first_imghttps://youtu.be/a80dwn_R-mcThe post Tesla delivers first $35,000 Model 3s to a happy few customers appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward Tesla has started deliveries of the long-promised Model 3 for $35,000 to a happy few customers, but the delivery of the promised vehicle is expected to be short lived. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast.last_img

first_imgUpScale, an EU project aimed at using AI for more efficient EV production, has received a €4 million ($4.5 million) grant from the European Commission to develop computer simulations to aid in the development of EVs.UpScale (Upscaling Product development Simulation Capabilities exploiting Artificial intelligence for Electrified vehicles) consists of 11 companies and European entities representing the automobile, software, engineering, and research sectors.Taking place over the next three and a half years, the project expects to reduce EV development time by 20 percent by applying AI to aerodynamic and crash simulations. Funding for UpScale is being offered through the EU’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program.AI has shown promise for increasing EV efficiency. In March, researchers at MIT, Stanford, and Toyota published a paper detailing how a machine-learning algorithm can accurately predict the life cycle of Li-ion batteries. And in February, the DOE announced plans to offer $30 million for new data science approaches, including AI and machine learning, to accelerate discoveries in energy-related chemistry and materials sciences.Source: UpScale Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

first_img Lost your password? Remember me Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.center_img Username K&L Gates has added Anthony F. Newton as a partner to its energy practice in Houston. Newton, who leaves Haynes and Boone, is the fourth partner to join the Houston office this month.The 1999 graduate of the University of Houston Law Center focuses his practice on energy and infrastructure projects and transactions. He has represented clients in the oil and gas exploration and production, oilfield services, and storage sectors of the energy industry on a variety of corporate, finance, private equity, and tax matters.Recently, Newton has been involved in advising a private oil and gas . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img read more

first_img Username Lost your password? Password The non-profit is dedicated to improving health, safety and productivity in Dallas-area communities by reducing the incidence and impact of alcohol and drug abuse . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

first_imgThe Yakima City Council voted Tuesday against a measure that would have barred Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) from using Yakima Air Terminal-McAllister Field as a hub for deportation.Thursday 4th District Representative Dan Newhouse spoke with local media regarding the city council’s decision.“This is part of the government’s requirement to be able to provide them due process and move them to parts of the country that have the capacity to allow them access to our legal process.” Newhouse said, “If that’s the case then I think that’s exactly what should be happening and we should allow them to do that.”The proposal failed 4 votes to 3 in a packed council chambers. The Sunnyside Republican added that the council’s vote may have been about more than just morality.“There is a potential for the airport to lose access to federal funding if they deny the immigration service (access to) Yakima Airport.” explained Newhouse, “So that may also have been part of consideration on the part of the Yakima City Council.”Earlier in the year ICE was forced to move its regional operations from Boeing Field to McAllister Field after Sea-Tac’s private operators refused to service flights chartered by ICE.last_img read more

first_imgMay 10 2018Montecito Medical Real Estate, a premier owner of medical office buildings throughout the U.S., has acquired the Pinnacle Orthopedics Center, a Class A medical office and surgery center from a leading orthopaedic provider in Woodstock, Georgia, approximately 30-miles north of downtown Atlanta and part of the Atlanta metropolitan area.Built in 2010, the two-story facility is 31,764 square-feet and situated along Towne Lake Parkway, within a medical office cluster in one of the main retail corridors in Woodstock. The property was a build-to-suit for Pinnacle Orthopedics (“Pinnacle”), who anchors the building. The facility contains Pinnacle’s 10,000 square-foot accredited ambulatory surgery center (ASC) with two operating rooms which allows patients to have routine, outpatient, and pain management procedures done to avoid being admitted to a hospital. In addition to the surgery center, there is an MRI suite, and a fully staffed clinic with Physicians and Physical Therapists.”When our building partnership decided to sell, our practice, Pinnacle Orthopedics, was attracted to Montecito because of its experience in acquiring, investing and managing orthopaedic specialty practices around the country. We look forward in being a part of this successful team.” – Pinnacle Orthopedics & Sports MedicineRelated StoriesTransobturator sling surgery shows promise for stress urinary incontinenceImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryOther tenants of the building include Vascular Surgical Associates and Advanced Dental Restorations, consuming approximately 20% of the square footage.”This is the second asset we’ve acquired in the Atlanta market in the last two months,” said Chip Conk, CEO of Montecito Medical. “Pinnacle is a fantastic addition to our growing portfolio and we look forward to growing our presence in the surrounding area.”Pinnacle Orthopedics has been a dominant provider of orthopaedic services in North Atlanta for over 50 years. The group is very involved in the community and acts as the team physician for local high schools, colleges and athletic clubs.The practice consists of 16 physicians, 10 physician assistants, 17 physical and occupational therapists, and a host of administrative staff, and has five locations throughout North Atlanta with many of the providers on staff at WellStar health system hospitals, most notably WellStar Kennestone hospital 11-miles to the south. The 16 specialists cover the entire spectrum of musculoskeletal care both operative and non-operative including hand, foot and ankle, trauma and fractures, joint replacements and reconstruction, limb lengthening and deformity repair, spine, pain management and sports medicine.The Vascular Surgical Associates consists of 11 board certified vascular surgeons, who treat a wide range of vascular disorders. Advanced Dental Restorations is a specialty practice dedicated to restoring and enhancing each patient’s smile.The CBRE U.S. Healthcare Capital Markets group and McWhirter Realty Partners acted as the Seller’s exclusive advisors.Source: https://www.montecitomac.com/apr-24-2018.htmllast_img read more

first_imgAug 1 2018Ascletis announced today it has received the acceptance letter from the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) for Ravidasvir (RDV) new drug application (NDA). Ravidasvir in combination with Ganovo (RDV/DNV Regimen) is the first all-oral interferon-free HCV regimen developed by a domestic company in China. Phase II/III clinical trial has shown that RDV/DNV Regimen demonstrated a cure rate of 99 % ( SVR12) with a short treatment duration of 12 weeks in genotype 1 patients. In patients with baseline NS5A resistance mutations, RDV/DNV Regimen demonstrated a cure rate of 100% (SVR12).Related StoriesPhase III CLL14 study evaluating Venclexta plus Gazyva to treat CLL meets its primary endpointUC San Diego to conduct first U.S. clinical trial of intravenously administered bacteriophage therapyFDA and EMA accept Novartis’ regulatory application for siponimod to treat SPMS in adults”Ascletis was successfully listed this morning on Hong Kong Exchange as the first ever pre-revenue biotech. The NDA for our all-oral HCV regimen was accepted by CFDA in the afternoon.” Jinzi J. Wu, Ph.D., Ascletis’ founder, President and CEO, commented, “Two significant accomplishments on the same day reflect our unremitting effort to provide affordable and effective HCV cures to the patients and to fulfill our commitment to the investors.”Ganovo Regimen, Ascletis’ first breakthrough HCV regimen, was approved on June 8 and launched on June 27, 19 days after the approval. The acceptance of the NDA for its all-oral HCV regimen enables Ascletis soon to provide two HCV treatment options for Chinese patients, strengthening its leading position in China’s HCV field. Source:http://www.ascletis.com/last_img read more

