stewart’s description of porn. I paraphrase, I can’t describe it, but I know it when I see it.” Racism is almost impossible to prove to a person determined not to see it. There is always a reason the person that experienced racism was treated poorly that is unrelated to race. June 29, 2018 at 11:25 pm This sentence from the article sounds like racial profiling to me!!! — “The resolution, submitted by the Task Force on the Episcopacy and assigned to the Churchwide Leadership Committee, would give dioceses 60 days after a bishop election to submit demographic info on all nominees.” Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Doug Desper says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 4, 2018 at 6:36 pm And what of black teens killing elderly white women? IF we are going to be fair, let us remember stories on both sides of the fence. NOW, of these stories, so what in the following sense. From the fact that some whites, some blacks, some whatever are morally horrible, it does not follow that all blacks, whites, whatevers are. Indeed, it does not even follow that the majority are. We cannot argue from the characteristics of the few to that of the whole. To attempt to do this is simply to indulge in The Fallacy of Composition. Let us attempt to be more rational and less emotional. This will be to the betterment of ALL concerned. Larry Waters says: July 3, 2018 at 3:47 pm Much of this belief that whites are “hated” is that for most of this country’s history Caucasians have done what they like to minorities, and minorities, especially Blacks could do nothing about it. Don’t like your Black child going to a school named after someone who fought a war to enslave them? Too bad. Don’t like going to a tax payer funded govt. building with a Confederate flag flying over it? Too bad! Tired of stereotypical negative depictions on tv or in movies. Too bad.For decades, Afr-Americans just had to take it. That is changing very, very slowly and that scares people. Any complaints about the the harm done to Black people because they are black is seen as a condemnation or hatred by (some) whites. Craig Kauffman says: July 7, 2018 at 8:38 pm Lots of counting coup going on. Perhaps working on our own sanctification in “fear and trembling” ( thanks St. Paul) would be more fruitful than spending time policing others. Somewhere awhile back someone said “Let me be the change I wish to see in others.” I thought God was the source of change, not us beating other people up. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI June 30, 2018 at 12:53 am I would like to see this goeven further .perhaps encourage every parish with a Vacancy to interview at least one person of color. That why more people of color are given opportunities to grow. Director of Music Morristown, NJ June 30, 2018 at 12:42 pm The more that I read about the efforts to reconcile with others in light of racism the more that I wonder why just that single symptom of the greater sin of elitism has been identified for action. Racism is but a symptom of an elitist’s disturbed heart. Checking off the box of “Anti-Racist” leaves whole topics undisturbed that should be disturbed. Few will admit that they are a racist and the moniker of “Ally” and “Anti-Racist” are the prizes of the day. However, look at how many among us will still talk disparagingly about people in rural areas, trailer parks, the South, “flyover country”, or those with a high school education or less. Elitism is not addressed when just a single symptom of it becomes the measure. Pointing at neo-Nazis, or neo-Confederates and rushing to pray and protest in front of them solves nothing, and likely reveals something about the one doing the confronting. Rushing into the mess of someone’s racial sin to call it out is itself dangerously close to the sin of elitism. Finding the splinter in the eye of a neo-Nazi is gratifying. We found a racist! But…what about the board sticking out of our own eye? A board that bears some examining. For while the sin of racism has been found, was there not something also wrong with the pride and satisfaction to find it and call it out? That, friends, is the sin of elitism. Work for social justice. Do not get into the splinter-finding business. It will reveal ourselves. Alec Whispers says: July 4, 2018 at 10:55 am Mr. Sakal, thank you for your response. I could say Google, Huff Post, NY Times, Chicago Tribune etc. are all totally biased against conservatives. And I could also agree with Charles Vok about the systemic oppression of whites, which you say is not true. The problem is that we all have our views, which are true in our thinking. As I mentioned in a previous post, this attempt to “best” each other is NOT going to work. And there will always be evil,bigoted, mean spirited people in the world; it is sadly, a human trait. As I said in the last line of a previous post, goodwill/good intentions must come from all sides. Frank Harrision says: Frank Harrision says: Frank Harrision says: Alec Whispers says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 3, 2018 at 2:04 pm Charles, There is no “systemic oppression” or “systemic hatred” of whites in American society. Society on the whole is just coming to recognise the great imbalance of privileges and rights afforded to whites based upon the colour of their skin. As an example, look at how white gunmen are treated by the police (they tend to be taken away in handcuffs and are less often to be roughed up by the police. Compare that to how people of colour are treated by the police and you have an example (one of many)of white privilege. What do you say to that? That framework was finalized in early 2017, Kim said, and it was released to the church that May. About half of the $2 million approved for this work has been spent so far to implement Becoming Beloved Community at the diocesan and congregation levels, and implementation is expected to continue in the new triennium, Kim said.Becoming Beloved Community is referenced by the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism in its resolutions assigned to the Racial Justice and Reconciliation Committee. The stated aim of Resolution A044 is “building capacity for Becoming Beloved Community,” and it recommends a certification framework for the anti-racism training that was mandated by a 2000 resolution. The Committee on Anti-Racism also submitted a resolution to this General Convention (A045) clarifying that training requirement and reminding dioceses of it. And it is proposing a racial reconciliation awards program (A046) to recognize successful local efforts.Resolution D002 would approve $1 million to provide grants to local ministries engaged in racial reconciliation work. That kind of direct financial support is not included in the scope of the past resolutions that produced and have supported Becoming Beloved Community.Leona Volk greets Presiding Bishop Michael Curry during Curry’s September 2016 visit to South Dakota, where Episcopalians were involved in demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe importance of such efforts has been punctuated over the past three years by the continued shock of current events, from high-profile police shootings to the violent clashes last year in Charlottesville, Virginia, between white supremacist groups and counterprotesters. Kim said she also sees the need for racial healing in how Americans respond to migrants at the Mexican border. And environmental issues often are interwoven with race, as seen in the Standing Rock Sioux’s fight to preserve the tribe’s drinking water and Native Alaskan efforts to protect caribou breeding grounds in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.She also hopes Episcopalians will embrace the work of racial reconciliation as a personal spiritual journey, not as a way to shame those whom we may see as racist.“We all have our own work to do, so we can’t just externalize the problem of racism,” she said. “We all can be better at being reconcilers and healers.”Spellers said she finds hope in the visionary work of General Convention in measures such as Resolution C019 from 2015, and she expects that vision to carry the church through the next two weeks of discernment on systemic racism.“When I look to our church’s work so recently begun toward Becoming Beloved Community, and when I hear today’s fierce racial justice and healing conversations among bishops, deputies and dedicated networks — I am deeply encouraged,” Spellers said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Mark Bigley says: July 3, 2018 at 5:12 pm Mr. Ouellette and Mr. Whispers, I believe that both of you were addressing me, Larry Waters, though neither of you said so. Particularly to you Mr. Whispers, I said in my comment that people are always going to be bigoted and that there will always be evil in our world. And Mr. Ouellette, I can respond to you that all of us are beneficiaries of a society that was not only built on Black labor, but Chinese, Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian [in general]American Indian etc. The main idea in my comment was treat other people the way we would like to be treated; that idea [of course it’s Love thy neighbor etc.] would/could have avoided many of the injustices that Mr. Whispers alluded to. My take-away from both of your comments, is that discussion is pointless/hopeless. Matt Ouellette says: July 2, 2018 at 12:36 pm PLEASE do not think that this is a silly question, but specifically what is this “Jesus Movement” referred to by the PB? Do not be vague as in saying such things as “Living as Jesus lived,” or “Doing what Jesus did.” As is commonly known, these sorts of comments lead to all manner of varying interpretations. So, specifically what is the Jesus Movement envisioned by the PB? THANKS! Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 3, 2018 at 8:37 am Racism is a specific form of bigotry, one regarding racial differences. White supremacy is only one form of racism. I don’t think anyone here has suggested being white automatically means you are racist. What is often brought up is that whites are the most privileged racial group in America on a societal level, and therefore often benefit from a system that privileges them over other racial groups. For example, white Americans today are not responsible for slavery, but we are the beneficiaries of a society that was built on the backs of African slaves and should be aware of the long-lasting repercussions (social and economic) that has on the descendants of those slaves. July 5, 2018 at 6:18 am How can there be systemic oppression against the ruling class? By it’s very nature, that is an impossibility. Whites control every major institution in this country. Even when we had a bi-racial President, he was still a cog in a wheel designed by, run by, and to benefit white people.There is not a single societal indicator where whites don’t do significantly better than African-Americans. Even Affirmative Action, conceived as a way to allow non-whites more opportunity,has garnered the most benefits to white woman.I hear so many examples in which white people are told “We would have hired you, but we had to hire a black person”. (Yet, the alleged victim never sues or tells the media). Even if that were true, it’s not systemic, nor pervasive.Are there Blacks more successful than Whites in America? Yes. Some are extremely wealthy and powerful. Are there laws, policies, and traditions intertwined in the very fabric of this country to benefit minorities over whites? No. Have whites used the law, policies, and customs to give themselves an advantage over minorities, especially Black people? Yes. “There are lots of reasons that whites have so much more wealth than nonwhites. How the GI Bill played out is one of those reasons. Whites were able to use the government guaranteed housing loans that were a pillar of the bill to buy homes in the fast growing suburbs. Those homes subsequently rose greatly in value in coming decades, creating vast new household wealth for whites during the postwar era. But black veterans weren’t able to make use of the housing provisions of the GI Bill for the most part. Banks generally wouldn’t make loans for mortgages in black neighborhoods, and African-Americans were excluded from the suburbs by a combination of deed covenants and informal racism. ”http://www.demos.org/blog/11/11/13/how-gi-bill-left-out-african-americans July 5, 2018 at 6:43 pm They made it abundantly clear that their political opinions were God’s opinions and that anyone who disagreed was morally deficient and not welcome. That is bigotry. It is also probably idolatry when you decide that your political views are God’s political views. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 8, 2018 at 3:19 pm “The definition is: “racism = race prejudice plus power.” Under that definition, in American culture, all of us defined as “white” are inherently, culturally racist. ” Racism, I believe is a personal flaw. The definition noted is interesting in that it excludes the personal and very intentionally refers to “power” and that white’s are culturally racist. I submit that holding that believe is racist in itself as it paints all the individuals in the group as racist. Not having power does not exclude one from racist views. If you are human, you have the capacity for racism. If you claim you don’t because you have no “power”, you are not human. This does have a precedent in Marxist views and is a practical tool for creating class unrest. Reconciliation starts with learning to see and experience someone’s spirit, not their skin tone. Maybe a perspective of “We are souls that happen to have temporary bodies.” Expecting, and really believing that there is a whole world of racists out there is racist. See the God and expect the God in everyone. We know for sure that it is there. You know that is The Way. If someone tries to convince you that you are racist, but you just don’t know it, you are not being “woke”, you are being conned. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 3, 2018 at 7:55 am I’m interested to see how the Church handles the growing hatred of whites in our society. There needs to be a response to this. Alec Whispers says: July 3, 2018 at 8:08 am “Racism [bigotry] has NOTHING to do with power, but everything to do with how we treat each other. White people are not more or less bigoted than any other ethnicity. And to keep trying to ascribe to white people that they are the only “racists” [bigots] is the height of lies and hypocrisy.”The outcome of racism has much to do with power. Compared to white people, African-Americans have very little power. African-Americans have never banded together and passed laws disenfranchising white people. We’ve never forced an entire population of Caucasians out of a town, whites have forced Blacks out of towns numerous times.Stop and Frisk, gerrymandering, redlining, those stupid confederate statues in the public square, are all things Black people don’t like that negatively effect us that we can’t do much about because Whites have the power. Even Affirmative-Action, which was supposed to help minorities, benefits White Women the most. Jordan Sakal says: July 2, 2018 at 8:25 am I agree with your comment. My observation, however, is strictly a logical one focusing on definitions which are too broad or too narrow, Used in arguments, explanations, and the like, they often generate circularity and this is not at all helpful in seeking the truth of the matter IF we are interested in seeking the truth of the matter. Larry Waters says: Featured Events Matt Ouellette says: Matt Ouellette says: Alec Whispers says: July 2, 2018 at 8:18 am I don’t see why a racial designation would be included in the definition. Any person can be racist to another person. However, on a societal level, it’s ethnic minorities that are typically victims of racism. Charles Vok says: Featured Jobs & Calls Jordan Sakal says: July 3, 2018 at 1:02 pm I just don’t see a systemic hatred of whites that you and other conservatives claim to see. I see a criticism of white privilege in society at large, which I think should be criticized. There is a sense of rage from racial minorities against certain whites who abuse their privileges to make life harder for minorities (e.g. calling the cops on African-Americans who are selling water on the street, staying at an Airbnb, or simply mowing the lawn), but their rage is understandable given the effect that abuse has on their lives and the lives of their relatives. Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: Submit a Job Listing Doug Desper says: By David PaulsenPosted Jun 29, 2018 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 4, 2018 at 11:36 am How much or how little hatred matters, then, Matt? Please don’t be so dismissive of the hate group of Nation of Islam. It is bigger and more active than any single white supremacist group that became the magnet for Episcopal activists including a visit by the Presiding Bishop. Matt Ouellette says: Frank Harrison says: Submit an Event Listing Frank Harrison says: John Hobart says: Frank Harrision says: July 4, 2018 at 1:09 am Mr. Waters,You really wish me to do your dirty work for you by Googling various and sundry amounts of police brutality and attacks by the police on unarmed black people? I take it then that you challenge the very existence of the racial nature of these attacks? From the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/17/us/black-deaths-police.htmlFrom Miami: http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/six-miami-police-brutality-cases-besides-the-kicking-video-10322438I could keep citing and finding examples for you, but I’m sure you can Google them yourself. Here are some more articles detailing how white criminals/gunmen are treated differently compared to people of colour.https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/03/in-texas-and-maryland-white-killers-receive-more-sympathy-than-black-victims.htmlhttps://www.google.com/amp/www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-austin-bomber-racial-empathy-gap-20180323-story,amp.htmlhttps://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_59c14adbe4b0f22c4a8cf212https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_59d3da15e4b04b9f92058316/ampAs you can see there are scores news articles describing the racist way in which our media and our police services treat people of colour. There is of course no excuse for this yet it shamefully continues. Mr. Winters, my