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first_imgMore details about the soft tissue found in a T. rex thigh bone (see 03/24/2005 story) were published in Science this week.1  Mary Schweitzer’s team claims to have found evidence of medullary bone [MB], a type of mineralized and vascularized bony tissue found only in certain birds during ovulation as a buffer against calcium loss.  The abstract and summary posted in a press release from North Carolina State says it’s a girl, and she’s pregnant:Unambiguous indicators of gender in dinosaurs are usually lost during fossilization along with other aspects of soft tissue anatomy.  We report the presence of endosteally derived bone tissues lining the interior marrow cavities of portions of Tyrannosaurus rex (MOR 1125) hindlimb elements, and hypothesize that these tissues are homologous to specialized avian tissues known as medullary bone.  Because medullary bone is unique to female birds, its discovery in extinct dinosaurs solidifies the link between dinosaurs and birds, suggests similar reproductive strategies, and provides an objective means of gender differentiation in dinosaurs.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Understated in the report is how these soft tissues could have survived for so long.  The paper in Science says only:The existence of avian-type MB in dinosaurs has been hypothesized but not identified.  In part, this could be because of taphonomic bias [i.e., fossil-hunters not expecting to find it], because the death and fossilization of an ovulating dinosaur would be comparatively rare.  Additionally, MB in extant birds is fragile, the spicules separating easily from the originating layer (fig. S1).  Dinosaur MB may separate and be lost from overlying CB in a similar manner during diagenesis [i.e., the hardening of sediment into rock].National Geographic admitted briefly that “all obvious gender indicators vanish when soft tissues decay during fossilization” but emphasized the gender-identification and phylogenetic angles of the story.  The BBC News article showed a picture of the bones, but said nothing about their assumed ages.  The NC press release did not explain the 70-million year figure, but merely asserted it.  Betsy M. Bennett, Directory of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, stated emphatically, “We’re pleased to be able to provide a way for the public to see for themselves evidence that after millions of years, soft tissue can actually be preserved in dinosaur bone.”    Another paper published in Science Express announced the sequencing of the genome from a cave bear, thought to have been extinct for 40,000 years.  In the BBC News write-up, a scientist predicted, “I don’t think we can extract DNA from dinosaurs, I think they are too old.”  It will be interesting to see if Mary Schweitzer’s team finds any in the T. rex bone, where blood vessels, and possibly blood cells, were seen.1Schweitzer et al., “Gender-Specific Reproductive Tissue in Ratites and Tyrannosaurus rex, Science, Vol 308, Issue 5727, 1456-1460, 3 June 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1112158].This is incredible.  How can these scientists ignore the obvious?  There’s no way this bone could be so old, but all they can think about are connecting homology dots between dinosaurs and birds by circumstantial evidence.  Did they see the dinosaur laying eggs?  No.  Did they prove this is medullary bone?  Perhaps.  Does it prove an ancestral relationship if the dinosaur did have medullary bone?  No.  Does that matter?  Not much.  What really matters about this story is the age of the specimen.  If this specimen is only a few thousand years old, none of this dino-bird homology matters: this blows apart the entire tale of dinosaur evolution.  Belief in millions of years and the rest of the evolutionary timeline takes a staggering blow.    Look at them strain at a gnat about medullary bone, but swallow a camel about the age.  Instead of expressing shock and anguish, instead of repenting in dust and ashes for spreading lies about dinosaur ages for the past century and a half, they grin and say, “We’ll ah’ll be.  Ain’t it amazin’ how these soft tissues survived for sempty millon yeers.”  It makes one think their brainwashing is so complete they would say the same thing if face to face with a living dinosaur.  Absurd?  Not at all: they already do it with living fossils much “older” in their time scheme.    Folks, consider the facts in this story.  Soft tissues from a bone of T. rex, everyone’s favorite monster, were found in Montana.  The specimen preserves fine microscopic detail and even pigment.  The material is still flexible and not fossilized.  We know that medullary bone in living birds is “fragile, the spicules separating easily from the originating layer.”  The initial reaction by the scientists was disbelief, because no known process could preserve soft tissues like this for so long.  (And what a thought to consider that this monster might have been alive just a few thousand years ago!)Though this is a spectacular example, we should not think that it is an isolated case.  