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) MONROVIA—When Kevin De Cock flew home from this city of 1 million in August, he was leaving behind an apocalyptic scene. More than 100 people were coming down with Ebola daily. Patients were dying outside of treatment units filled to capacity, and bodies lay rotting in the streets. Some mathematical models projected that Liberia would face thousands of new cases weekly by December. “There was really no way of knowing how much worse this might get,” says De Cock, an epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.But when he returned to Monrovia on 9 November, the situation was very different. The grim projections had been wrong. Although the Ebola epidemic is still growing in Sierra Leone, and Guinea’s numbers are swinging up and down, Liberia is now reporting only about 20 new patients a day. Treatment units have hundreds of empty beds, and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has lifted the state of emergency put in place in August. Now the country faces new challenges: rebuilding a shattered health care system, tamping down local outbreaks, and looking for ways to drive the number of new cases to zero. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country No one here is quite sure what has caused the epidemic to wane. Safe burials may be a big factor, says Katri Jalava, a Finnish veterinarian and an epidemiological consultant to the World Health Organization. It’s a local custom to wash the corpse and then use the same water to wash the hands of the bereaved, she says. “In terms of a disease like Ebola that is absolutely mad.” Most agree that people’s everyday behavior has changed as well. Ubiquitous street signs warn that “Ebola is real” and tell Monrovians “Don’t be the next case.” Outside many homes are small hand-washing stations with bleach, and Liberians have stopped hugging and shaking hands.Yet “this is still a catastrophe,” De Cock says. Even 20 daily Ebola cases would have been unimaginable a year ago. And Guinea has shown that success in fighting Ebola can be short-lived: Twice, that country was on the cusp of ending the outbreak, and twice the virus came roaring back.Some have even questioned whether Liberia’s recent drop in cases is real. At a meeting at the Liberian ministry of health last week, a U.S. Agency for International Development representative said he had been sent specifically to find out if the numbers can be trusted. “Yes,” answered Swedish statistician Hans Rosling, who has spent the past month in Monrovia helping the Liberian government interpret epidemiological data. CDC researchers, for instance, have used mouth swabs to test dead bodies in Monrovia for Ebola; about 20% to 30% are now positive, down from close to 90% during the height of the epidemic. The real number of cases may be twice the reported number, but not much more, Rosling says. “We’re in a new phase now.”The international response has been slow to adapt. Although the Pentagon has said it will build fewer new Ebola treatment centers, their construction is ongoing. “That doesn’t make sense at all,” says Thierry Goffeau, head of the Doctors Without Borders (MSF) mission in Liberia. “It’s clearly a waste of human and financial resources.” Rosling, too, says tactics have to change. In September, the main job was building clinics, removing the dead, and keeping as many patients as possible isolated. Now, it’s about setting up a flexible system to respond to new outbreaks, identifying patients quickly, and tracing their contacts to prevent more infections. “What we needed to do in the first phase was rugby,” Rosling says. “Now it is chess.”Liberia’s medical system, which collapsed under the weight of Ebola, is gearing up again. Doctors are returning to work, clinics are reopening. Goffeau says that is sorely needed: “People are dying at home of many other diseases than Ebola, because they have no access to health care.” But medical staff still face an important risk. One in every hundred or thousand patients may carry the Ebola virus—which could start new cycles of infection. There are reports that doctors at some clinics are now doing surgery and delivering babies in Ebola protection suits.At Redemption Hospital in Monrovia, whose inpatient department was closed this summer after several doctors died from Ebola, MSF is trying to protect staff with a new triage unit, which opened on 19 November. Patients with Ebola-like symptoms are interviewed; if they meet the criteria for a suspect case, they stay in one of 10 small rooms while their blood is tested. Those who test negative can enter the inpatient ward, while an ambulance takes Ebola patients to a treatment unit. MSF has also started distributing malaria drugs to hundreds of thousands of people, not just to lower the burden of that disease, which was neglected for months, but also to reduce the number of people visiting hospitals with a fever.Reopening Monrovia’s schools poses similar quandaries. One idea is to screen pupils’ temperature as they enter the school. “But what do you do if a 10-year-old kid has a high temperature and the other kids start pointing at him and shouting ‘Ebola’?” Rosling says. In a meeting with President Sirleaf, he has argued for a cautious approach: Opening some schools and carefully studying what happens.The capital region still serves as a reservoir from which patients travel to rural areas and spark fresh outbreaks, De Cock says—and now that the rainy season has ended, travel may pick up. In Bong County, for instance, a few hours northwest of Monrovia, two big outbreaks are spreading, at least one seeded from the capital. The treatment unit in the district of Suakoko, run by the International Medical Corps, is full, and new patients are brought in daily. Sambhavi Cheemalapati, the unit’s program coordinator, says she is seeing far more patients than are accounted for in the official numbers. Aid should focus on spreading prevention messages in these remote locales, Goffeau says. “If the people really understand what Ebola is and how to avoid infection, we might stop this epidemic,” he says.Such regional flare-ups make it unlikely that the Liberian epidemic will be over anytime soon, Rosling says. Still, he believes it’s possible that the country may see its first day without a single case as early as December. Given the cataclysmic projections of just 2 months ago, that would be a remarkable turnaround.*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.last_img read more