original commentary was not directed at you and I’m actually interested in why you chose to reply when my comments were directed at Charles. Charles with the one who claimed that there is systemic oppression of white people now in society when the reality couldn’t be further from the truth. I do apologise if my comments were taken in any meanness by yourself, as I mentioned, my comments were for Charles and maybe they got shuffled around on the thread here.Have a good day, Mr. Sakal Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 4, 2018 at 2:51 pm Mr. Waters, My point in providing you those linked sources was to create for you the proof that you so eagerly sought. Charles Vok was the gentleman who claimed that there was systemic oppression of whites going on. I provided evidence (biased if you would like to think it, I would like you to provide other evidence in that case.) which indicated that the treatment of people of colour (hereafter POC) by police and others (the media) is racially tinged and biased against POC. You are correct in thinking that you suffer from confirmation bias. You are choosing to disbelief what I am providing evidence for, which is of course your own perogative. (Evidence mind you, that is especially valid given there is videographic proof of these attacks and situations which occur to POC.)I am not seeking to “best” you, again my initial comments were not directed at you (rather they were directed to Charles) I seek merely to educate Charles on the fact that oppression of whites which he claims is not as valid as he thinks. July 3, 2018 at 1:24 pm Matt: we have whole marches, protests, vigils, letters, sermons, speeches, and interdenominational cooperation which frequently calls out “white supremacy” and rightly so. I have never once – ever – heard an utterance from the PB or any other official which calls out or challenges the rabid and hateful speeches Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam – an exclusively African American organization of no small size. That organization peddles racism with every word and action and has never once been mentioned for their institutional hatred of whites. Matt Ouellette says: Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Matt Ouellette says: July 4, 2018 at 11:08 am You say, “The problem is that we all have our views, which are true in our thinking.” Exactly. This is a deep seated moral relativism. What is true is what I believe to be true. But, what I believe to be true is NO evidence that it is true no matter how strongly I hold it to be true. In my beliefs I may well be wrong. (This is one reason why I NEED others to help me against myself.) Nor is something true because a good many people hold it to be true and even true over long periods of time. That is merely another form of relativism. So, a question for each of us is are we pleased with such relativism or do we want to seek the truth which is independent (as far as evidence for is concerned) of what I believe to be the truth? If we are pleased with relativism, then then only thing that each, or groups, can do is to pronounce their beliefs and shout at those who have different beliefs. If we do not want to do this but rather to seek the truth, then we have to recognize that this is hard work which we cannot do along and which must be done in the light of the laws of rational thought. Here we do have a fundamental choice to make and stick with. July 1, 2018 at 2:01 pm There has long been a basic definition of racism in very wide use in racial justice training (including the anti-racism training in TEC before the 2010 budget struggle cancelled all national ministries). The definition is: “racism = race prejudice plus power.” Under that definition, in American culture, all of us defined as “white” are inherently, culturally racist. That morally obligates every one of us to do some in-depth personal as well as cultural and institutional study and action to change our inherently corrupt, racist system. There has been significant change, sometimes, but it has tended repeatedly to be challenged by resistance and backlash. Please, TEC & 2018 GC: Keep up the good work you’ve laid out for yourselves and for all of us! July 5, 2018 at 4:13 pm Where the priests saying “conservatives are not welcome in our church?” Because that would be political bigotry. However, if the priests were merely sharing their own views on politics which certain parishioners disagreed with and decided to leave the congregation over, that’s not bigotry. That’s the parishioners not wanting to listen to contrary points of view. Larry Waters says: Alec Whispers says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC June 29, 2018 at 2:59 pm The first thing to do in such a conversation is to define “racism” so that it is not too broad, too narrow, not contradictory, not circular, etc. In many instances, the term has become a highly emotional, negative, and rhetorical word with little to no cognitive meaning. Nor will it suffice merely to attempt to give examples to try “to define” the term. Ostensive definitions are weak. One can always legitimately ask why is THIS an acceptable example of “x” and THAT is not. I seriously believe that racism is a most important issue and cannot be allowed to flounder on the level of emotions and beliefs. July 3, 2018 at 7:46 am The difficulty comes in getting people to agree to a definition. Even if you go by Webster’s definition, Dictionary.com probably has a different definition. I.E. If a white woman only dates Asian guys is she racist or is that just a preference? I say preference, others say racist. What if she won’t date white guys, but loves her father and siblings? Is that racist?I think more important than a definition is a willingness to just listen. In an issue this emotional, people tend to get defensive, often before the speaker has completed their speech. Sadly, the people most willing to discuss the issue probably aren’t the problem. Youth Minister Lorton, VA John Hobart says: July 5, 2018 at 8:49 am If you enter “bigotry” at the Google prompt, the following definition is returned: “intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.” Based on that simple definition, I would suggest that the Episcopal Church has an enormous problem with bigotry, but not necessarily with racism. July 3, 2018 at 8:26 pm The Nation of Islam has very little power or influence in society. The outlandish statements and positions of a fringe group like that is not a sign of institutional hatred of whites in greater American society. July 5, 2018 at 9:50 am I don’t think that is a very good definition of the word. Here is a better definition from Merriam-Webster of the word “bigot”: “a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices; especially : one who regards or treats the members of a group (such as a racial or ethnic group) with hatred and intolerance.” It’s not just about people who disagree with you, but includes hatred based on race and ethnicity. And I would say that, while TEC does need to do a better job at allowing for differences of opinions, it is FAR better than other denominations (e.g. Roman Catholic, Southern Baptist) of allowing its members to hold to a diverse range of opinions, within reason (you can’t disagree on gay marriage, for example, in the Roman Catholic Church or Southern Baptist churches without being excommunicated). July 4, 2018 at 7:48 am Dear Mr. Desper — YOU are in a position, through your profession to see many things. Remember, though, that humans are, by nature, social beings, We gather into groups from the moment of birth, and are formulated in those groups. It is only natural that we are “suspicious” of other groups and especially those who appear to be far removed from us in our own values. But, is this racism, elitism, bigotry, or the like? Thanks for your comments. July 5, 2018 at 12:48 pm The Roman Catholics and Southern Baptists are somewhat beyond the sphere of my influence. In my parish we have never lost a parishioner due to racial and ethnic intolerance, to the best of my knowledge, since I have been attending. We have lost quite a few due to the political bigotry of some clergy. From a church vitality standpoint, it doesn’t matter that they weren’t excommunicated. Matt Ouellette says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska General Convention 2018, Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (52) Doug Desper says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA General Convention, July 9, 2018 at 9:58 am Thank you, Mr. Hobart for these insights which are all too often forgotten. Idolatry comes in various forms and those who practice it are often the first to deny that they are doing sol John Hobart says: Frank Harrision says: July 9, 2018 at 5:53 pm I think the whole argument has been aired here in a quite intelligent way. I do think some thoughts expressed here where remembering. “Elitist,” “judgemental,” and “Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.” Elitism we can understand. What is meant by racism is nebulous at best. I live in a minority community. I am called “brother” by my neighbor and we all seem to be a contented community. I go to a church with a number of black people. Both white people and black people in my church seem to go out of their way to show kindness, thoughtfulness, and Christian love to one another. What each of us need is to “work out our own salvation with fear and trembling,” as Mark has said, we end up in the right Christian relationship to one another. Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Frank Harrision says: July 3, 2018 at 8:51 am Yes, getting people to agree on a definition can be difficult. But, suppose that we accept common standards for “acceptable definitions.” For instance, suppose I defined “university” as a place of learning? Hopefully someone would point out that this is far too broad a definition; for instance, it includes kindergarten and high school. On the other hand, one could also point out that the definition is too narrow for it excluded “online learning.” These are issues of “correct form” of a definition. After all of this is settled might we then move to the acceptability of the “material content” of the definition. Then there is another matter to be considered in doing all of this and that is the definition itself and then its application in particular circumstances. Of course, listening to the other is vital in ALL of this. One reason is that no one of us is perfect. Presume that we are seekers of truth — the success of this seeking demands the help of others, even those, perhaps especially those, who do not agree with us. Not so if we are seekers of power. But, that is another matter entirely. Thanks for your comments. Frank Harrision says: Larry Waters says: July 1, 2018 at 4:01 pm The racial justice definition you provided is valid in the aggregate, but problematic on an basis. If an Indian man tells his daughter her Black friend is not welcome in his home (but a white friend is), is he not racist? It’s somewhat rare, but sometimes a non-white is in charge. There is definitely a racial hierarchy in America and white have the numerical and financial power, but they aren’t the only group to have the sin of racism. Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Mark Bigley says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Frank Harrision says: Racial Justice & Reconciliation July 3, 2018 at 8:27 am It’s not that whites are more prejudiced than blacks individually. It’s that our society, in America, privileges the racial prejudices of whites far more than it does those of any other race. That’s why white racism is a bigger problem in America. It’s more systemic and has much deeper roots in our nation’s history (e.g. slavery, segregation, incarceration bias, stop and frisk, racial profiling, etc.). Discussing the racial prejudices of other racial groups against whites in America is less of an issue because they don’t have as much of an impact on the living standards of white Americans on a societal level. Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Alec Whispers says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Matt Ouellette says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 1, 2018 at 6:10 am Indeed, various people have various notions of what the think “racism” to mean.” This is one of the major reasons that there needs to be some definition held in common before a meaningful discussion can be had. Of course, there may be long discussions needed to come, let me say, to at least a “working” definition of racism.” Otherwise, those in that discussion are going to be talking around one another, misunderstanding one another, getting frustrated with one another, and so on. So, discussions must begin, I venture to say, with a willingness to understand whatever it is that one is discussing with someone. Certainly, willingness to understand is not the same as accepting. But, a definition and the work coming to that definition is a vital part of the discussion. Otherwise, the danger of ending in chaos looms large. July 1, 2018 at 8:03 am Perhaps because of the harm racism has done to our country and our species. How many lives have been destroyed or ended because of a person’s skin color. It’s fine to be concerned about people who live in rural areas, trailer parks, the South, “flyover country”, being talked about disparagingly, but the division and discord created by their existence is nothing compared to the hate aimed at people because of their race.Are people being denied jobs because they are from the south? Have church bodies split because someone from flyover country wanted to join the congregation? Do schools have segregated proms because the kids who don’t live in trailer parks want a separate prom from people who do? Racism and slavery nearly divided this country in half. Racism permeates every institution in this country in a negative manner. It needs to be rectified. Rector Martinsville, VA July 1, 2018 at 8:33 am It is not racist to criticize homophobia in the Global South. We should call it out regardless of where it is found, because the LGBTQ+ people in Africa will suffer the consequences of such hate. Alec Whispers says: July 2, 2018 at 8:05 am Is “racism” to be so defined as it applies only to whites? If so, then many of the “arguments” and examples using “racism” in ways “against” whites become, at best circular or “true by definition,” This may well have strong rhetorical effects, most fallacies do, but little to do with the truth of the matter if it is truth being sought. July 7, 2018 at 8:24 pm Hopefully the Gospel is preached instead of politics. They are not the same. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 2, 2018 at 3:58 pm “Racism” spoken here is really bigotry, but racism has such a catchy ring to it! If a green bell pepper is ugly to a red bell pepper because the pepper is red, then that is bigotry, what most of the commenters call racism. If the green bp thinks that he is superior to the red bp because he is green, then that is racism. Mr. Schoen’s “definition” is worded that way because he seeks a particular outcome, the same way lawyers phrase things in court to try to sway a jury. Racism [bigotry] has NOTHING to do with power, but everything to do with how we treat each other. White people are not more or less bigoted than any other ethnicity. And to keep trying to ascribe to white people that they are the only “racists” [bigots] is the height of lies and hypocrisy. People, being people, are always going to be bigoted, sadly. There will always be evil in our world, though we wish otherwise. I am sad that slavery has existed almost always. But I had nothing to do with slavery and I am not going to accept being told that I am a racist because I am Caucasian. If the EC believes that, then I will leave the EC and label them as one of the most hypocritical groups around; they would not be a religious denomination but a hate group! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Jerry Williams says: Rector Albany, NY July 9, 2018 at 8:32 pm Just what constitutes “elitism”? The word is used a good deal in a derogatory sense, but is this appropriate? For instance, IF elitism is admitting that someone is better that someone else in a given area, then what is wrong with that. MY physicians are far better than I am in the practice of medical science/art. Of course, someone may claim that she is better than someone else in a given area and yet not be. I would not call such an attitude one of elitism but rather, perhaps, snobbery. So, just what is elitism? Omar Reyes says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Alec Whispers says: Jordan Sakal says: Rector Bath, NC General Convention prepares for expansive conversations on racism, racial healing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA John Hobart says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 4, 2018 at 5:24 pm Recently a white woman yelled at some black teens visiting a neighborhood pool. She even assaulted one of the teens. When the police went to arrest her, the woman pushed one detective into the wall and bit another on the arm. Had it been one of the teens assaulting the officers I imagine the child would be beaten at best or dead. Considering an unarmed Black person a threat and ending their life for selling cigarettes while white people have assaulted cops and worse, yet are taken into custody is the epitome of racism.http://www.startribune.com/white-woman-charged-with-assaulting-black-teen-at-pool/486715771/ Alec Whispers says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 4, 2018 at 12:15 am To Jordan Sakal: Mr. or Ms. Sakal, please cite specific examples of points that you are trying to illustrate about the police. This back and forth and trying to “best” each other reminds me of the old “Hatfields/McCoy feud”, if you are familiar with that story. If we are going to try to heal the racial breech, this ” ain’t” the way to do it. Some previous commenters are understandably angry/upset over past treatment of various minorities in our country. I certainly don’t condone that treatment, I condemn that treatment and as person who is trying to be Christian, don’t understand how that treatment came to be. But blaming me for wrongs that happened in the past and that I nothing to do with, is not something that I will accept. You push me and I push back; you swing at me and I swing at you; then the situation escalates. Perhaps a better way to heal the breech is to try to treat each other justly and equitably and “love thy neighbor” etc. Goodwill/good intentions must come from all sides. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Refugees Migration & Resettlement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Immigration, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC The Rev. Paul Moore, right, who chairs the Rio Grande Diocese’s Borderland Ministries, interprets for the Rev. Hector Trejo, left, who serves three Anglican churches in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, which is across the border from El Paso, Texas. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – El Paso, Texas] Two thousand people are released weekly by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement into the hospitality of Annunciation House here in El Paso.Many of them are families who have waited their turn to cross the border and request asylum. If Annunciation House had space for 2,500, it would be 2,500, said its founder and director, Ruben Garcia.The asylees receive food, a bed, toiletries, a care package, access to a shower and help contacting relatives to arrange travel. Within 48 hours, they are placed on buses or airplanes to reunite with family members in other parts of the United States.“The vast majority of people have someone,” Garcia said.Mostly, they come from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, but some come from Nicaragua, Brazil, Cuba, Venezuela, even as far as India. Some are fleeing violence, some come for economic opportunities, others are escaping religious and other forms of persecution.Some 30 people representing large urban and suburban Episcopal congregations gathered in Southwest Texas for what they called an “El Paso Pilgrimage.” Here they gather on the Ciudad Juárez side of the border wall separating Mexico and the United States. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceOn Dec. 13, some 30 people representing large urban and suburban Episcopal congregations gathered in Southwest Texas for what they called an “El Paso Pilgrimage.” The Rev. Gary Jones, rector of St. Stephen’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, initiated the pilgrimage out of a desire to counter a narrative that vilifies asylum seekers as drug dealers and rapists, when in fact they are fleeing for their lives and their livelihoods.The pilgrimage’s first stop was Annunciation House, where participants heard a briefing from Garcia, who has worked on the border for 40 years, witnessing and responding to various migrant and refugee surges over the years.“The phenomenon of refugees is not an El Paso problem, it’s a U.S. problem,” said Garcia.“Right now, because of [U.S.] enforcement, we are seeing changes that make life miserable,” he said. “The border has become a very complicated place.”When Annunciation House began its ministry 40 years ago, it was primarily serving men who would come to the United States for seasonal work, return home to be with families and later return for work. In 1996, when the last legislative change in immigration law made it impossible to come and go, the men could no longer go home and instead stayed.“Once they make the decision to stay, they lose family,” Garcia said.Writing along the border fence outside San José Anglican Church on the Mexico side of the border reads, “We are not delinquents or illegals, we are international workers.” Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceWith the mid-1990s change in immigration law, the undocumented population rose from 6 million to 12 million by 2004, as men sought family reunification and women and children began arriving. Today, there are 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States; some have been living in hiding for 20 to 30 years, he said.Upon arrival, migrants and asylum seekers are faced with either pleading their cases to agents at designated points of entry or climbing over walls and crossing rivers to plead their case upon apprehension by agents of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, or CBP, Garcia explained.A couple of weeks ago, asylum seekers were sleeping on the bridge so as not to lose their place in line, as typically 20 people are allowed to enter at a time. Then, in an effort to clear the bridge, CBP began issuing numbers, written in magic marker on asylum seekers’ arms to keep track of their place in line, he said.From there, they are sent to shelters in Ciudad Juárez, just across the border, to wait their turn.Miguel Escobar, executive director of Episcopal Divinity School at Union Theological Seminary, greets children from the Rancho Anapra municipality outside the center of Ciudad Juárez. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Episcopal pilgrims arrived in El Paso just as news broke of the death of a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl in U.S. Border Patrol custody a day after she, her father and 161 other migrants surrendered to agents after crossing illegally into New Mexico. The circumstances of the girl’s death are still under investigation.For the pilgrims, though, it was a stark reminder of the perilous journey migrants and asylum seekers face, as well as the outdated U.S. immigration system and the Trump administration’s response to the current humanitarian crisis on the Southwestern border. The government has sent at least 8,000 troops to the border in an attempt to deter crossings. Still, migrants continue to arrive in caravans.“I wanted to see with my own eyes what’s going on,” said the Ven. Juan Sandoval, an archdeacon in the Diocese of Atlanta and a third-generation Mexican-American who grew up in Phoenix.“It just seemed instead of the military, you should be sending churches and aid workers, people who can help,” he said.The Very Rev. Nathan LeRud, dean of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Portland, Oregon, stands on the Ciudad Juárez side of the wall separating Mexico and the United States at the border in El Paso, Texas. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThat’s where the churches come in. Mostly, hospitality comes from El Paso churches, with the Roman Catholic Church and Annunciation House leading the way. Some asylum seekers receive legal assistance from organizations like the Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center, the second stop on the pilgrims’ journey.There, Christina Garcia, who provides legal consultation, explained the complexity of family reunification, which can take 20 or 30 years depending on U.S. quotas and the country of origin, and the difficulty in winning asylum cases. Her agency, she said, won six asylum cases in six years and, in a major victory, seven so far this year.The current crisis, she said, “is dehumanizing in every aspect and ignores the humanitarian right to access.” She also said El Paso, Atlanta, and the state of Arizona are the most difficult places to gain asylum, and in El Paso, as in the rest of the United States, judges make arbitrary determinations case by case.From there, the pilgrims went to St. Christopher’s Church, one of five El Paso Episcopal churches and the one closest to the border, led by the Rev. J.J. Bernal. The Rev. Paul Moore, who chairs the Rio Grande Diocese’s Borderland Ministries, gave an overview of the current situation as it relates to Central America, talking about the failure of trickle-down economics, U.S. foreign policy as it has historically related to Central America, deportation of gang members, security issues across the Northern Triangle, drug cartels, associated violence and the United States’ appetite for drugs.Across Central America’s Northern Triangle, a region that includes El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, more than 700,000 people have been displaced by violence. However, forced displacement is a global phenomenon now affecting a record 68.5 million people worldwide.The pilgrimage followed on a Border Ministries Summit organized by Moore and held here in November.On Dec. 14, the pilgrims departed for Ciudad Juárez, some crossing by car and others using pedestrian access along two of the three bridges connecting the two cities. In Juárez, the Rev. Hector Trejo, who arrived six months ago from Chihuahua, the capital of the state of Chihuahua, took them by bus to two of his three Anglican parishes.San José, or St. Joseph’s, is located along the border in Rancho Anapra, an impoverished settlement on the city’s northwest side, previously a cattle ranching area that squatters settled and that drug cartels have infiltrated.“Because the people here don’t have property rights it became a place for the criminal element,” said Trejo. “There are safe houses, and it’s a movement center for drug traffickers and people smugglers.“The challenge here is great,” he added, saying community members ask him for advice on how to get over the wall because they fear for their lives.From right, the Very Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas, dean of the Episcopal Divinity School at Union Theological Seminary, Miguel Escobar, executive director of Episcopal Divinity School, and the Rev. Winnie Varghese, director of justice and reconciliation at Trinity Church Wall Street, cross the Paso del Norte International Bridge into El Paso, Texas. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceUnlike the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Diocese of Northern Mexico doesn’t have an established ministry serving migrants; it was one thing the Episcopalians were looking to get involved in and something Trejo addressed. The reality is such, he said, that volunteers need to be trained properly to deal with people who’ve been traveling for weeks and sometimes months, people who haven’t bathed or brushed their teeth in a long time, and who have fled traumatic, violent, abusive situations and encountered the same along their journey. Still, he’s looking for partners in ministry and to build a network of responders along the border.It was something Bernal, the rector of St. Christopher’s in El Paso, echoed. The Episcopal Church, he said, needs to articulate and establish a vision for its ministry at the border.“The Episcopal Church is a voice for the voiceless,” he said. “Those of us here at the border feel isolated. We need more active voices and human resources.”Through its Borderland Ministries, the Rio Grande Diocese is looking to expand its ministry, said Moore.And that, he said, must take the form of grassroots ministry led by those on the ground through partnerships based in mutual respect, not patriarchy.On the last day of the Dec. 13-15 pilgrimage, two carloads of pilgrims departed for Tornillo, Texas, the site of a camp that opened to house 360 unaccompanied minors and now houses 2,700. They didn’t quite reach the camp, as Border Patrol agents told them it is private property, but they got as close as possible and gathered at a fence to pray for the children in custody there: for their safety, their grieved parents and their futures.“I’m really glad we went to the camp — I won’t call it a shelter, it’s not a shelter — it’s a concentration camp for children,” said the Rev. Stephen Carlsen, dean and rector of Christ Church Cathedral in Indianapolis. “I felt I needed to witness what is being done in our names as Americans.“I can’t imagine what it would be like if the U.S. border is your last hope … how people are [mis]treated and dehumanized,” Carlsen said. “If this is their last hope, what must they be fleeing?”– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL By Lynette WilsonPosted Dec 17, 2018 Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska El Paso pilgrimage shines a ‘light of truth’ on migrant humanitarian crisis at the border Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

first_img‘Home is already holy’ Drawing on faith during the pandemic as Episcopal schools close and families isolate Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events The Rev. Nate Bostian, head chaplain at TMI Episcopal in San Antonio, Texas, greets students. The school extended its spring break by a week to allow staff to prepare for distance learning as the coronavirus spreads throughout the United States. Photo courtesy of TMI Episcopal[Episcopal News Service] When COVID-19 hit Portland, Oregon, things happened “really fast,” said Mo Copeland, head of school at Oregon Episcopal School, a K-12 school of some 890 students. The high school program accounts for 320 students, 60 of whom board at the school. The school’s leaders had already been keeping tabs on school closures in Seattle, Washington, 175 miles to the north. On March 11, when Oregon’s governor, Kate Brown, banned assemblies of 250 people or more, “that shut us down immediately,” Copeland said. The school quickly assessed how best to configure online learning, and if boarders should stay on-site (they ultimately left).A little more than a week later, the Oregon school’s story is a familiar one. Episcopal schools have been no exception to this pandemic trend, said Ann Mellow, associate director of the National Association of Episcopal Schools. NAES supports and advocates for nearly 1,200 schools and programs nationwide.At this point, “I would say many, many of our schools are closed,” Mellow said. NAES member schools don’t report to the organization, so it’s unclear exactly how many Episcopal schools had closed as of mid-March. Nonetheless, “our schools have been out in front of this,” she said. “Many are already instructing online,” including Oregon Episcopal School.An invitation to familiesAs schools transition to distance learning and more people telecommute, families are living with deep-seated uncertainty and worry as they figure out how to share the same space all day together. The coronavirus pandemic is new, it’s scary, and there’s no great, granular model for how to adapt to such a constricted life.The good news is that parents already have many tools to help them, and their children, stay centered. “Faith practices, routines, [and] rituals that we engage in will provide a sense of assurance and comfort for people, reduce their anxiety,” said the Rev. Jenifer Gamber, co-author of “Common Prayer for Children and Families” and chaplain at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Day School in Washington, D.C. Gamber sees this time as “an invitation to draw near” as families.Pictured here are students at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Day School in Washington, D.C. The school is closed until April 13 at the earliest, due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The school’s remote learning plan has been put into effect. Photo courtesy of Jenifer GamberAs families do so, these 10 ideas and practices will cultivate calm and hope during uncertain times.Have caring conversations and tell storiesGamber suggests creating a family altar at home, where you can light a candle and tell family stories, read the Bible, read picture books, or look at family photos with your children. She also encourages having caring conversations, in which parents ask their kids about their feelings without judgment, and without rushing them to a resolution.“We cannot have hope without also being able to name the pain,” she said. Wendy Claire Barrie, author of “Faith at Home,” frames it this way: “We comfort them, we assure them, we’re with them. We make sure that they know that it’s okay to feel whatever they’re feeling. That goes for us, too,” she said, cautioning parents not to project their own feelings onto their children.Resources:Free online version of “Candlewalk,” a bedtime children’s compline book (available until April 15, 2020)Discounted Godly Play bundle, “Stories of God at Home” and DIY kits of the Good Shepherd and Faces of EasterPrayDuring this time without in-person church, prayer is a simple practice that everyone can try, even those “for whom prayer at home doesn’t come easily,” Barrie said. “It’s also a time to get creative with prayer.” Anything that can be done with intention, such as taking a walk, is an opportunity to pray.Miriam McKenney, development director for Forward Movement and a writer for Grow Christians, suggests that people pray spontaneously if they’re so moved. “If it feels awkward in the beginning, God is fine with that,” she said.For his part, the Rev. Nate Bostian, head chaplain at TMI Episcopal, a day and boarding school in San Antonio, Texas, recommends setting up regular times for prayer alone and as a family. The Book of Common Prayer is available, as is “Common Prayer for Children and Families.”Whatever approach feels right, “our prayer life is only going to get deeper as we continue on,” McKenney said.Resources:Free PDF of the Book of Common PrayerPrayers and Thanksgivings from Forward MovementFaith at Home“Common Prayer for Children and Families” by Jenifer Gamber and Timothy J.S. SeamansCreate written spiritual remindersMcKenney notes the power of writing things down and having them in plain sight. Recently, she wrote Psalm 31 on a 3×5 card, “just to have it on me,” and also wrote it in a note on her computer. The passage “puts me in a spirit to talk to my children more calmly,” she said. McKenney also uses the Way of Love’s seven spiritual practices daily. “It’s hard,” she said. “The point is, we keep trying.” She suggests writing one practice on your home whiteboard each day, such as “turn” or “bless,” to keep the ideas alive.Resource:The Way of LoveConnect with your teensRight now, “the hardest thing for teenagers is that they’re not allowed to be together,” notes Barrie, whose son is 17. Understanding where older kids find God and allowing them to explore those interests will provide comfort and foster connection. For Barrie, that means having her son, who finds God in music, create a playlist of songs. “And it’s not necessarily the music that I’d choose,” she said, adding that watching movies and TV shows together can bring up theological and existential questions in a more approachable way.Drawing on her work as a youth ministries coordinator as well as a parent, McKenney notes the importance of humor and a light-hearted approach when dealing with adolescents.