Many insects from around the world have been found preserved in amber (fossil tree resin), with even hairs and veins in the wings preserved in exquisite detail.  Some still contain bacteria in the guts and DNA fragments have been extracted.  Often the specimens are indistinguishable from living species, yet claimed to be millions of years old.  Yet we know that tree resin weathers rapidly and is usually not produced in quantities that can extend for meters and entomb frogs and large insects, which would normally float and decay before being preserved.  On what grounds can evolutionists claim such fossils are ancient?  (For more information on fossil amber, get the presentation “Amber – New Insights” by Dr. Harald Binder, available at Access Research Network.)The only way anyone can claim these dinosaur bones are tens of millions of years old is by prior commitment to a belief system that demands forcing all evidence into a long, drawn-out process of evolution.  The young-earth creationists have a great opportunity here.  They and anyone still unbrainwashed about geologic time, and all who respect hard evidence, should hammer away relentlessly at the credulity of the Darwinists, demanding that they explain how a specimen like this could survive even one hundredth of that much time.*  If you see this bone on exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Natural History, be nice, but come prepared with good questions and reputable background information.  Don’t take bluffing and evasion for an answer.  Undoubtedly, after enough exasperation, they will probably provide the docents a manual on how to deal with those pesky visitors who won’t buy the script, but keep demanding, “Just the facts, ma’am.”**(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Anthony GrederDTN Managing EditorOMAHA (DTN) — U.S. winter wheat is starting off the 2019 growing season in the best condition in three years, according to USDA’s first weekly Crop Progress report released Monday.For the week ended March 31, 2019, winter wheat was rated 56% in good-to-excellent condition, well above 32% at the same time last year and the highest initial good-to-excellent rating in three years. Nine percent of the crop was rated poor to very poor, well below 30% last year.Top winter-wheat-producing state Kansas reported 55% of its crop in good-to-excellent condition, far better than 10% at the same time last year. More problems with the crop are being seen in Ohio and Michigan so far.For the other crops USDA included in its report this week, planting was progressing at a near- to above-average pace. Sorghum was 13% planted, compared to 8% last year and a 9% five-year average. Cotton planting was 4% complete, compared to 6% last year and a 3% average. Rice was 12% planted, compared to 15% last year and a 12% average.Oats were 25% planted as of March 31, compared to 22% last year and a 25% average. Emergence was at 25%, compared to 21% last year and a 23% average.Nationwide, soil moisture was considerably higher this year than last year at the same time. Based on reports from 48 states, topsoil moisture nationally was rated 8% very short to short compared to 24% last year and 92% adequate to surplus compared to 76% last year. Subsoil moisture was rated 8% short to very short compared to 28% last year and 92% adequate to surplus compared to 72% last year.National Crop Progress SummaryThisLastLast5-YearWeekWeekYearAvg.Cotton Planted4NA63Sorghum Planted13NA89Oats Planted25NA2225Oats Emerged25NA2123Rice Planted12NA1512Rice Emerged2NA53**National Crop Condition Summary(VP=Very Poor; P=Poor; F=Fair; G=Good; E=Excellent)This WeekLast WeekLast YearVPPFGEVPPFGEVPPFGEWinter Wheat27354511NANANANANA111938284Anthony Greder can be reached at anthony.greder@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @AGrederDTN(AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_imgHere’s a true story: One non-hustler says to another non-hustler, “How’s it going?” The second non-hustler says, “I am on the right side of the dirt.” The first non-hustler says, “Well, that’s as good as it gets.”No. That is not “as good as it gets.” “It” gets way better than just being on “the other side of the dirt.”What You Tell YourselfNon-hustler’s make very poor language choices. Those choices provide a clear view into their mindset, and the language they use puts them in a disempowered state. Words like, “I am on the right side of the dirt,” or “Any day above ground is a good day.” That’s not setting the bar very high, is it?If you ask a non-hustler how they are, they’ll say, “I’m okay.” Why on Earth would you want to be “Okay.” They’ll tell you that they “hate Mondays,” “can’t wait for Fridays,” that Wednesday is “hump day,” and that you shouldn’t “work too hard.” Who wants to be “okay?” That sounds like mediocrity, doesn’t it?They’ll also tell you they are “living the dream,” but said in such a way to make sure you know that they aren’t deeply engaged with what they’re doing and that they are cynical. This is how non-hustlers identify each other.Empowering