first_imgA perch larva’s stomach is filled with microplastics. Oona Lönnstedt Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In a written defense to Borg’s February report, Lönnstedt and Eklöv had questioned his impartiality and the reliability of witnesses because they had ties to the whistleblowers. The panel says it is “unavoidable in a relatively narrow field of research for individuals in that field to be acquainted” and that this didn’t disqualify Borg or the witnesses.The panel also has some stern words for Science. The journal was “deficient” in enforcing its open data policy, the authors say. They add that even if the research had been conducted as described, it would not have proved anything. The microplastics supposedly used in the study were mixed with detergents, according to the report, and the authors didn’t say they had removed these detergents. They, and not the plastic beads, could have caused the effects on fish larvae.That Science accepted the paper is “remarkable,” the group says. Sugden says that for now, he can’t comment on the panel’s report. It took more than 10 months, but today the scientists who blew the whistle on a paper in Science about the dangers of microplastics for fish have been vindicated. An expert group at Sweden’s Central Ethical Review Board (CEPN) has concluded that the paper’s authors, Oona Lönnstedt and Peter Eklöv of Uppsala University (UU), committed “scientific dishonesty” and says that Science should retract the paper, which appeared in June 2016.Science published an editorial expression of concern—which signals that a paper has come under suspicion—on 3 December 2016, and deputy editor Andrew Sugden says a retraction statement is now in preparation. (Science’s news department, which works independently of the journal’s editorial side, published a feature about the case in March.)The report comes as a “huge relief,” says UU’s Josefin Sundin, one of seven researchers in five countries who claimed the paper contained fabricated data shortly after it came out. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Paper about how microplastics harm fish should be retracted, report says Peter Eklöv and Oona Lönnstedt. Sundin was at the Ar Research Station on Gotland, an island in the Baltic Sea, at the time Lönnstedt supposedly carried out her research. She and Fredrik Jutfelt of the Norwegian Institute of Science and Technology in Trondheim, who also spent several days at the research station, said the research simply never took place. But a preliminary investigation by UU published in August 2016 dismissed their claims and suggested they should have brought up their issues with the authors themselves instead of crying foul. Given the weight of the evidence against Lönnstedt and Eklöv, that was a “remarkable” conclusion, the CEPN panel now writes.Lönnstedt and Eklöv did not respond to a request for comment today, although in the past they have suggested the accusations were driven by professional jealousy. UU officials also didn’t respond. A statement posted on the university’s website acknowledges the differences between the two reports and says—according to a machine translation—that “[b]oth reports now form the basis for the university’s forthcoming decision” on whether misconduct took place.In their Science paper, Lönnstedt and Eklöv claimed that European perch larvae prefer to eat tiny beads of polystyrene over natural food, which slows their growth and makes the larvae more likely to be eaten by predators. But Sundin and Jutfelt said Lönnstedt hadn’t spent enough time at the station to do the studies described in Science. They pointed out many other problems in the paper as well, including the fact that the full data weren’t posted in a public repository, as Science requires. (Lönnstedt and Eklöv claimed the data were lost on a laptop that was stolen from a car soon after the paper was published.)The CEPN group hired fish researcher Bertil Borg of Stockholm University to delve into the case. His report, sent to CEPN in February, made clear that Lönnstedt and Eklöv didn’t have answers to many problems and said they had made false statements. But Borg’s conclusion was somewhat ambiguous: “The suspicions of deceit cannot be denied.”The CEPN group now does away with that ambiguity. Answers provided by the accused “have been in all essentials deficient, at times contradictory and have not infrequently given rise to further questions,” the statement says. It declares the duo “guilty of scientific dishonesty” for not having posted the data, and also for making false statements about obtaining ethical approval for the study, both in the Science paper and in their contacts with the committee. Although Lönnstedt was responsible for carrying out the experiments at Ar—Eklöv didn’t visit the station—the report does not absolve him, noting that “in his role as a senior researcher, [he] bore significant responsibility for what transpired.” By Martin EnserinkApr. 28, 2017 , 5:30 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Kristin Scharnwebber Emaillast_img read more

first_img In the past, getting an inside look at living bugs was difficult. During computerized tomography (CT) scans, the tiny subjects would squirm, causing image smearing and distortions. The solution, according to a new study: insect anesthesia. Like many animals, insects become sedentary when exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2). As reported this week in BMC Zoology, researchers subjected black and yellow–striped Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) to a constant flow of CO2. Within seconds, the insects were not moving, but still alive. With these immobilized beetles, researchers were able to get up close and personal with the insides of the bug. The animals were kept asleep between 3 and 7 hours, depending on the complexity of the scan being performed. With the exception of a few older males, the subjects were easily woken up, and the repeated exposure to x-ray radiation and CO2 didn’t seem to harm them. Viewing the CT scans, the beetles’ guts come into full view, showing their complex tracheal system and exoskeleton. The researchers say that with this quick and safe method of knocking out bugs, clearer looks at the insides of living insects are in the near future, and with it, the ability to see the insect life cycle in full detail. Watch an insect expose its guts while still alive By Andrew WagnerAug. 11, 2017 , 11:35 AMlast_img read more

