不准不开心

first_imgMourinho: Man Utd players physically fragileby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Jose Mourinho says his players couldn’t physically cope with Liverpool on Sunday.Mourinho admits Liverpool were physically superior on the day.”We have lots of problems related to physicality,” said Mourinho.“We have lots of players that I could consider injury problems, because some of our players are always injured and it’s not with me – it was before me.“If you look to the stats with Mr Van Gaal and David, we had players that are permanently injured and, when you’re permanently injured, physicality is difficult to get.”Then there are qualities you cannot improve or make them have. Robertson, Mane, Salah, Wijnaldum, Keita, Fabinho, they are physical players and on top of that they are good technically.“I have lots of good players technically, but we don’t have that intensity or physicality.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgTottenham boss Pochettino expects a hammering from Cardiffby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino has warned his players to expect a battering against Cardiff City.Pochettino admits his men now need to brace themselves for a bruising ­encounter in South Wales.“It’s a tough place to play,” said the Argentinean. “It’s going to be difficult.“Cardiff’s physicality makes them a very dangerous team and a very ­difficult one to play against. They have some talented players, too.“Cardiff won against Leicester [on Saturday] — after Leicester had two amazing victories against Chelsea and Manchester City. They lost, at home, to Cardiff. And Cardiff are going to have all the confidence. It’s going to be a tough game.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgJoe Lunardi's hair looks suspect.Twitter/@RPreslanEvery year, ESPN college basketball analyst Joe Lunardi is tasked with putting together what he thinks will be the exact bracket that the NCAA selection committee will release on Selection Sunday. And given the Worldwide Leader’s influence, many fans take what he produces as fact. Sometimes it slips your mind that what he says isn’t actually official.To his credit, Lunardi has nailed all 68 (or 64, previously) teams a number of times. So how did he do in 2015? Well, Lunardi actually missed two teams this year. He had both Temple and Colorado State in the field, and omitted Indiana and UCLA. Of course, the Hoosiers and the Bruins were by far the most controversial inclusions this year.Lunardi got all four 1-seeds correct, and all four 2-seeds. He had Baylor as a 4-seed, with Maryland as a 3-seed, which in the real bracket, was reversed. Overall though, he did an incredible job. Almost every team in his field was within one seed line of where it actually wound up. Here’s his bracket. You can see the real NCAA Tournament bracket here. So yes, Joe Lunardi, is still good at his job. Now we just have to figure out what’s going on with his hair.last_img read more

first_imgTaylor Swift visited sick kids at Brisbane’s Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital yesterday.Taylor Swift Visits Patients At Lady Cilento Children’s HospitalCredit/Copyright: FacebookTaylor, who has been spending time on the Gold Coast as boyfriend Tom Hiddleston works on his film Thor: Ragnarok, visited patients and staff at the hospital, which provides family-centred health care for every child and young person in Queensland.Find out more about the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital here.last_img read more

first_imgTORONTO – A global payment company will give members of Canada’s largest small- and medium-business association lower rates on American Express transactions.Chase Merchant Services will charge a new lower rate to Canadian Federation of Independent Business members that process less than $500,000 in Amex transactions.CFIB says the deal aims to make it easier for small businesses to accept Chase payment cards.CFIB president Dan Kelly says the partnership means many of the federation’s members could see significant savings thanks to the offer, with some members potentially seeing fees reduced by almost 50 per cent.Retailers pay fees each time consumers use a credit card. The fees differ based on type of credit card, business and other considerations.The retail industry has been advocating for lower fees, arguing that Canadian businesses pay some of the highest fees worldwide.CFIB’s 110,000 members collectively process more than $12 billion in electronic payments through Chase every year.last_img read more