Words, Empowered MindsetHustlers are different. If you ask them how they are, they will say something like,“Excellent,” or “Wonderful.” They tell you that they are “killing it,” or that they are “crushing it.” This is a very different mindset than that of the non-hustler, and so it comes with very different language choices.The hustler doesn’t notice anything different about Mondays and Fridays. On both days, they’re engaged with their work and their life. Because they are engaged in their lives, they don’t see Wednesday as being significant because it is half way to the weekend; they like all the days.You’ll never hear a hustler say, “Don’t work too hard,” or that they are “just happy to be on the right side of the dirt.”Your brain is designed to keep you alive. That is its primary function. But that doesn’t mean that your goal should be simply survival. You are capable of way more.You are here to do something meaningful, to passionately engage with life, and to thrive.last_img read more

first_imgPrime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday inaugurated the country’s longest road tunnel that links Kashmir Valley with Jammu by an all-weather route and reduces the distance by 30 km.The 9-km long ‘Chenani-Nashri Tunnel,’ built at the cost of ₹2,500 crore, was dedicated to the nation by the Prime Minister in Chenani in the presence of Jammu and Kashmir Governor N.N. Vohra and Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti.”Kashmiri youths have two options: tourism and terrorism. For 40 years terrorism gave you nothing but bloodshed, deaths and destruction. Had you chosen tourism, the benefits today would have been phenomenal,” said Mr. Modi after the inauguration.”Want to tell the Kashmiri youth what actually is the power of stones. On one side, youth in Kashmir throwing stone. On other side, people giving their blood and sweat, cutting rocks for Kashmir’s development,” he added.After the inauguration, Mr. Modi, along with Mr. Vohra and Ms. Mehbooba, travelled in an open jeep through the tunnel for some distance.The Prime Minister, the Governor and the Chief Minister then posed for a photograph with the engineers who were involved in construction of the tunnel. A screen grab of the newly inaugurated Chenani-Nashri tunnel, in Jammu and Kashmir on Sunday. Courtesy: Narendra Modi – YouTube  “Tunnel to bring Kashmir closer to the country”J&K Chief Minister Minister Mehbooba Mufti welcomed Mr. Modi and said the tunnel would bring Kashmir closer to the country. “The tunnel will not just reduce the physical distance but bring Kashmir closer to the country. The inauguration of tunnels will also help (sic) to join the hearts of the people,” she said.She thanked Mr. Modi for his support during the unrest in the State in 2016. “The situation has improved now but lot needs to be done. We have won all wars but our real strength is democracy. We have to help to bring the people out of trouble through agenda of alliance,” she added.”The J&K tour operators have a message for you: Kashmir is a safe place for tourists,” she further said.Tunnel to reduce travel timeThe tunnel, bypassing snow-bound upper reaches, will reduce the journey time by two hours and provide a safe, all-weather route to commuters travelling from Jammu and Udhampur to Ramban, Banihal and Srinagar.The estimated value of daily fuel savings will be to the tune of ₹27 lakh, according to the PMO.The tunnel is equipped with world-class security systems, and is expected to boost tourism and economic activities in the State of Jammu and Kashmir.The Chenani-Nashri Tunnel is a single-tube bi-directional tunnel with a 9.35-metre carriageway and a vertical clearance of 5 metres.There is also a parallel escape tunnel, with ‘Cross Passages’ connecting to the main tunnel at intervals of 300 metres.It also has smart features such as an integrated traffic control system; surveillance, ventilation and broadcast systems; fire fighting system; and SOS call-boxes at every 150 metres.last_img read more

first_imgThe political slugfest over the bandh called by Bharatiya Janata Party in West Bengal continued for the second consecutive day on Thursday, with the Trinamool Congress leadership alleging that a shop owner at Keshiary, Paschim Medinipur was killed during the bandh.TMC leaders including Subrata Bakshi and Manash Ranjan Bhunia visited the area and met the family members of the deceased. “Shame on you BJP. Innocent people are getting killed. Surely the state government will stand by the family in this hour of grief,” a TMC statement said.The BJP, however, denied involvement in the violence. Its senior leader Kailash Vijayvargiya said the TMC was trying to defame his party by levelling such allegations.last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA — Paul Dewar, a teacher and union leader from Ottawa who became the New Democratic Party’s foreign-affairs critic, died Wednesday after contending with brain cancer for a year.Despite struggling with dyslexia as a child, getting trounced by Ed Broadbent during his initial foray into politics, losing his seat in the