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Updated: Why would a university pay a scientist found guilty of misconduct to leave? *Update, 2 October, 11:30 a.m.: The U.S. government’s watchdog office on scientific misconduct in biomedical research has concluded that Azza El-Remessy, a former tenured associate professor at the University of Georgia in Athens, inappropriately altered data in five images from three papers. The finding of misconduct was issued by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) on 29 September, RetractionWatch reported today.ORI determined that El-Remessy had “intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly used the same Western blot bands to represent different experimental results” in three papers—a 2005 paper in the Journal of Cell Science, a 2013 paper in PLOS ONE, and a 2007 paper in The FASEB Journal. The Journal of Cell Science and The FASEB Journal papers have been retracted. The PLOS ONE paper, which has been cited nine times, according to Clarivate Analytics’ sWeb of Science, has not yet been corrected or retracted.Here is our original story from 31 July: Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email By Victoria Stern, Retraction WatchOct. 2, 2017 , 11:15 AM Josh Hallett/Flickr (CC BY SA 2.0) In June 2016, investigators at the University of Georgia (UGA) in Athens concluded that Azza El-Remessy, a faculty member who studied the impact of diabetes on the eye, had committed misconduct and recommended she be terminated. El-Remessy hired a lawyer to dispute the findings, but the following October she gave up her challenge after the university paid her $100,000—essentially to leave.Such settlements are a common part of the legal landscape, where parties often decide it’s cheaper to reach a financial arrangement than keep racking up legal fees—and risk getting an adverse decision or unwanted public attention in court.But in the world of academic misconduct investigations, it is rare to get a glimpse of such settlements. Such investigations are often kept secret, and the circumstances surrounding a researcher’s departure from a campus can be murky. In this case, however, Retraction Watch filed a public records request for more information. In response, El-Remessy contacted us and told her story.“Maybe I messed up”In 2013, El-Remessy finally felt she had made it. Since moving to the United States from Egypt to pursue her doctorate in 1996, the biologist had built her own lab, achieved tenure, and published more than 50 papers, many in highly ranked journals.“I was on top of the world,” she says. “All of my hard work had paid off.”Then, in October 2013, she received an email from an editor at PLOS ONE informing her that an anonymous reader had noticed two duplicate images in a 2013 paper—one published in a 2012 Molecular Vision paper and the other in a 2013 Diabetologia paper.“My initial reaction was shock,” El-Remessy says.The journals investigated and chalked up the duplications to an unintentional mistake. In April 2014, PLOS ONE and Diabetologia issued errata, in which El-Remessy replaced the figures.But the probe didn’t end there. In mid-August of 2014, El-Remessy received an email from the editorial board at Molecular Vision, where she was also an editor. The board informed her and her former Ph.D. adviser and current research collaborator Gregory Liou, based at Georgia Regents University in Augusta (now Augusta University), of their plans to retract three papers. All of the papers listed Liou as corresponding author and El-Remessy as first author. Again, an anonymous reader had drawn the editors’ attention to several figures that contained identical, mirror, or transposed images. The journal retracted all three articles.The same month, the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cell Science also raised concerns about potential manipulation of Western blot data in a 2005 paper, on which El-Remessy was first and corresponding author.This, El-Remessy says, is when the allegations “escalated to a different level.”By mid-September, the journal’s executive editor had contacted officials at Georgia Regents University and UGA with concerns about the Journal of Cell Science paper and El-Remessy’s explanations. El-Remessy told the editor that she had “naïvely wanted to present clean and pretty representatives,” but did not intentionally attempt to falsify or misrepresent data, according to a report produced later by a UGA investigative committee.In October, editors at Molecular Vision also contacted UGA’s research integrity officer, Regina Smith, with concerns about El-Remessy’s work in six papers.A few days later, Smith notified El-Remessy that the allegations into her research warranted a formal inquiry. At this point, seven of her papers were being questioned.“It looked like I was the common denominator,” she says. “I was scared I was going to lose what I had been building.” Throughout the investigation, which began in early 2015, El-Remessy continued to publish, run her lab, and teach students and residents. She even received two raises.Honest error?El-Remessy insists that any problems with her images were the result of honest mistakes. In the 1990s, “we didn’t have formal training on Photoshop,” she says, maintaining there were different standards for image construction. “I would adjust images to make them perfect. I did not do it in bad faith, it was lack of experience and good judgment. If I could go back and fix my mistakes, I would,” she says. “Maybe I messed up in the figures, but I never tried to deceive the scientific community.”Academic researchers facing misconduct allegations often present an “honest error” defense, says Paul Thaler, a partner at the firm Cohen Seglias Pallas Greenhall & Furman PC in Washington, D.C., who has represented researchers involved in misconduct proceedings for more than 25 years. “Honest error is one of the better defenses for researchers, if it’s true,” Thaler says. To make a misconduct finding, courts often demand evidence of knowing, intentional misconduct, he notes. And without intentional deception, “there can be no [finding of] federal research misconduct,” he adds.But the honest error defense has produced mixed results. And in El-Remessy’s case, UGA didn’t buy her explanation. In June 2016, the investigation committee released a report that concluded El-Remessy “committed falsification and/or fabrication, that the actions were intentional to support the claims of the manuscripts/grant applications, and that the actions involved unsound practices that depart significantly from the standard practice in the field.” The panel recommended that El-Remessy be terminated from her posts at UGA and Augusta University, and that all relevant parties—journals, co-authors, funding agencies, and her third employer, the Veterans Administration (VA)—be notified of the decision.The committee’s findings prompted the Journal of Cell Science to retract the 2005 paper it had questioned in 2014, and The FASEB Journal to retract a 2007 paper. Of the 12 papers flagged in the 13 allegations, five have been retracted and one accepted Diabetes paper was withdrawn before publication. Four other papers have received corrections.Fighting backEl-Remessy fought back, hiring an attorney to dispute the misconduct findings. She flagged what she says are inaccuracies in the report and argued that the university targeted her unfairly. Liou and Ruth Caldwell, who oversaw El-Remessy as a postdoc at Augusta University and later became a frequent collaborator, wrote letters taking responsibility for the figure errors in several papers. VA didn’t agree with UGA’s findings, and in August, decided to reopen an independent investigation into six of the 10 allegations. The university continued to stand by its investigation.Then, in October, the university gave El-Remessy the financial settlement after she agreed to leave. The parties agreed on $100,000—the highest amount the university can approve without taking the case to the board of regents.According to Gregory Trevor, executive director of media communications at UGA: “The University entered into the settlement to efficiently and amicably resolve disputes with Dr. El-Remessy. The settlement allowed both parties to move on without the uncertainty and distraction of further proceedings.”But given El-Remessy’s “honest error” defense, UGA may not have been confident it would win in court—or perhaps concerned about the costs even if it won. “A settlement is ultimately a business decision for a university,” says Thaler, who was not involved in the case. “Although $100,000 may sound like a lot, if you consider how much a university pays a tenured professor and the expense of a hearing, it isn’t very much … and there is always a risk that the university will lose [a case], in which case the professor gets to stay.”Aside from the expense of litigation, Thaler says universities might be concerned about the perception of continuing to employ a researcher it found guilty of misconduct, if the outcome becomes public. And the researcher may share that reputational concern. “If word gets out, it may be hard to find new employment, and in that context, the settlement amount might sound even low,” he says.El-Remessy says she gave up her job at UGA with the hope she could move on to another institution and continue her career. But more than half a year later, she continues to struggle to land a new job and rebuild her reputation.”I have deep wounds and I live in agony about the whole thing every single minute. I still do not accept to end my career in this way,” El-Remessy says. “I am still hopeful that someone will listen and I will clear my name and continue my life peacefully.”last_img read more

