上海青韵

first_imgClaire Monge broke the game open with a 2RBI double in the third inning and for the first time since 2012 the No. 6 seeded Arcata High softball team won a playoff game, knocking off No. 11 Berean Christian (3-17) 9-4 in the opening round of the NCS D-IV tournament, Friday evening at Arcata High.Monge’s hit put Arcata ahead 6-3, a lead which would only grow until the final pitch was thrown.Fifteen minutes into Friday’s game, however, and things didn’t look so well for the Tigers.Berean …last_img read more

first_imgChandra Wickramasinghe and colleagues at Cardiff University have raised the bar on tale-telling ability.  They believe that comets splatting on earth can carry away germs of life that gradually spread farther and farther out, eventually escaping the sun’s pull.  Over time, they might spread life to other worlds.  They estimate that since the origin of the Milky Way galaxy, over 10 billion worlds could have been seeded with life by this process.  Story in EurekAlert.Wickramasinghe, former colleague of the late Fred Hoyle (see 08/22/01), is a useful idiot-genius who has helped demolish arguments for a chance origin of life, but replaced it by a tall tale even more incredible.  Since storytelling has become part and parcel of science, anything goes if you have a PhD, the whoppier the better, and the science news outlets will publish it with nary a guffaw.  (Unless you are a creationist.)(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgSouth African students writing thenational matric exams in 2010 managedto score a 67.8% pass rate – a 7.2%improvement on the previous year’s result. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) Shouts of joy echoed through many of South Africa’s poorer communities on the morning of 6 January 2011 as the previous year’s national matric results were released. Several matriculants in these areas – with little or no family income, scant classroom resources and lack of transport – managed to rise above the odds and pass the exams convincingly, significantly boosting the profiles of the schools they attended.Countrywide, there have been pass rate increases of between 10% and 50%, making matriculants’ families, schools and communities extremely proud.Eddie Sebaya, principal at Raphela Secondary School in Johannesburg’s Orange Farm township, was chuffed after receiving his school’s results. “It’s really a dream come true for us to achieve these results. From the first term of the year we started working to ensure we improved our pass rate,” he said.Despite Orange Farm being hit hard by poverty and HIV/Aids, the school managed to up its pass rate from 45% in 2009 to 89% in 2010.Education the key to a better life“Education is the only way we can fight poverty and improve lives in our community,” said Raphela school matriculant Noluthando Khumalo.“With a good matric pass, we can study further or get a good job and improve our families, and then our community. It was not easy, but we did it. We hope our results inspire those who follow us to do even better.”Sebaya said his pupils had overcome many obstacles to achieve such good academic results. “This is a very poor community and our school has very few resources to work with.”Key to the school’s success was making a few changes to help pupils study and grasp the subject matter.“We asked the students to start coming to school earlier in the first term. This was to give them a chance to read and go through their work before classes started. They would then ask questions on anything they did not understand before starting on the new work of that day. The students committed to this and it clearly proved successful,” Sebaya said.But this is only the beginning, the principal added. “The real hard work starts now, we have to maintain this kind of result, we cannot drop below 90% now. The community will expect us to keep up this kind of result and increase from here.”Parent involvement vitalLethukuthula Secondary School in Katlehong, east of Johannesburg, grew its pass rate from 61% in 2009 to 97% in 2010. “Im really proud of the students’ achievement this year,” said principal Doctor Ngobese.“We were determined from the beginning of the year to achieve this kind of pass rate. With the help of our governing body, who are the parents of the students, we realised our goal.”Langeberg High School in Robertson – a farming area in the Western Cape – increased its pass rate by 35%, achieving an 87% average in 2010. Principal Dr Adriaan Landman said hard work helped bring about the good results.“The learners worked hard throughout the year. They were very motivated. Parent involvement played an important role in ensuring the learners did well,” he said.‘Worth every step’Thandi Hlogwane from Lugaju High School in Impendle, rural KwaZulu-Natal, said she had to walk vast distances to get to school, but it was worth every step. “I walked very far every day to get to school. There are no high schools near my house, so I had to walk for about two hours to get to school. I would leave home early to ensure I was at school by at least 6am, so I could start studying and going over my school work.”Hlogwane got a distinction in mathematics and physics, and hopes to study medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal this year.