first_imgOTTAWA – When G7 finance and international development ministers convene in British Columbia next week, Canada hopes the meetings will generate fresh ideas on how aid money can be leveraged to entice the private sector to boost investments in poorer parts of the world.The challenging search for solutions will take place in Whistler, where finance and international development ministers will gather together for the first time at formal G7 meetings.Many countries, including G7 members like the United States and the United Kingdom, have been working for some time to lure more private capital into developing nations as a way to help make up for inadequate levels of foreign aid.Canada has been a late bloomer in this area. Earlier this year, it became the last G7 country to create a development finance institution to operate alongside its government-run foreign aid program.Marie-Claude Bibeau, the federal international development minister, says the hunt for new ways to get more private investment cash into developing countries will be a key part of the talks in Whistler.As this year’s G7 host, Bibeau says Canada will also put female empowerment at the centre of the development discussions — with new approaches that will take into consideration the full life cycle of girls, adolescents and women.Whatever Canada announces on development, she added, will be in line with the Trudeau government’s feminist policy.But Bibeau stressed that without innovative ideas, the international community will fall well short of its overall targets on eradicating poverty.Investments from donor countries around the world will have to be between $5 and $7 trillion in order to achieve the planet’s sustainable development goals by 2030, she said.Total funding last year was around $147 billion, she added.“We have to go from billions to trillions, so we know that if we only count on those donor countries, such as Canada and the G7 countries, we will never end poverty,” Bibeau told The Canadian Press in an interview.“So, we really have to think differently and bring new partners on board.”Bibeau said many options will be on the table in Whistler. She declined to get into specifics, but added that solutions could involve new ways of removing financial hazards for the private sector in riskier parts of the world.Canada sees the G7 as an important setting to come up with new ideas because of the large role it plays in development.Bibeau’s office says the G7, including the EU, provides 76 per cent of the world’s “official development assistance,” which is defined as government aid intended to improve economic and social development in poor countries. The G7 also provides 81 per cent of the planet’s humanitarian assistance, a spokeswoman for Bibeau said.The G7 discussions will also focus on trying to get the private sector interested in investing in women’s businesses in developing countries — and Bibeau said there will be an emphasis on adolescent girls.Adolescent girls in poorer countries often face big obstacles related to gender-based violence, early pregnancies and other challenges that result in them leaving school early age, she said.For Bibeau, giving adolescent girls in these countries the chance to improve their education, health and nutrition will be a big part of the effort.“We believe that this is the best way to end poverty — but if we want to have empowered women, we have to give girls the opportunity to develop their full potential,” said Bibeau, who has invited girls from developing countries and Canadian indigenous communities to address the ministers directly.However, some argue it won’t be easy to convince companies to put more of their money into developing countries.Liam Swiss, a development expert at Memorial University in St. John’s, N.L., said it’s important and admirable for governments to encourage private sector investors to get involved.But companies’ main goals will remain focused on where they can make money, he said.“They’re profit driven, so you can have good corporate social responsibility, but at the end of the day, the things that matter most is what their shareholders can yield in profits,” said Swiss, who is unsure what new tools could be proposed to attract private investors.“In terms of new and innovative ways to bring that about, I’m a bit at a loss in terms of what the G7 could offer to firms to encourage their partnership and their investments in these ways that hasn’t been tried before.”Critics of this approach, Swiss added, warn about potential abuses by private-sector firms in communities and of individuals — and the possibility the poorest people won’t see economic benefits.Others are more optimistic about what the G7 meetings might come up with.Megan O’Donnell of the One Campaign, an anti-poverty group co-founded by U2 singer Bono, said efforts by come countries have been “extraordinarily successful” so far in attracting private investment dollars to developing countries.The key question, she said, is whether we know that there have been positive impacts for the poorest people.“There has been some interesting work to suggest that that is the case, but I think a lot more can certainly be done to continue to build that evidence,” said O’Donnell, the One Campaign’s policy manager on gender issues.Looking ahead, she believes giving more economic empowerment to women — as entrepreneurs, for example — will be a win-win because they can also help investors’ bottom lines, once the financial risks have been eliminated.“It might not be intuitive for them at the start to recognize, ‘Hey, this is really a profit-seeking opportunity for us,’” she said of companies.“But with removing some of those risks, then all of a sudden the private sector is increasingly incentivized.”last_img read more

first_imgThe Canadian Press HALIFAX — DHX Media Ltd. reported a loss in its latest quarter compared with a profit a year ago as its revenue rose 5.5 per cent.The children’s entertainment company says it lost $2.4 million compared with a profit of $8.1 million a year ago, due to a larger non-controlling interest in Peanuts and a non-cash write-down in deferred financing charges.The loss amounted to two cents per share for the quarter ended Sept. 30 compared with a profit of six cents per share a year ago.Revenue in what was the first quarter of DHX’s financial year totalled $104 million, up from $98.6 million.Last week, DHX announced a deal to sell its Halifax animation studio to IoM Media Ventures as part of what it said was a strategic shift to focus and streamline its production operations.DHX completed a strategic review earlier this year that ended with a deal to boost distribution and sales of its Peanuts brand in China and elsewhere in Asia. The company also suspended its dividend, cut staff and streamlined operations. Companies in this story: (TSX:DHX)last_img read more