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Department of Energy moves forward with controversial test reactor Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it will go forward with plans to build a controversial new nuclear reactor that some critics have called a boondoggle. If all goes as planned, the Versatile Test Reactor (VTR) will be built at DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) near Idaho Falls and will generate copious high-energy neutrons to test new material and technologies for nuclear reactors. That would fill a key gap in the United States’s nuclear capabilities, proponents say. However, some critics have argued that the project is just an excuse to build a reactor of the general type that can generate more fuel than it consumes by “breeding” plutonium.“This is a cutting-edge advanced reactor,” said Secretary of Energy Rick Perry at a press conference today at DOE headquarters in Washington, D.C. “It will give American companies the ability that they currently lack to conduct advanced technology and fuels tests without having to go to our competitors in Russia or China.”Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, a nuclear engineer at INL who leads the project and was not at the press conference, says, “Obviously, this is very good news. It validates that we need this reactor.” By Adrian ChoFeb. 28, 2019 , 5:40 PMcenter_img The VTR—also known as the Versatile Fast Neutron Source—would be the first reactor DOE has built since the 1970s. It would differ in one key respect from the typical commercial power reactors. Power reactors use a uranium fuel that contains just a few percent of the fissile isotope uranium-235 and is made to be used once and discarded. In contrast, the VTR would use a fuel richer in uranium-235 that would generate more high-energy neutrons as it “burned.” Those neutrons could be used to test how new materials and components age within the core of a conventional nuclear reactor, a key factor in reactor design.In principle, such a “fast reactor” could also convert nonfissile uranium-238 to plutonium-239, which could be extracted by reprocessing the fuel. Many nuclear engineers envision a future in which the world relies on such fast reactors and reprocessed fuel for its electricity. Critics of the nuclear industry argue that breeder reactors are unnecessary and risky, as they would establish an economy in plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. Some critics say the VTR is a way to keep that controversial dream alive—although VTR developers do not plan to breed plutonium or reprocess fuel.The VTR already has friends in both parties in Congress, which in September 2018 gave the project $65 million for this fiscal year—even before DOE had definitely decided it wanted the reactor. However, Pasamehmetoglu urges caution about interpreting the DOE announcement. Strictly speaking, he says, it means the project has passed the first of five milestones—known as “critical decisions”—and that DOE has decided it needs the VTR to fulfill its mission. “It’s just a start,” Pasamehmetoglu says. “It doesn’t mean by any stretch of the imagination that DOE has said that they’re going to go out and build this.”Still, Pasamehmetoglu is optimistic. Researchers will now start to work on a conceptual design. They are still a couple of steps away from hammering out a detailed cost estimate and schedule. But Pasamehmetoglu estimates the reactor would cost between $3 billion and $3.5 billion and says the goal is to get it running in 2026. It would be a small 300-megawatt reactor, most likely cooled with liquid sodium, that would not produce electrical power.At the press conference, held with Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency in Paris, Perry also announced $24 million in new projects on technologies to capture carbon dioxide emissions from industrial plants and sequester the gas underground. “We believe that you can’t have a serious conversation about reducing emissions without including nuclear energy and carbon capture technologies,” Perry said. He noted projections suggest that in 2040 the world will still depend on fossil fuels for 77% of its energy, and in just the next 18 months U.S. exports of liquid natural gas should climb 150%, Perry said.Clarification, 1 March 2019, 12:30 p.m.: The story has been updated to clarify why some critics of the nuclear industry object to reactors that could breed plutonium. Email A new “fast” nuclear reactor would work a bit like the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which ran until 1994 at what is now Idaho National Laboratory. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country NASA By Richard A. LovettJan. 29, 2019 , 12:45 PM Ancient Earth rock found on the moon What may be the oldest-known Earth rock has turned up in a surprising place: the moon. A 2-centimeter chip embedded in a larger rock collected by Apollo astronauts is actually a 4-billion-year-old fragment of our own planet, scientists say.“It’s a very provocative conclusion but it could be right,” says Munir Humayun, a cosmochemist at Florida State University in Tallahassee. The finding “helps paint a better picture of early Earth and the bombardment that modified our planet during the dawn of life,” says David Kring, a lunar geologist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, and an author on a study published on 24 January in Earth and Planetary Science Letters.Sometime after the rock formed, Kring says, an asteroid impact blasted it from Earth. It found its way to the moon, which was three times closer to Earth than it is today. The fragment was later engulfed in a lunar breccia, a motley type of rock. Finally, Apollo 14 astronauts returned it to Earth in 1971. Although geologists have found meteorites on Earth that came from the moon, Mars, and asteroids, “This is the first time a rock from the moon has been interpreted as a terrestrial meteorite,” says Elizabeth Bell, a geochemist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not part of the study. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img The large Apollo 14 sample called “Big Bertha” holds a 2-centimeter chip thought to be from Earth. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Several years ago, a team led by Kring detected fragments of asteroids in similar moon rocks, so looking for pieces of Earth was a logical next step.Trace elements in the rock’s minerals, which are a granitelike mix of quartz, feldspar, and zircon crystals, provided clues to its origin. By measuring uranium and its decay products in the zircons, the team dated the formation of the rock, while titanium levels helped reveal the temperature and pressure at the time. Still other trace elements, such as cerium, pointed to the amount of water likely to have been present.The results, Kring says, indicate that the rock formed in a water-rich environment at temperatures and pressures corresponding to either 19 kilometers beneath the surface of Earth, or about 170 kilometers deep in the moon. Craig O’Neill, a geodynamicist at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, favors an Earth origin because a depth of 170 kilometers would be “crazy”—way below the moon’s crust, where granitic rocks could have formed.The rock isn’t Earth’s oldest relic: Zircon crystals from western Australia have been dated to as far back as 4.4 billion years, only 150 million years after Earth’s formation. But these zircons were stripped from their parent rocks and reworked into new materials. Here, Kring says, there’s no doubt that the rock and its zircons formed at the same time. “We’re sure it’s a complete rock,” he says. The rock is about as old as the oldest rocks found on Earth—metamorphic rocks from Canada and Greenland.Bell says its preservation is not so surprising because the moon lacks the weather and geologic processes that erase ancient rocks on Earth. In fact, she says, the moon might be a better place to look for ancient Earth rocks than Earth itself. Norm Sleep, a geophysicist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, agrees. He says that although meteorites from Earth probably constitute a tiny fraction of the moon’s surface material, eons of subsequent asteroid impacts have churned them throughout the lunar soil, making it easier to find a small piece of Earth in a random sample of moon.If the rock is truly terrestrial, it holds clues about an ancient time called the Hadean. For starters, it confirms Earth was being hit by asteroids big enough to blast rocks all the way to the moon. It also shows that the granitic rocks that make up Earth’s continents were already forming, Kring says. “That’s a big thing.”Kring believes other scientists will soon be combing the Apollo moon rocks for bits of early Earth. Only a small fraction of the 382 kilograms of rocks brought back by the moonwalkers have been studied, he says, and analytical techniques are constantly improving. “I think we are going to get a little library of fragments of the early Earth emerging in the next few years,” he says.last_img read more