House of Commons in the Liberal wave of 2015 and being diagnosed with a terminal illness, the 56-year-old was infused with a positive, hopeful attitude and belief that the world could be made a better place.So it was startling when Dewar revealed in June 2018 that as he was recovering from brain surgery several months before, he saw news of the high-school shooting in Parkland, Fla., that killed 17 people — and that he “abandoned any hope” and was ready to give up.Except giving up was never really in Dewar’s vocabulary. Inspired as Parkland students channelled their loss and pain into a rallying cry against gun violence in the U.S., Dewar decided to use what time he had left in life to launch a new initiative, Youth Action Now, and empower a new generation of leaders who will work for the greater good.Dewar is survived by his wife Julia Sneyd and their two sons, Nathaniel and Jordan.He is perhaps best known for having served as the MP for Ottawa Centre from 2006 to 2015, much of which he also spent as the NDP’s foreign-affairs critic, following an early career as an elementary-school teacher and union executive.Whether it was the war in Afghanistan, free-trade deals or the defence of human rights and democracy in developing countries, Dewar was fierce in his convictions but also willing to listen to differing viewpoints to try to find a consensus.That combination of principle and pragmatism, combined with the aforementioned optimism, earned Dewar respect on both the government and opposition benches, and helped the NDP shed some of its image of being idealistic and naive on Canada’s dealings with the rest of the world.Dewar’s path into politics meant following in some pretty big footsteps. His mother, Marion Dewar, was not only one of Ottawa’s most beloved mayors but also a heavyweight in the federal NDP and social-activist circles in the 1970s and ’80s.Dewar would often say that he learned about politics from his mother, telling the Ottawa Citizen in September 2011 that while Marion warned against running for office just to get power, “power isn’t a bad thing, it’s how people use it.”Then there was Ed Broadbent, the legendary former NDP leader whose short-lived political comeback started by trouncing Dewar during the latter’s first nomination battle in 2004. Dewar had been campaigning for the nomination when Broadbent decided he wanted back in.It was only after Broadbent’s difficult decision two years later to leave politics once again to care for his sick wife that Dewar was elected to replace the former leader as the MP for Ottawa Centre.Yet it didn’t take long for Dewar to come into his own and make his mark with a respectful and pragmatic approach to politics — and his determination to fight injustice and cynicism at home and abroad.Many might not realize that Dewar was dyslexic. Dewar credited the disability, which makes it harder to read, write and sometimes speak, with having made him more resilient as well as a better teacher and politician.“I certainly identify strongly with people who are needing help in taking on things, be it with learning challenges, life challenges in general,” he told The Canadian Press in November 2011. “It’s about empathizing and understanding.”He faced other challenges as well: Dewar placed a distant fifth when he ran to replace Jack Layton as NDP leader in 2012. Many were shocked when Liberal Catherine McKenna defeated him in 2015. He was one of several apparently popular New Democrats swept out of urban ridings that year.The party kept him on as an adviser, helping the handful of new MPs the party elected adjust to their new duties. Afterward, he joined the board of Human Rights Watch and contemplated running for mayor of Ottawa.Then came the diagnosis in February 2018 that he had Grade 4 glioblastoma, the same type of brain cancer that killed Tragically Hip singer Gord Downie. Dewar had gone to the hospital when he felt numbness in his arm that didn’t go away — a bother he’d at first put down to being tired from a 36-kilometre skate on the frozen Rideau Canal. That’s five full lengths of the skateway that runs not far from his downtown Ottawa home.He soon had surgery to remove a tumour on his brain but the cancer couldn’t be cured, only held at bay for a while.Yet even then, his optimism continued to shine. If people wanted to do something for him, he said, they should contribute to their neighbourhoods. Smile, laugh, give. “Knock on your neighbour’s door and say hi.”“What I have discerned is that notwithstanding the urgency to live as much life as possible, I see this path I am walking as a gift to realize the beauty of life itself,” Dewar wrote in an open letter announcing his plan to launch Youth Action Now a few months later.“Each one of us is capable of contributing something to make a difference with our family, friends and in our community. Sometimes cynicism, isolation and fear hold us back from truly contributing and participating in making the world around us a better place.”— Follow @leeberthiaume on Twitter.Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Presslast_img read more