first_imgRecent news about an increase in Indian corporates and state entities issuing dollar bonds is welcome news, especially since it clearly shows investor appetite for lending to credible Indian business models. However, relatively easy liquidity and high investor appetite for lending in the international markets must be tempered by the fact that borrowing in foreign currencies is beneficial for businesses with certain specific balance sheet structures. Also Read – A special kind of bondWhile relatively low interest rates abroad and increasing investor demand for relatively good quality debt assists in borrowing for Indian businesses, it is essential to realise that severe foreign exchange rate fluctuations can severely impact the debt servicing capacity of a company that relies excessively on foreign borrowings. For businesses that have assets creating dollar cash flows, borrowing in the currency makes sense. For instance, for an exporter of products or services to the United States with a dollar-based stream of income, financing greenback liabilities is more feasible. While macro factors are beyond the control of a business, understanding and creating a well-balanced balance sheet is something that deserves attention. Not only is it essential for a balance between assets that can generate cash flows to match liability outflows, in the case of multiple currencies, it is vital that currency mismatches are avoided as far as possible. Also Read – Insider threat managementFor businesses looking to take on foreign currency denominated debt, it is essential that there is a long-term focus on how foreign exchange volatility will be dealt with. For firms that do not have dollar-based assets that generate foreign currency denominated cash flows, prudence is advised on foreign currency borrowings. While the appreciation of the Indian rupee can lead to windfall gains by way of lower interest and principal payments, a severe depreciation of the currency, a factor beyond the control of a business can leave the company in a precarious position with debt servicing. Most importantly, the company might be in the sectors of financial services, energy or IT services, and therefore being exposed to the macro-vagaries of the foreign exchange market for business success is not an ideal situation to be in. The experiences of European and Japanese financial institutions during the 2008 financial crisis are a good reminder of the perils of creating excessive dollar-denominated liabilities while owning assets primarily in domestic currencies. Balance sheet imbalances and a shortage of dollar funding precipitated a crisis that severely damaged the financial systems and institutions in Europe and Japan. One major takeaway from the 2008 crisis was that creating an imbalanced balance sheet renders the business exposed to risks, managing which is inherently not the core objective of the company. For instance, an energy developer facing severe pressure to fund dollar liabilities isn’t ideal. The funding pressure may lead to a situation in which despite having a robust energy business, the energy developer might be severely loss-making due to a significant change in the cost of foreign liabilities that need to be paid off. The decision of how much of liabilities must be in a foreign currency is no less important than the choice of how much debt a business must utilise. While the decision around leverage is driven by the quality of cash flows that a company has to finance the future liability payments, i.e. interest payments, the decision around the currency to be utilised must also be factored in separately. Effectively, the risk a business undertakes in using foreign currency debt must factor in the volatility in the currency pair that is applicable in terms of the cash flows and liability payments. For instance, if a business receives all incoming cash flows in Indian rupees, then the amount of dollar-denominated debt ideal for the company needs to be carefully evaluated. In a world with relatively low yields, especially in the developed economies, and a growing economy such as India, the interest to lend to Indian businesses by global investors is inevitable. For any business, the focus must be on creating a long-term track record of utilising foreign currency denominated debt effectively to either take advantage of relatively low-interest rates or potentially finance international growth. However, prudent usage of foreign debt by Indian business is also vital to ensure that investor confidence builds up for both individual companies and Indian firms in general. Judicious usage of foreign currency debt is critical for the long-term goal of increased access to global capital markets for Indian companies. As with financial structures and balance sheet decisions, there is no one-size-fits-all solution for foreign currency borrowings. A sustainable long-term focused borrowing strategy will be the key differentiator for successful businesses.(The author heads Development Tracks, an infrastructure advisory firm. Views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Bolt is not ready for the highest level

first_imgUsain Bolt was a part of the Borussia Dortmund squad in the last training session and he seems to be serious about becoming a professional footballer as the next step of his life.The Borussia Dortmund head coach, Peter Stoger, seems to have a different opinion as he believes that Bolt is not good enough to play at the top level – he claimed that the former sprinter is talented but simply has to be better.The former Köln coach spoke about Bolt’s trials as he said, according to Give Me Sport:“It’s all about procedure and movement, but the most important thing is that he had fun.”borussia dortmund, marco reus, jadon sancho, paco alcacerReport: Dortmund hammer four past Leverkusen George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund put four past Bayer Leverkusen.Borussia Dortmund leapfrogged Bayern Munich to claim second place in the Bundesliga. After handing out a 4-0 thrashing of…“I think he is talented, but when he wants to play at a higher level, he clearly has a lot of work to do.”“The physique he needs for his other sport is completely different from what he needs for football, but it was really fun for us.”“It was a pleasure for us to meet a guy like him and to work with him.”last_img read more

first_imgThe Argentinean superstar knows clubs from other countries are breaking into the football elite thanks to foreign investmentA not-so-long time ago, there were just one or two powerful teams in any of the Top 5 European leagues.And Barcelona and Real Madrid were two of them.But now, teams from countries like England, Italy, and France are starting to catch up to the Spanish La Liga giants.At least this is what Barca’s Lionel Messi believes has happened in the last years.“There are clubs now with a lot of money and players move for that reason,” he told ESPN.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“Whenever the most money is, that’s where they end up going. Things have changed and now the owners of clubs are multi-millionaires.”“Before everyone wanted to play for Barca or Madrid, who were the best, but now everything’s tighter and there’s not much of a difference between the teams in Manchester, PSG, Madrid, us, Bayern [Munich], the Italians…”And because of this, he was asked about if he would ever leave Barcelona.“I am just thinking about the years that I can keep playing,” he said when asked about what plans he has for retirement,” he explained.“When the moment comes, I will decide. I want to finish the contract I have and then we will see if I continue or not. It doesn’t worry me right now. [But] the club can be calm [when I am gone] if they keep bringing players through the academy and making good signings.”last_img read more