first_img ALEX BURKY/PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A MERMAID undergoes testing off Japan’s coast in 2018. By Erik StokstadApr. 17, 2019 , 3:15 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe These ocean floats can hear earthquakes, revealing mysterious structures deep inside Earthcenter_img A versatile, low-cost way to study Earth’s interior from sea has yielded its first images and is scaling up. By deploying hydrophones inside neutrally buoyant floats that drift through the deep ocean, seismologists are detecting earthquakes that occur below the sea floor and using the signals to peer inside Earth in places where data have been lacking.In February, researchers reported that nine of these floats near Ecuador’s Galápagos Islands had helped trace a mantle plume—a column of hot rock rising from deep below the islands. Now, 18 floats searching for plumes under Tahiti have also recorded earthquakes, the team reported last week at the European Geosciences Union (EGU) meeting here. “It seems they’ve made a lot of progress,” says Barbara Romanowicz, a geophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley.The South Pacific fleet will grow this summer, says Frederik Simons, a seismologist at Princeton University who helped develop the floats, called MERMAIDs (mobile earthquake recorders in marine areas by independent divers). He envisions a global flotilla of thousands of these wandering devices, which could also be used to detect the sound of rain or whales, or outfitted with other environmental or biological sensors. “The goal is to instrument all the oceans.” Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) For decades, geologists have placed seismometers on land to study how powerful, faraway earthquakes pass through Earth. Deep structures of different density, such as the cold slabs of ocean crust that sink into the mantle along subduction zones, can speed up or slow down seismic waves. By combining seismic information detected in various locations, researchers can map those structures, much like 3D x-ray scans of the human body. Upwelling plumes and other giant structures under the oceans are more mysterious, however. The reason is simple: There are far fewer seismometers on the ocean floor.Such instruments are expensive because they must be deployed and retrieved by research vessels. And sometimes they fail to surface after yearlong campaigns. More recently, scientists have begun to use fiber optic communication cables on the sea floor to detect quakes, but the approach is in its infancy.MERMAIDs are a cheap alternative. They drift at a depth of about 1500 meters, which minimizes background noise and lessens the energy needed for periodic ascents to transmit fresh data. Whenever a MERMAID’s hydrophone picks up a strong sound pulse, its computer evaluates whether that pressure wave likely originated from seafloor shaking. If so, the MERMAID surfaces within a few hours and sends the seismogram via satellite.The nine floats released near the Galápagos in 2014 gathered 719 seismograms in 2 years before their batteries ran out. Background noise, such as wind and rain at the ocean surface, drowned out some of the seismograms. But 80% were helpful in imaging a mantle plume some 300 kilometers wide and 1900 kilometers deep, the team described in February in Scientific Reports. The widely dispersed MERMAIDs sharpened the picture, compared with studies done with seismometers on the islands and in South America. “The paper demonstrates the potential of the methodology, but I think they need to figure out how to beat down the noise a little more,” Romanowicz says.Since that campaign, the MERMAID design was reworked by research engineer Yann Hello of Geoazur, a geoscience lab in Sophia Antipolis, France. He made them spherical and stronger, and tripled battery life. The floats now cost about $40,000, plus about $50 per month to transmit data. “The MERMAIDs are filling a need for a fairly inexpensive, flexible device” to monitor the oceans, says Martin Mai, a geophysicist at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.Between June and September of 2018, 18 of these new MERMAIDs were scattered around Tahiti to explore the Pacific Superswell, an expanse of oddly elevated ocean crust, likely inflated by plumes. The plan is to illuminate this plumbing and find out whether multiple plumes stem from a single deep source. “It’s a pretty natural target,” says Catherine Rychert, a seismologist at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom. “You’d need a lot of ocean bottom seismometers, a lot of ships, so having floats out there makes sense.”So far, the MERMAIDs have identified 258 earthquakes, Joel Simon, a graduate student at Princeton, told the EGU meeting. About 90% of those have also been detected by other seismometers around the world—an indication that the hydrophones are detecting informative earthquakes. Simon has also identified some shear waves, or S-waves, which arrive after the initial pressure waves of a quake and can provide clues to the mantle’s composition and temperature. “We never set out to get S-waves,” he said. “This is incredible.” S-waves can’t travel through water, so they are converted to pressure waves at the sea floor, which saps their energy and makes them hard to identify.In August, 28 more MERMAIDS will join the South Pacific fleet, two dozen of them bought by the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, China. Heiner Igel, a geophysicist at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, cheers the expansion. “I would say drop them all over the oceans,” he says.last_img read more

first_imgThe problem with some authorized biopics — films that tell a celebrity’s life story as overseen by the celebrity — is that they tend to tell the safe, whitewashed version. It doesn’t look as if that will be the case with Rocketman, the story of Elton John’s life. “The movie begins with Elton marching into rehab in a really bad way, sweaty, grinding his teeth and that’s our jumping-off point for the film. We learn his life through him recanting his experiences from this therapy room,” actor Taron Egerton, who portrays Elton John, told the media this year.Rocketman promotional posterThe actor’s personality early in his career was “ugly,” Egerton said after screening 15 minutes of footage. It shows him at his “most vulnerable…most broken and damaged…about someone who was not well becoming well.”“What I felt was very special about this project is largely down to Elton’s very specific personality type, and especially him having gone through recovery, which I think leads to a certain quality of openness and candidness,” Egerton said.Elton John attending the premiere of The Union at the Tribeca Film Festival. Photo by David Shankbone CC BY 3.0The film is scheduled to be released May 31, 2019. It also stars Jamie Bell as lyricist Bernie Taupin, Richard Madden as his first manager, and Bryce Dallas Howard as Elton’s mother. It was directed by Dexter Fletcher, who finished the film Bohemian Rhapsody after Bryan Singer was fired. Check out the trailer below.The film has been described as “a musical fantasy about the fantastical human story of Elton John’s breakthrough years.” Tom Hardy was originally attached to the film until he dropped out for scheduling reasons. Taron Egerton then took the lead role; he is best known for the film Kingsman.Taron Egerton at the 2018 Global Education and Skills Forum. Photo by Fuzheado CC BY-SA 4.0Elton John was one of the film’s producers. Egerton praised Elton’s position that Rocketman could show him at his “most vulnerable.” The actor said, “It’s right at the heart of what makes Rocketman quite special because Elton gave me the license to go and make him look quite ugly at times, that was always very important to me.”The film has received an R rating, and rumors have been flying around the Internet about whether Elton John’s sexuality will be depicted.Fletcher at the 58th BFI London Film Festival Awards in 2014. Photo by wizardradiomedia CC BY 3.0Director Fletcher elaborated on why the film shouldn’t be described as a “biopic.”“Sure, there’s aspects and elements and in large part, it’s based on the early part of Elton’s career and his rise to fame and the price that he paid for that, but I think a musical fantasy really is a great way to describe it,” he told the media.“Elton is our storyteller in the film and it’s his memory of those times, and sometimes our memory plays tricks on us or we remember things in a particularly colorful or different way and that’s the idea we’re playing with.”Elton John on stage in 1971. Photo by yabosid CC BY SA 2.0The film will include classic songs including “Crocodile Rock” and “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me,” with Egerton doing his own singing, not being dubbed by Elton John. The director praised Egerton’s “snot, blood and sweat and tears performance” as Elton John. Amid all of the suffering, the heart of the film is the friendship and evolving partnership between Elton and Bernie Taupin.Elton John at the Musikhalle Hamburg, in March 1972. Photo by Heinrich Klaffs CC BY-SA 2.0“Although Elton puts his relationship with Bernie front and center constantly, he is the unsung hero of all of those songs that we all know and love,” Egerton said. “So this movie, quite rightly, is about friendship and a writing partnership as much as it is about this icon we all know and love.”Read another story from us: Rocket Man! Fantastic Elton John Memorabilia to be AuctionedHe said Bell was “just such a perfect fit for someone intensely likable, dependable, consistent, always there, with creative verve and a glint in his eye. He was just a perfect person to play that role, and we had a great time bringing that relationship to life.”Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

first_imgShareTweetSharePinThe United Workers Party (UWP) is presenting, to the nation, its candidates for the next general election on the Roseau Bayfront.The event began at about 4:00 o’clock this afternoon.Below are some pictures taken earlier this evening at the event.  Video Playerhttps://dominicanewsonline.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/WhatsApp-Video-2019-05-19-at-8.31.30-PM.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.last_img read more