“I just find when they feel they have permission to be themselves, they are more open to the spirit,” she said.Resource:“Faithful parenting in a pandemic” post from Wendy Claire Barrie’s “Faith at Home” blogGet outsideIf you can get outside during this time of isolation and anxiety, that’s critical. “It’s really good for our spirits to be in touch with nature,” Barrie said. Get outside at least once a day if you can, Gamber said, marvel at nature, and let your younger kids play.Limit exposure to news mediaAs much as possible, shield your children from the constant drumbeat of news via radio, television, online news sources and phone updates.Be clear about your theologyChoose stories that convey the theological messages you want your children to absorb. Listening to kids is important, “but we’re also clear about where we’re coming from theologically; that God does not cause people to get sick,” Barrie said. “That God does not pick and choose who lives and dies. That God is with us in all times, and especially in our fear and in our anxiety, God is there too.” Parents, she emphasized, are their kids’ first, and most influential, religious teachers.Resources:“Faith at Home,” book by Wendy Claire BarrieRows of Sharon, blog by Sharon Ely PearsonGrow Christians’ parenting blogStay connected to your wider communityEven schools that aren’t yet online may be in the weeks ahead. Chaplains are figuring out how best to re-create that experience virtually. Churches are streaming services, and youth groups are meeting via Zoom. Use those resources, and allow your kids to do the same. It’s important for kids to remember that they’re part of a larger community of care, Gamber said. At the same time, think about how to help people who don’t live with you. When families have victories with spiritual practices, McKenney encourages them to share those on social media.Resources:Connected in Common, home-based worship and community from the Episcopal Church of ColoradoTucked In: Bedtime Stories and Prayers with Episcopalians and Others, Facebook pageEstablish a routine and pay attentionThe rhythm of prayer and other spiritual practices can provide a foundation for a new routine. Bostian also encourages “a structure for the new normalcy,” with expected times for sleep, school and exercise. In addition to checking in emotionally, he suggests staying alert to nonverbal signs that your child or partner might be struggling, such as changes in hygiene or sleep.Remember: It won’t be perfectWhether it’s trying to pray at home, to withhold judgment, to get outside, or to create a sustaining routine, cut yourself, and those you live with, a break.“I think we are all given a lot of grace by God right now to try and to make mistakes, and to know that we can turn again and try it again. As long as we are on this path together, following Jesus, it’s hard to mess this up as far as God sees it,” said McKenney. “We can see it as a mess-up, but God doesn’t see it that way.”Barrie underscores this point, cautioning against perfectionism. She reminds parents that for children, “home is already holy.”– Heather Beasley Doyle is a freelance journalist, writer and editor based in Massachusetts. She has previously written about education and racial reconciliation for Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls By Heather Beasley DoylePosted Mar 19, 2020 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Health & Healthcare, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release COVID-19, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Theological Education Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! In the spirit of the premier of Bad Moms, the editors at Edmunds’ took a quick detour from their usual expert reviews to put together their list of best cars for “bad moms”.Inspired by Mila Kunis’ decision in the movie to trade her 2017 Chrysler Pacifica for a 1969 Dodge Challenger, the editors compiled the list below by asking real-life moms what car they’d get if they decided to just say “screw it” and be a little less perfect, rounding out the top 10 by adding a few of their own picks.Please see below for the list of top 10 cars for bad moms, and here full details behind each choice.10 Best Cars for Bad Moms2016 Jeep Wrangler – A badass car that’s poorly suited for mom duty, but perfectly suited for bad-mom duty.2016 Mercedes-Benz E63 S AMG Wagon – With 577 horsepower for optimum tire shredding, this Mercedes is more Madonna than June CleaverAny Used Honda Civic – For mom’s that want to go “Gone Girl” and disappear from the good-mom life, a Civic is a safe bet for a vanishing act2017 Porsche 718 Cayman – You’ll be forced to leave the kids (and significant other) at home when you leave for mom’s night out in this two-seater that can’t accommodate an infant seat2016 Audi R8 –  For the mom that remembers her single days when she rocked a fun car like the Audi TT and has decided it’s good to be bad again2016 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible – If your midlife crisis comes with a side of nostalgia, the 2016 Beetle takes you right back to your youth without being told when you can and cannot drop the top2016 Ford Mustang Convertible – It’s a Mustang, need we say more?2016 Mini Cooper – A popular pick among our would-be bad moms, they’re cute, fun and the two-door Cooper S has bad mom written all over it2017 Aston Martin DB11 – An unusable backseat and James Bond’s car of choice makes this a no-brainer for any mom who wants to flaunt her new bad self2016 Dodge Challenger – The color names speak for themselves, with Plum Crazy and Furious Fuscia, you can’t help but feel a little naughty driving around in this TAGSmovies Previous articleObama Administration Visits Orange CountyNext articleSullivan earns “A+” from pro-family group Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

first_img Mama Mia January 3, 2017 at 8:24 am 4 COMMENTS UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Reply Jim January 3, 2017 at 6:05 pm We used to have Ponderosa Steakhouse, Quincys, Ryans Steakhouse, Barnhill Buffet, Busy Bee Buffet, Angels, Liggetts, Village Inn, Eckerds Café inside the drug store, Buz Moes Bar B Q, several Chinese Buffets that went out, Plymouth Woodshed, Tobys in Zellwood, Pork Avenue Bar B Q, Mr. Lee’s Place, the Old Mill Buffet, Ol’ Boys Bar B Q, and that is just some of the restaurants that used to be here, there were many more….. Who knows why more don’t come, because there is plenty of business waiting for them to come to town and a lot of traffic? January 3, 2017 at 8:27 am If you don’t have tacos, or a machine that sells phone cards you’ll quickly close in Apopka. But on the up side Pine Hills is at capacity, open a Churches Chicken and rake in the money…. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSrestaurants Previous articleWhat You Need to Know About PCOSNext article10 Most Popular Home Designs in 2017 Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply center_img AnalysisBy Dale Fenwick Every time The Apopka Voice publishes an article about restaurants, we are inundated with comments.  And within those comments is one consistent complaint: Why doesn’t Apopka have more sit-down restaurants?A recent article on the website Thrillist may provide some insight.The title of the article tells us a lot, “THERE’S A MASSIVE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY BUBBLE, AND IT’S ABOUT TO BURST.”The author, Kevin Alexander, tries to explain why America’s Golden Age of Restaurants is coming to an end.  To do it he tells the story of the rise and fall of Matt Semmelhack and Mark Liberman’s AQ restaurant in San Francisco.Now Apopka is not San Francisco.  But Alexander interviewed chefs from around the country and maintains that the challenges facing restaurants are not confined to San Francisco. One chef complained about out-of-control personnel costs and the lack of skilled hospitality workers.  Another noted the problem of copycats and said, “If one guy opens a cool barbecue place and that’s successful, the next year we see five or six new cool barbecue places.”AQ opened in the fall of 2011.  From the beginning it received high praise.  In 2012 the profit was $250,000 on $2.9 Million in sales.  Sales increased in 2013 to $3.1 Million.  But profits decreased to $200,000 due to increased costs.Fast forward to 2015. Sales of $2.6 Million and profits of only $40,000.  In 2016 sales dropped to $1.6 Million and the restaurant lost $250,000.  The owners plan to close the doors later this month.So what went wrong?Did the owners lose their focus? Did the new-restaurant shine wear off? By the way, there were 3,600 restaurants in San Francisco when AQ opened and now the number is close to 7,600.Alexander contends that most sit-down dining will. “…revert back to what it was in the ’80s/’90s: reserved for special occasions,” and that more and more restaurants will become, “… hip iterations of fast-casual restaurants, with smaller menus, counter service, and a skeleton crew of front and back-of-the-house staff.”Again, Apopka is not San Francisco.  Or Atlanta.But, isn’t this what we are seeing in Apopka?  Sit-down restaurants are for special occasions and fast-casual restaurants are getting the bulk of our business?Dale Fenwick is the publisher of The Apopka Voice. Please enter your comment! Reply Reply Mama Mia January 3, 2017 at 8:18 am Things started going downhill after 9-11 and things have still not recovered completely even though there are deniers of that fact……a huge impact on the nation’s economy. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Zellwood muck farms being bought out by the state, nurseries shutting down…..it all took a toll on local business. I would love to see the economy back like it used to be when thinks were hopping! Mama Mia You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