“Waking up early every morning and studying over the weekends while my peers hung out was all worth it. My dream is to be a doctor and I’ve achieved the academic results to realise that dream. Now my next step is to secure a bursary.”last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseFirst, let me say that this blog is 100% guaranteed to NOT help commodity prices or the overall farm economy. It also should be noted that I am NOT a: preacher, doctor, researcher, PhD, or anything other than your friendly farm writer.With these important disclaimers out of the way, please read on. As I continue to hear about more farms being sold, mounting economic stress for farms and very bad things occasionally happening within the agricultural community when things go wrong, I feel compelled to share some thoughts on how to handle the inevitable challenges of life, including these tough agricultural times.First, when tough times come about on the farm, it is important to understand that the only thing you can actually control is what you do. You can influence/manipulate/orchestrate many things, but you can only truly control your actions.So what shapes your actions? I believe that everything we do is driven by our guiding set of principles or priorities. Tough times offer great opportunities assess the personal priority list guiding your actions and decisions. If you haven’t done this, there is no time like the present. Start at the top with the most important thing, then work your way down the list. Note that each item on the list has influence over every item below it on the list. Also, be sure to include “self” on the list (I promise you that it will be on there somewhere even if you don’t include it).Now, here is the interesting part. Review some recent decisions you have made (both important and mundane) and compare them to the priority list you crafted. If a decision you made for one item on the list hurts or detracts from an item above it on the list of ideal priorities, you need to move that item below the item that drove the decision. For example, if you list “family” as your No. 3 priority, but miss an important family event to work on the “farm” that is your No. 4 priority, the “farm” is a least a No. 3 priority for that particular decision and “family” is at best a No. 4. If you have a pattern of behavior that regularly creates this situation, your decision-making is out of whack with your priorities. You need to either re-assess your priorities or your decision-making.So, what is your No. 1? Everyone has one. It is the one last thing you would give up if you lost everything. It is your reason for existing and the biggest part of how you value yourself as a person. And, whether you acknowledge it or not, protecting your No. 1 thing is your top priority in life. It can either protect or destroy everything else on your priority list. What is it? It could be many things that are very positive including: spouse, children, family, home, status, achievement, career, business, God/religion, or relationships. It could also be negative problems including: addictions, excess, or material items.Deep down, if you really think about it, you can look through your life’s pattern of decisions and figure out your No. 1, but be warned: it may not be what you want it to be.A person’s No. 1 thing has a powerful impact on their decision-making and, if threatened, the No. 1 can lead to irrational and harmful choices. Certainly for many farmers, (right or wrong) there is a great incentive to make the farm their No. 1 thing. It is so easy to do. The farm, for so many, can be a legacy, business, career, family, religion, and self all wrapped into one giant No. 1.During tough economic times such as these, there can be devastating consequences with this. In recent years, hundreds of Ohio dairy farms have gone out of business due (at least in part) to the grim economic situation. That is a tough situation no matter how you look at it, but if milking cows is your No. 1 reason for existing and you lose the farm, then what?Aside from figuring out the top priority, the second most important thing to consider is the ACTUAL placement of “self” on the list based upon decisions that have been made. This is very tricky to determine.If you list your farm as No. 1 and YOU protect “farm” at the continual expense of everything else on YOUR list because YOU have determined it is the most important thing to protect, which item is really at the top of your list? I would argue that, if we really scrutinize most of our lists, sneaky “self” almost universally works it’s way to the top.My apologies for being a bit preachy and grim, but times for agriculture are tough and, with the holiday season just around the corner, I fear stress, anxiety and suffering could all be on the rise for many in the Ohio agricultural community I love. More farms will be lost. More lives will be changed. That is inevitable and, in some cases, beyond control. In our control, however, are the actions we take based on the priorities we set.What’s your No. 1?For further reading, see Mark 9:35 and Exodus 20:3.last_img read more