first_img Advertising The state prison secretary said in a statement that prisoners began fighting among themselves around noon, and security reinforcements were rushed to the Anisio Jobim Prison Complex in the state capital of Manaus.The secretary, Col. Marcus Vinicius Oliveira de Ameida, said the situation was now “under control,” though police helicopters continued to fly over the complex as a precaution.There was no information about any escapes. The same prison was the scene of a severe riot in January 2017 that killed 56 people. Brazil: Prison riot in Amazonas state leaves at least 15 dead Relatives protest for more information, outside the Anisio Jobim Prison Complex where a deadly riot erupted among inmates in the northern state of Amazonas, Brazil. (AP)Fighting erupted among inmates at a prison in the northern state of Amazonas on Sunday, and at least 15 people died before the riot was brought under control, authorities said. Related News Brazil president rebuts European criticism over environment By AP |Rio De Janeiro | Published: May 27, 2019 9:39:17 am Copa America Final 2019 Highlights: Brazil win it on their home soil Brazil primed for home Copa America triumph, wary of upset threat Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img Advertising “So the appeal I make, now that we are in a situation where European (Parliament) elections are behind us, is to stop this electoral agitation. The numbers arriving in Europe are frankly manageable,” he said. Refugee women from Iran, Afghanistan, Somalia are cooking up a storm in the Capital Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach UNHCR, united nations report, united nations, refugees, refugees in developing countries, world news, indian express More than two-thirds of the world’s refugees come from five countries: Syria, Afghanistan, South Sudan, Myanmar, and Somalia, the report said. (File photo)* Record 70.8 million forcibly displaced at end of 2018 – UNHCR* Poor countries host most refugees despite Western fears* 5 million Venezuelans may have fled homeland by year-end* Asylum-seekers arriving in the US entitled to a fair hearing After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan By Reuters |Geneva | Published: June 19, 2019 1:46:49 pm For refugees in India, celebrating Eid is a bitter-sweet affair More Explained Developing countries, not rich Western nations, are bearing the brunt of the world’s refugee crisis and are hosting most of the record 70.8 million displaced people who have fled war and persecution, the United Nations said on Wednesday.Half of the world’s forcibly displaced are children and the 2018 total is the highest in nearly 70 years, the U.N. refugee agency said in its annual flagship report, Global Trends.But the global figure, which comprises 25.9 million refugees, 41.3 million people uprooted within their homelands, and 3.5 million asylum-seekers, is “conservative”, it said. Related News Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising 1 Comment(s) “That’s where the crisis is, that’s a need where we need to focus,” he told a news briefing.More than two-thirds of the world’s refugees come from five countries: Syria, Afghanistan, South Sudan, Myanmar, and Somalia, the report said.ASYLUM CLAIMUS President Donald Trump has made reducing illegal migration along the border with Mexico one of his signature policy pledgesCentral Americans reaching the United States after fleeing violence or persecution in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador are entitled to request asylum, Grandi said Advertising Best Of Express The United States should give such people a fair hearing and not separate children from their parents, he said, adding that his agency stood ready to help US authorities deal with the challengeWith 254,300 asylum claims lodged in 2018, the United States is the world’s largest recipient of applications, the report saidBut Grandi said the United States has a huge backlog of 800,000 cases to be processed and that his agency was also helping Mexico to beef up its capacity to handle asylum-seekersAsked whether Trump’s policies had made the work of UNHCR more difficult, he said: “It’s not just in the United States, in Europe as well, and Australia“This is the crisis of solidarity that I have mentioned. It is identifying refugees and migrants with a problem instead of people that are fleeing from a problem,” he saidIn Europe, the issue has been heavily politicised, leaving some governments “terrified” to commit to taking in people rescued at sea after fleeing Libya or other conflict zones, Grandi said Donald Trump administration allows 7,000 Syrians to stay in US for another 18 months Taking stock of monsoon rain That is because it does not include most of the 4 million Venezuelans who have fled abroad since 2015 as they do not need visas or to lodge asylum claims to stay in most host countries. If the outflow continues, a total of 5 million Venezuelans could have left by year-end, it said.“Certainly if the situation is not solved politically in Venezuela, with a political agreement, we will see a continuation of this exodus,” Filippo Grandi, U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, told a news briefing.Venezuelans, arriving mainly in Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador, formed the second biggest flow abroad last year after Syrians fleeing to Turkey following eight years of war, the report said.“When you say Europe has a refugee emergency or the United States, or Australia – no. Most of the refugees are in fact in the country next to where the war is, and unfortunately that means mostly in poor countries or in middle-income countries,” Grandi said.last_img read more

first_imgEarly-career scientists hold a rally at the office of the Ministry of Human Resource Development in New Delhi on 16 January. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A 25% pay raise? That’s not nearly enough, young Indian scientists say Email The hike will cost the government 6 billion to 7 billion rupees ($84 million to $98 million) according to DST estimate. Ashutosh Sharma, DST’s secretary, calls the raises a “positive development … which research scholars should ideally applaud.”But many scientists say it’s not nearly enough. Even after the increase, research fellows in the first 2 years of their Ph.D. program will make only 31,000 rupees ($435) per month, and 35,000 rupees ($491) in the years after that. Research associates can make up to $758. Many will still earn little more than a government janitor or gardener, and the rates are a fraction of what Ph.D. students in Western countries can make. “We are very disappointed,” says Nikhil Gupta, a Ph.D. scholar in human physiology at the Center of Biomedical Research in Lucknow, India. “How can India progress if research scholars are unhappy?” Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai called the announcement “a blatant insult to the research scholars” in a statement. The protesters also want an end to delays of up to several months in their payments. The new statement does not address that problem.The hikes won’t stem the brain drain from India, many say. China is offering 1500 lucrative postdoctoral fellowships to lure Indian students, says C. N. R. Rao, a solid-state chemist at the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research in Bengaluru, India, and a science adviser to the previous prime minister. Rao’s first reaction to the offer, he says, was: “Oh God, this is inadequate as it just does not meet the needs and aspirations.”Ignoring the researchers’ demands puts the government’s political future at risk, Vishwakarma says. “With India’s elections just 2 months away, we will ask young researchers to vote out the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, which has been unfair to researchers.” C. N. R. Rao, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research Pallava Bagla Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe NEW DELHI—In response to months of protests and marches, the Indian government announced yesterday that it will give early-career scientists raises of up to 25%. But leaders of the protest movement, who had asked for an 80% hike, immediately rejected the offer. “This hike is not acceptable. We will continue the street protests,” says Lal Chandra Vishwakarma, chair of the Society of Young Researchers at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) here.Vishwakarma says research scholars will discuss how to proceed at an AIIMS meeting on Saturday, where “a nationwide shutdown of labs will be considered.”The raise benefits more than 60,000 research fellows, a press statement issued by the Department of Science & Technology (DST) here says; all will get raises of at least 24%. (Indian research fellows also receive a housing allowance that varies by city.) And from now on, high performers can be eligible for additional financial incentives, says Krishnaswamy VijayRaghavan, the government’s principal scientific adviser, although details of the scheme have yet to be announced. Oh God, this is inadequate as it just does not meet the needs and aspirations. By Pallava BaglaJan. 31, 2019 , 1:25 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