first_img Reply And do something to stop some of the run-away development and growth that is diminishing our natural resources, and the state’s natural beauty. Reply 6 COMMENTS Mama Mia William Patrick is a Florida reporter for Watchdog.org. His work has been featured on Fox News and the Drudge Report, among other national sites, and in Florida news outlets such as the Bradenton Herald, Florida Politics, Florida Trend, Saint Peters Blog, Sayfie Review, and Sunshine State News. William is a member of the Investigative Reporters & Editors network and the Florida Press Association. February 11, 2017 at 9:51 am The best way to attract jobs and tourists to Florida is to keep our beaches clean, our oceans, our rivers, intercoastal waterways, lagoons, and underground aquifer clean, and to take on crime, and not allow drilling and fracking that would threaten Florida’s beautiful natural resources. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 By William Patrick of Watchdog.orgFlorida Capitol committee rooms aren’t often standing room only on Wednesday afternoons, much less a full month before the annual state legislative session gets fully underway.But when scores of millions of public dollars are on the chopping block, interested parties come from far and wide.Such was the case in room 212 of the Knott Building in downtown Tallahassee this week.Economic development and tourism marketing beneficiaries from across the state packed the committee room to implore lawmakers to keep the taxpayer-funding flowing – often to enthusiastic applause.More than 100 speakers were scheduled for public comment. Many others were in attendance. A few expressed support for the “corporate welfare” crackdown, but most came to oppose the bureaucratic sounding PCB CCB 17-01, a bill that would eliminate funding for Enterprise Florida and Visit Florida.Enterprise Florida is the state’s chief business recruitment organization. It uses taxpayer-funded incentives to entice private companies and nonprofits to relocate to Florida or expand within the state. Visit Florida spends tens of millions of public tax dollars annually on marketing the Sunshine State as a tourist destination.Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, wants $184 million for the quasi-state agencies in fiscal 2018.Despite reports of low return on investment, underperformance in comparison to other states and high-profile missteps such as paying rapper PitBill $1 million for a “sexy beaches” commercial, one-by-one opponents of the House bill made their case.First came the agency heads.Ken Lawson, president, and CEO of Visit Florida said he came to fight.“In the past, we dropped the ball. We failed to be transparent. We were in the newspapers,” Lawson said, vowing change.“Right behind me are my partners who stand with me,” he added. “Don’t pass this bill, because you’ll kill Florida.”Cissy Proctor, executive director of the Department of Economic Opportunity, and Chris Hart, president, and CEO of Enterprise Florida, followed with appeals for incentive funding centering on jobs and interstate competitiveness.Then, Roger Dow, president of the U.S. Travel Association, stepped forward and warned committee members against widespread economic devastation.“I can guarantee you the loss of tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars,” Dow said.“I moved here because it’s a no income tax state,” he said. “If you pass this bill, you are going to go to an income tax or increase sales taxes or cut services. That’s not acceptable.”Other petitioners recounted positive experiences.“Following Hurricane Matthew, within days the CEO of Visit Florida and the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association made it a priority to visit us,” said Amy Lukasik, director of tourism marketing for Flagler County.“They viewed our damage and had conversations on how they could help immediately overcome national attention stating our destination was closed for business,” she said.Keith Overton, president of TradeWinds Island Resorts, said that eliminating Visit Florida would eliminate the voice of independent hoteliers.“What happens when tourists get shot like the Germans?” he asked, referencing an incident from two and a half decades ago. “What happens when we have Zika Virus? What happens when we have an oil spill? Who’s there to defend us? Are we going to leave that to the national media,” asked Overton.Representatives from the Central Florida Development Council of Polk County, the Economic Development Authority for Citrus County, Pinellas County Economic Development, the North Florida Economic Development Partnership, and many other development groups made funding appeals.About an hour and a half into the two-hour meeting, chairman Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, said he had about 100 public comment cards that he still hadn’t called to speak.It didn’t matter.The panel approved the bill to eliminate funding for the two agencies on a vote of 10-5.The vote was along party lines with two exceptions. Rep. Joe Gruters, R-Sarasota, opposed the bill, saying he was open to reform but was concerned that eliminating the public-private partnerships would hurt job creation. Rep. Roy Hardemon, D-Miami, voted in favor of the measure after expressing outrage that incentive and tourism funding overlooked his low-income district, which includes Liberty City. Hardemon said his community was “deemed unmarketable.” Please enter your comment! February 11, 2017 at 4:43 pm Reply The argument that axing this program will necessitate a state income tax is ridiculous. Good try, I don’t believe that one’s argument however. Mama Mia February 11, 2017 at 9:49 am Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Mama Mia TAGSEnterprise FloridaFocus on FloridaVisit Florida Previous articleNow there’s even an app for the Federal Bureau of InvestigationNext articleGabby Giffords and Mark Kelly coming to Central Florida Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply center_img Focus on Florida:Governor Scott: “Politicians turned their back on jobs today” Personally I wish that Governor Rick Scott would get out of politics when his term as governor is over. He should just go back to being a hospital owner, oh yeah, I remember now, not so easy anymore…..!!!! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 February 11, 2017 at 10:01 am . Reply Mama Mia February 11, 2017 at 10:06 am February 11, 2017 at 9:46 am So Gov. Scott says that killing Enterprise Florida and Visit Florida is politicians turning their back on jobs today. Well there are residents all over Florida who feel like the governor has turned his back on Florida’s citizens by not expanding Medicaid to the poor, who needed it the most, especially very ill children. Money that was funded by the feds, but he said NO. The companies that he seems so interested in is gun manufacturing and bio-medical research using live animals. A lot of the other companies he attracts in from other states bring their own people with them. While I like Pitbull’s music, that is a ridiculous amount of money to spend for that. Weren’t too easy to wrangle out of them how much they spent either. Mama Mia Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Despite the passionate pleas of interested parties, lawmakers continued to question whether publicly funding a small number of private businesses was a proper function of government and if the funding could be better spent elsewhere.“The problem with economic incentives are multi-fold,” said Rep. Paul Renner, R-Jacksonville, the bill’s presenter.“It takes from the many and gives to the few,” he said. “When we spread hundreds of millions of dollars in economic development for a few companies, we steal money from core critical priorities.”If successful, the bill would divert funding for all eliminated incentive programs to the state’s general revenue fund.Rep. Jay Trumbull, R-Panama City, the committee’s vice chair, supported the measure while stressing the need to let the legislative process unfold.“Ninety-five percent of the time, a bill that gets introduced in committee is not what it looks like in the end,” Trumbull said.Rep. Mike La Rosa, R-Lake Wales, said his supporting vote was “to continue to have the conversation.”Beshears was more direct. Before calling a vote, he spoke of “spending that has run rampant,” and of “holding those with the purse strings accountable.”“In order to get where we need to go sometimes, we need to reset the budget to zero. That’s what we’re proposing,” Beshears said.The bill has several more committee stops before a full House vote. It would then meet a skeptical Senate, and wouldn’t become law without Scott’s signature, a highly unlikely prospect.After the bill passed, Scott tweeted: “Politicians in @MyFLHouse turned their back on jobs today by supporting job-killing legislation. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Ah, come on, let me tell you what I really think…..LOL Mama Mia Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply last_img read more