first_imgThe homework help option isn’t as fully integrated into the system as the scheduling tool, but it will offer access to 24-7 help, crowdsourced Q&A, as well as a database of “answers from the back of the book” – again, based on the textbooks that students have rented.While Chegg has expanded its offerings with the acquisition and integration of Cramster and CourseRank, it still seems largely focused on its core mission, which is textbook rentals. Nonetheless, students will probably appreciate the new tools, as students already turn to their peers for some of this data that Chegg can now provide – namely, is this a difficult class, and how much will textbooks set me back? Furthermore, by offering homework help, Chegg will be driving students to the site not just at the start of each semester, but throughout the school year – a step in making the company a more important part of a student’s world. That may become increasingly important, not just as other textbook rental companies like BookRenter challenge Chegg’s dominance, but as textbooks move from print to digital.Chegg says it plans to continue to build out these offerings and hopes to have the CourseRank feature in place at 1000 universities by the time school starts in the fall. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#E-Books#web audrey watters A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Chegg, the largest online textbook rental company, is unveiling two new services today to help expand its reach into the university student market. Describing it as an effort to personalize its offerings, Chegg will now offer homework help as well as course scheduling information to its customers.These new features aren’t a surprise. They follow Chegg’s acquisitions last year of CourseRank and Cramster. The former offers course scheduling and review information, and the latter offers homework help. The services these companies offered have now been integrated into Chegg so that its textbook rental customers can easily take advantage of them.Using the course scheduling tool, students at 600 participating universities will be able to pick their classes armed with a lot more data: not just the class schedule (the key, of course, is to always avoid classes on Fridays), but the average grade for the class (so students can access its level of difficulty) as well as students’ reviews. Of course, once students have picked their courses, Chegg will automatically show which textbooks are required and, with one click, add them to the rental shopping cart. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

first_imgFirst indications of an alliance being stitched by the smaller political parties for the upcoming Lok Sabha election have emerged in Rajasthan with the Rashtriya Loktantrik Party, formed ahead of the 2018 State Assembly polls, announcing its plan to contest all the 25 seats in association with other parties opposed to the Congress and BJP.The RLP, headed by Khinvsar MLA and BJP rebel Hanuman Beniwal, had won three seats in the State Assembly election. The party had fielded its candidates in 57 constituencies and contested the polls without any alliance.Mr. Beniwal said here on Tuesday that the RLP had not only won three seats, but also obtained a considerable vote share and made an impact on the results in about two dozen Assembly constituencies. The party won Khinvsar and Merta seats in Nagaur district and Bhopalgarh seat in Jodhpur district.The RLP president said the party was trying to enter into an alliance with other parties and discussing the framework of accord with Bahujan Samaj Party, Bharatiya Tribal Party, Communist Party of India and some other smaller political outfits. He said a decision on his own candidature in the Lok Sabha election would be taken after consultations with the party workers and Assembly poll candidates.‘No relief yet’Mr. Beniwal said the Congress, which was elected to power in Rajasthan following its promises made to farmers and youth, had yet to extend relief to vulnerable sections of society. “The loan waiver has not benefited all the eligible farmers, while moong (lentil) procurement is yet to start and the contractual workers in government offices are still waiting for regularisation,” he said.The RLP chief said several promises made in the Congress’ manifesto could have been fulfilled before the election’s model code of conduct came into force. “Evicting the BJP from power has not served the purpose. The ruling Congress is yet to take meaningful action for people’s welfare.”Though the Congress had declared earlier this month that it would have no truck with allies in the Lok Sabha polls, its stance has been perceived as a strategy to put pressure on the smaller parties to accept an alliance on its terms and agree to a limited number of seats.last_img read more