first_imgGarner’s family was incensed by the decision, the latest from a Justice Department under President Donald Trump that has scaled-back use of consent decrees aimed at improving local police departments found to have violated civil rights.“This should have been taken care of years ago,” said Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, a vocal police reform advocate since her son’s death. “This should have been taken care of under the Obama administration. Then we would have had a fairer playing ground.”The Rev. Al Sharpton renewed his calls for the New York Police Department to fire the 34-year-old Pantaleo, who’s been on desk duty since Garner’s death and is awaiting the results of a disciplinary hearing that could lead to his firing. Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office said it expects a decision by Aug. 31.“Five years ago, Eric Garner was choked to death,” Sharpton said. “Today, the federal government choked Lady Justice, and that is why we were outraged.” Best Of Express “As a black man in America I have no expectation that we will receive justice in court without radical change in this country,” Newsome said. 'I can't breathe' case: No charges against NY police in 2014 choking death of black man Emerald Garner, center, daughter of chokehold victim Eric Garner, reacts during a prayer at the National Action Network headquarters, Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in New York (AP)After years of silence, federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they won’t bring criminal charges against a white New York City police officer in the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner, a black man whose dying words _ “I can’t breathe” _ became a national rallying cry against police brutality.The decision to end a yearslong civil rights investigation without charges was made by Attorney General William Barr and was announced the day before the five-year anniversary of the deadly Staten Island encounter, just as the statute of limitations was set to expire. Amid those demonstrations, a man angry about the Garner and Brown cases ambushed and fatally shot two New York City police officers as they sat in their cruiser, further shocking the city and leading to the creation of the pro-police Blue Lives Matter movement. People attend a news conference with Gwen Carr, the mother of Eric Garner, following the decision to not prosecute NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo at City Hall in New York, U.S., July 16, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermidProsecutors in Brooklyn repeatedly watched video of the confrontation between Garner and police, Donoghue said, but weren’t convinced Pantaleo willfully violated the law in using a chokehold, which is banned under police department policy.Pantaleo initially tried to use two approved restraint tactics on Garner, much larger at 6-foot-2 and about 400 pounds, but ended up wrapping his arm around Garner’s neck “in what was, in effect, a chokehold” for about seven seconds as they struggled against a glass storefront window and fell to the sidewalk, Donoghue said.“Significantly, Officer Pantaleo was not engaged in a chokehold on Mr. Garner when he said he could not breathe, and neither Officer Pantaleo nor any other officer applied a chokehold to Mr. Garner after he first said he could not breathe,” Donoghue said.Garner could be heard on bystander video crying out “I can’t breathe” at least 11 times before he fell unconscious. The medical examiner’s office said a chokehold contributed to Garner’s death.The federal probe resulted in two sets of recommendations.The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Brooklyn recommended no charges, while civil rights prosecutors in Washington recommended charging the officer. Barr, who watched the video himself and got several briefings, made the ultimate decision, a senior Justice Department official said.The official spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss internal deliberations and investigative matters.Donoghue announced the decision not to charge Pantaleo after meeting with Garner’s family, but the news was reported in the media beforehand, angering advocates.At the news conference, Donoghue said he expressed his and Barr’s condolences. He said Garner’s death was a tragedy and that “for anyone to die under circumstances like these is a tremendous loss.” He also apologized for the length of the investigation, calling the delay “entirely inappropriate and unacceptable.”In the years since Garner’s death, the NYPD has made a series of sweeping changes on how it relates to the communities it serves, ditching a policy of putting rookie officers in higher-crime precincts in favor of a neighborhood policing model that revolves around community officers tasked with getting to know New Yorkers.De Blasio, who is touting his leadership on police-community relations on the presidential campaign trail, said the city is not the same as it was five years ago.“Reforms over the last five years have improved relations between our police and our communities,” de Blasio said in a statement, adding that crime was at record lows and 150,000 fewer people were arrested last year than the year before he took office.But some activists, including Garner’s family and relatives of others killed by police, have argued the changes aren’t enough.De Blasio also said that it was a mistake for the city to wait for federal prosecutors to finish investigating Garner’s death before the police department began disciplinary proceedings. But there is no rule requiring the NYPD to do so.Police reform advocates said the decision not to charge Pantaleo was upsetting but to be expected.Joo Hyun-Kang, the director of Communities United for Police Reform, said it was “outrageous but not shocking.” Hawk Newsome, the head of the New York area Black Lives Matter chapter said, “It’s America, man.” Trump says ‘will take a look’ at accusations over Google, China Advertising Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Civil rights prosecutors in Washington had favored filing criminal charges against Officer Daniel Pantaleo, but ultimately Barr sided with other federal prosecutors based in Brooklyn who said evidence, including a bystander’s widely viewed cellphone video, wasn’t sufficient to make a case, a Justice Department official told The Associated Press.Richard Donoghue, the U.S. Attorney in Brooklyn, said at a news conference that while Garner’s death was tragic, there was insufficient evidence to prove that Pantaleo or any other officers involved in the confrontation on a Staten Island sidewalk had willfully violated his civil rights.“Even if we could prove that Officer Pantaleo’s hold of Mr. Garner constituted unreasonable force, we would still have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Officer Pantaleo acted willfully in violation of the law,” Donoghue said. Related News Advertising Pantaleo’s lawyer, Stuart London, said the officer “is gratified that the Justice Department took the time to carefully review the actual evidence in this case rather than the lies and inaccuracies which followed this case from its inception.”Pantaleo’s union president, Pat Lynch, said: “scapegoating a good and honorable officer, who was doing his job in the manner he was taught, will not heal the wounds this case has caused for our entire city.”Garner’s death _ after he refused to be handcuffed for allegedly selling loose, untaxed cigarettes _ came at a time of a growing public outcry over police killings of unarmed black men that gave impetus to the national Black Lives Matter movement. Just weeks later, protests erupted in Ferguson, Missouri, over the fatal shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.When a Staten Island grand jury declined to indict Pantaleo on state charges in December 2014, demonstrations flared in New York and several other cities. By AP | Published: July 17, 2019 9:15:48 am Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post US mulls increasing merit-based immigration to 57% Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file More Explained Post Comment(s) ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Express daily briefing: Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict out today; SC to rule on Karnataka MLAs’ plea; and more Advertisinglast_img read more